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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 11 found.

The Intersection of Equity, Disparities and the Multi-Dimensions of Family and Community Engagement. Year Developed: 2019. Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Presenter(s): Alice Farrell, JD, LCSW, MSW . Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 88 minute.

Annotation: The Early Childhood Family Network’s (ECFN) vision is to live in a world where all children birth to eight are safe, healthy, and inspired to lifelong learning. Join EFCN for its inaugural webinar series for families and partners dedicated to early childhood social and emotional development. Dr. Alice Farrell presents on effective engagement strategies for counteracting the disparities that many families and children experience and how focusing on the use of best practices in engagement can yield positive family and community connections.

Tips and Tricks To Starting a Young Adult Council . Year Developed: 2018. Source: University of Massachusetts Medical School, Transitions to Adulthood Center for Research. Presenter(s): Rafael Mizrahi, B.S.; Tania Duperoy, BA;. Type: Video. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes. List of webinars

Annotation: This webinar describes how youth councils can help promote a national diverse youth voice and improve and educate the mental health community and beyond; describes successes and challenges of facilitating a national youth council to infuse meaningful youth input into service delivery and development; and identifies concrete tools for authentically infusing national youth voices in diverse organizations. A video and slides are available.

Leadership is a Journey: A Series for Youth Self-Advocates. Year Developed: 2018. Source: Family Voices and National Center for Family-Professional Partnerships. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: Series; various lengths.

Annotation: This webinar series for youth supports the identification of leadership as a journey and support understanding and learning in key leadership development areas. • Webinar 1 & 2: Knowing Yourself as a Leader: These webinars provide short leadership development sessions. These first sessions explore how personal reflection and self-assessment helps each of us increase our understanding of our personal leadership style. They provide examples of reflection and assessment activities and include personal experiences from advocates for youth. • Webinar 3 & 4: What is my Culture? What are my Values?: Each of us has a personal leadership style and leadership journey. This is shaped by personal values and culture. The next sessions in the leadership journey series focus on defining culture and values and how each connects to leadership. As we reflect on our own culture and leadership, we discuss how to engage in reaching health equity and building inclusive communities. Join us in this session for learning, reflection activities, and discussion. • Webinar 5: Cultural Perspectives on Self-Care in Leadership: How do you create an environment that is supportive of each person’s values and cultural perspectives on self-care? The purpose of this session is to explore person-driven approaches to self-care. We also share concrete and inclusive practices that emerging young leaders can adopt that embrace diverse perspectives and collective approaches to community and self-care. Videos and slides are provided.

Unconscious Bias: Do I Have the Tools to Recognize It and Speak Up?. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Region IV Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): Leonie Gordon, MD. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: Unconscious bias refers to the biases we hold that are not in our conscious control. Research shows that these biases can adversely affect key decisions in the workplace. The session enables you to work towards reducing the effects of unconscious bias for yourself and within your organization. Using examples that you will be able to relate to, we help you to explore the link between implicit bias and the impact on the organization. The overall aim of the session is to provide participants with an understanding of the nature of Unconscious Bias and how it impacts on individual and group attitudes, behaviors and decision-making processes.

Learning Objectives: • Explain the source and function of unconscious bias. • Discuss how unconscious bias impacts on decision-making and relationships in the organization. • Develop strategies and techniques for reducing personal unconscious bias, as well as the unconscious bias that manifests in teams and across the organization. • Develop a strategy for individual action.

Measuring Health Disparities. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Michigan Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This interactive course focuses on some basic issues for public health practice -- how to understand, define and measure health disparity. This course examines the language of health disparity to come to some common understanding of what that term means, explains key measures of health disparity and shows how to calculate them. This course was originally released in 2005. Given its success as a foundational course, updates were made in 2017 for this new, web-based version.

Learning Objectives: By the end of the first content section (which includes Part I What are Health Disparities? and Part II Issues in Measuring Health Disparities), you will be able to: • Identify the dimensions of health disparity as described in Healthy People 2020 • List three definitions of health disparity. • Interpret health disparity in graphical representations of data. • Explain relative and absolute disparity. • Describe how reference groups can affect disparity measurement. By the end of the second content section (which includes Part III Measures of Health Disparities and Part IV Analytic Steps in Measuring Health Disparity), you will be able to: • Describe at least three complex measures of health disparities. • List strengths and weaknesses of at least three health disparity measures. •Summarize the analytic steps in measuring health disparity.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: 3 CHES; 3.3 CNE Contact Hours

Collaborating Across Cultures. Year Developed: 2017. Source: ASA Community of Applied Statisticians. Presenter(s): Charisse Kosova, M.Ad.Ed.. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: 62 minutes.

Annotation: Collaborating across cultures can add an interesting global perspective to the work we do, but intercultural communication also comes with unique challenges. This session explored some of the research-based dimensions of culture that lead to differences in work style preferences and communication styles across cultures. By analyzing mini case studies in which culture interfered with collaboration, this session also offered simple tips and recommended adaptations that can lead to more rewarding and productive collaboration across cultures. A video and presentation slides are available.

Nothing About Us Without Us: Growing Meaningful Youth Involvement in Your Organization. Year Developed: 2016. Source: University of Massachusetts Medical School, Transitions to Adulthood Center for Research. Presenter(s): Tania Duperoy, BA; Amanda Costa, BS. Type: Video. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: 56 minutes. List of webinars

Annotation: This webinar provides an overview of meaningful youth involvement in mental health service systems through the mechanisms of treatment planning/decision making, peer worker roles, participatory research and evaluation, and systems and service change, and discusses effective approaches for engaging young adults. A video and slides are available.

Introduction to Cultural Competency and Humility. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Wisconsin Center for Public Health Education and Training. Presenter(s): Jameela Ali, MPH. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Introductory. Length: n.a..

Annotation: The ever-increasing diversity of our communities in Wisconsin and across the nation warrants increased cultural awareness on the part of public health professionals. By understanding the importance of cultural awareness, cultural competence and cultural humility, public health professionals will be better equipped to eliminate the long-standing disparities in the health and mental health status of diverse racial, ethnic, and cultural groups. This module provides a basic foundation in the philosophy, values, and conceptual frameworks of cultural competence and cultural humility. 

Learning Objectives: • Increase awareness and appreciation for the cultural diversity of Wisconsin • Define and understand concepts of culture, cultural awareness, cultural humility, and cultural competence • Identify how to incorporate cultural humility into public health through practical application • Highlight capacities and skills necessary to work effectively across diverse cultures

Special Instructions: Requires Adobe Flash.

Exploring Implicit Bias in Interprofessional Education and Practice. Year Developed: 2015. Source: American Interprofessional Health Collaborative. Presenter(s): Dr. Margaret Stuber, Dr. Janice Sabin. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 60 minutes. Series landing page

Annotation: Implicit or unconscious assumptions and biases challenge collaborative work within interprofessional teams and affect health equity for the population. Although pattern recognition is used by all health care professionals in their work, the results of assumptions made on the basis of past experience can be a hazard to client’s health. Women can be undertreated for heart disease, wealthy people may not be tested for HIV, or people of certain cultures may be undertreated for pain. Similarly, assumptions about people in specific professional fields may shape the way we interact, limiting the efficacy of our teams. This webinar addressed the definition and science of implicit or unconscious bias, as well as its role in contributing to social determinants of health. It used case examples to illustrate how unconscious bias affects clinical care, and discussed the research in this field. It presented ways to mitigate the effects of unconscious bias in health care, including diverse input in clinical decision-making and team care. It discussed how these ideas and objectives can be incorporated effectively into interprofessional education.

Learning Objectives: • Review the science of implicit social cognition and define implicit associations. • Describe situations in which unconscious bias may affect clinical care. • Identify strategies to minimize the influence of unconscious bias on interactions with patients and other healthcare professionals.

Special Instructions: All individuals will be required to set up a learner profile through a guest account to register for AIHC educational activities. More information about this one-time process and how to register for AIHC webinars can be found at https://aihc-us.org/AIHCregistration.

Organizational Development: Race, Language, and Ethnicity Data Collection. Year Developed: 2014. Source: Family Voices and National Center for Family/Professional Partnerships. Presenter(s): Julie Lucerno. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: 58 minutes.

Annotation: Julie Lucero, PhD, MPH, presented on the collection of Race/Ethnicity and Language (REL) data. Collection of this data is important to tracking progress of health disparities across populations. Health disparities impact individual and family well-being throughout the United States by compounding and intersecting with traumatic life conditions such as the chronic strain of poverty and marginalization. The presentation included a brief history of health disparities and race/ethnicity categories; a description of why REL data are collected; and how to ask the questions. Facilitator: Trish Thomas, Family Voices; Speaker: Julie Lucero, PhD, MPH, Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of New Mexico (UNM) Health Sciences Center and the Associate Director of the Center for Participatory Research, and a senior fellow with the New Mexico Center for the Advancement of Research Engagement and Science on Health Disparities Center (NM CARES), a National Institute for Minority Health and Health Disparities funded center

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.