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Displaying records 1 through 6 of 6 found.

Measuring Health Disparities. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Michigan Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This interactive course focuses on some basic issues for public health practice -- how to understand, define and measure health disparity. This course examines the language of health disparity to come to some common understanding of what that term means, explains key measures of health disparity and shows how to calculate them. This course was originally released in 2005. Given its success as a foundational course, updates were made in 2017 for this new, web-based version.

Learning Objectives: By the end of the first content section (which includes Part I What are Health Disparities? and Part II Issues in Measuring Health Disparities), you will be able to: • Identify the dimensions of health disparity as described in Healthy People 2020 • List three definitions of health disparity. • Interpret health disparity in graphical representations of data. • Explain relative and absolute disparity. • Describe how reference groups can affect disparity measurement. By the end of the second content section (which includes Part III Measures of Health Disparities and Part IV Analytic Steps in Measuring Health Disparity), you will be able to: • Describe at least three complex measures of health disparities. • List strengths and weaknesses of at least three health disparity measures. •Summarize the analytic steps in measuring health disparity.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: 3 CHES; 3.3 CNE Contact Hours

Communicating with Participants. Year Developed: 2016. Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Service, WIC. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This Web-based course provides continuing education and resources that can be accessed by any WIC staff member. This self-paced, repeatable, and cost-effective course has been designed to assist in all areas of providing WIC nutrition services. There are 3 modules that make up the content for this course: Providing Quality Customer Service, Communicating with Limited Literacy Audiences and Working in a Multicultural Environment.

Learning Objectives: • Recognize the importance of using good communication skills with WIC customers. • Identify examples of quality customer service within a WIC clinic. • Identify examples of key strategies for communicating with limited literacy audiences. • Identify methods for providing nutrition education within a multicultural environment.

Special Instructions: Some users are experiencing trouble accessing these modules with updated Java. You may need to lower your Java security level to the lowest setting. We will post a message here when the modules will no longer require lower Java security. New users will receive password by email within 1-2 business days of registration.

Continuing Education: WIC Certificate [8/1/14-]

Community Health Needs Assessments: Getting More Value for Your Community and Your Hospital. Year Developed: 2015. Source: American Hospital Association and Association for Community Health Improvement. Presenter(s): Julius Green, CPA, JD; Colleen Milligan, MBA; Kyle Bird . Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 61 minutes.

Annotation: In addition to identifying priority health needs and aligning partners and resources to address community needs, community health needs assessments (CHNAs) are a vital tool for informing population health management. Your CHNA will provide valuable data to direct resources toward high-risk populations, identify opportunities to enhance care delivery, inform patient engagement initiatives and direct overall strategic planning. In this joint Hospitals in Pursuit of Excellence (HPOE) and Association for Community Health Improvement (ACHI) webinar, CHNA experts discuss ways to build upon your previous CHNA to bring more value to your community and your hospital. Specific examples are presented on how hospitals are using CHNAs to inform population health management initiatives and on the intersection between community health needs and care delivery.

Learning Objectives: • Understand research, reporting and timeline changes outlined in IRS Final Rules. • Identify methods to build upon prior CHNA. • Understand the value of CHNA findings to guide other strategic priorities. • Learn how to engage community partners in the CHNA process and ongoing population health initiatives. • Review data collection best practices to ensure community-wide representation. • Use health care utilization data to identify opportunities for service delivery enhancement. • Create implementation planning that demonstrates measureable impact.

Cultural Competence and Global Leadership. Year Developed: 2011. Source: Maternal & Child Health Public Health Leadership Institute. Presenter(s): David Steffen, PhD, Virginia Suarez, PhD. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: 60 minutes. Direct link

Annotation: The topic of global leadership and cultural competence becomes more important as work increasingly becomes global. This 60-minute slide presentation discusses the definition, key concepts and continuum of cultural competence, as well as the rationale for it and research on cultural differences and global leadership behaviors. Dr. Steffen discusses the difference between cultural competency and diversity, defining the “four layers” of diversity. Demographic trends within the U.S. and their significance are briefly touched on, as well as recent critical findings on health disparities. Leadership across cultures, Hofstede’s benchmark research, which identified five major dimensions on which cultures differ (Individualism vs Collectivism, Masculinity vs Femininity, Uncertainty Avoidance, Longterm Orientation, and Power Distance), is discussed in detail. Research findings from the GLOBE study are reviewed, in the context of global leadership attributes. The session addresses communication styles from different cultures as well as intercultural conflict styles and strategies to effectively resolve conflict.

Learning Objectives: • Define cultural competency and global leadership. • Understand research on cultural differences and global leadership behaviors. • Describe several intercultural conflict styles and strategies.

Special Instructions: To access this learning opportunity, scroll down on the landing page to “Cultural Competence and Global Leadership” leadership module and click on “View Module Presentation.”

Infusing Cultural and Linguistic Competence into Health Promotion Training. Year Developed: 2004. Source: Georgetown University, National Center for Cultural Competence. Presenter(s): Suzanne Bronheim, PhD; Tawara Goode. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 90 minutes (this learning opportunity is broken down into multiple sections so the user can learn at their own speed).

Annotation: This learning series discusses integrating cultural and linguistic competence into a health program framework. Six chapters address the rationale and framework for cultural competence, and its application to training personnel as well as in health agencies. The last chapter talks with people who have experienced cultural competence issues as well as MCH professionals’ work in the field around the topic. These discussions are framed around the topic of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

Learning Objectives: • Learn the rationale for cultural competence in primary care. • Describe a framework for cultural and linguistic competence. • Learn how to infuse cultural and linguistic competence into health promotion training.

Special Instructions: Click on the link chapter link to view videos.

Culture and Health Literacy: Case Studies in Culture and Health Literacy. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Webcast. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This online training discusses how inequalities in health information contribute to unequal treatment and health outcomes for some populations (health disparities) and what communities can do to close the gap and improve health literacy. Three local efforts to address the health literacy gap in Minnesota are discussed. These include: the ECHO Project (Emergency Preparedness with Cultural Communities), PhotoVoice, and the Urban Health Agenda Community Advisory Committee (UHACAC). These projects represent cutting-edge work related to health literacy targeting cultural groups.

Learning Objectives: • Identify innovative strategies that can improve health literacy among cultural groups. • Discuss successes and challenges in designing and implementing strategies to close the health information gap among cultural groups. • Describe what other communities are doing to close the health information gap among cultural groups. • List what steps can be taken to stimulate further discussion on this topic.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account.

Continuing Education: 0.1 CEU/CE

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.