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Displaying records 1 through 8 of 8 found.

Getting Our House in Order: Addressing Internal Racial Equity. Year Developed: 2019. Source: CityMatch. Presenter(s): Jessica Ehule; Ann Novias; Janet Jones;. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 91 minutes.

Annotation: The desire to achieve equity drives the reason why many of us work in the field of maternal and child health. Racial inequities are evident in health outcomes across the board. In addressing these disparities, organizations often neglect to assess how they may be contributing to the racial inequities we work so hard to eliminate. We are working within a system founded on principles to advance specific groups of people, while leaving others behind. This foundation has led to biases being present in our policies, procedures, and day-to-day interactions. The webinar features CityMatCH members Janet Jones of the Waco-McLennan County Public Health District, Ana Novais of the Rhode Island Department of Health, and Jessica Ehule, CityMatCH staff member. Join CityMatCH’s Equity Action group and CityLeaders Cohort 12 as we discuss the strategies used by these agencies to actualize racial equity with discussion about how leaders can be impactful in this work.

Leadership is a Journey: A Series for Youth Self-Advocates. Year Developed: 2018. Source: Family Voices and National Center for Family-Professional Partnerships. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: Series; various lengths.

Annotation: This webinar series for youth supports the identification of leadership as a journey and support understanding and learning in key leadership development areas. • Webinar 1 & 2: Knowing Yourself as a Leader: These webinars provide short leadership development sessions. These first sessions explore how personal reflection and self-assessment helps each of us increase our understanding of our personal leadership style. They provide examples of reflection and assessment activities and include personal experiences from advocates for youth. • Webinar 3 & 4: What is my Culture? What are my Values?: Each of us has a personal leadership style and leadership journey. This is shaped by personal values and culture. The next sessions in the leadership journey series focus on defining culture and values and how each connects to leadership. As we reflect on our own culture and leadership, we discuss how to engage in reaching health equity and building inclusive communities. Join us in this session for learning, reflection activities, and discussion. • Webinar 5: Cultural Perspectives on Self-Care in Leadership: How do you create an environment that is supportive of each person’s values and cultural perspectives on self-care? The purpose of this session is to explore person-driven approaches to self-care. We also share concrete and inclusive practices that emerging young leaders can adopt that embrace diverse perspectives and collective approaches to community and self-care. Videos and slides are provided.

Measuring Health Disparities. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Michigan Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This interactive course focuses on some basic issues for public health practice -- how to understand, define and measure health disparity. This course examines the language of health disparity to come to some common understanding of what that term means, explains key measures of health disparity and shows how to calculate them. This course was originally released in 2005. Given its success as a foundational course, updates were made in 2017 for this new, web-based version.

Learning Objectives: By the end of the first content section (which includes Part I What are Health Disparities? and Part II Issues in Measuring Health Disparities), you will be able to: • Identify the dimensions of health disparity as described in Healthy People 2020 • List three definitions of health disparity. • Interpret health disparity in graphical representations of data. • Explain relative and absolute disparity. • Describe how reference groups can affect disparity measurement. By the end of the second content section (which includes Part III Measures of Health Disparities and Part IV Analytic Steps in Measuring Health Disparity), you will be able to: • Describe at least three complex measures of health disparities. • List strengths and weaknesses of at least three health disparity measures. •Summarize the analytic steps in measuring health disparity.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: 3 CHES; 3.3 CNE Contact Hours

Collaborating Across Cultures. Year Developed: 2017. Source: ASA Community of Applied Statisticians. Presenter(s): Charisse Kosova, M.Ad.Ed.. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: 62 minutes.

Annotation: Collaborating across cultures can add an interesting global perspective to the work we do, but intercultural communication also comes with unique challenges. This session explored some of the research-based dimensions of culture that lead to differences in work style preferences and communication styles across cultures. By analyzing mini case studies in which culture interfered with collaboration, this session also offered simple tips and recommended adaptations that can lead to more rewarding and productive collaboration across cultures. A video and presentation slides are available.

Introduction to Cultural Competency and Humility. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Wisconsin Center for Public Health Education and Training. Presenter(s): Jameela Ali, MPH. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Introductory. Length: n.a..

Annotation: The ever-increasing diversity of our communities in Wisconsin and across the nation warrants increased cultural awareness on the part of public health professionals. By understanding the importance of cultural awareness, cultural competence and cultural humility, public health professionals will be better equipped to eliminate the long-standing disparities in the health and mental health status of diverse racial, ethnic, and cultural groups. This module provides a basic foundation in the philosophy, values, and conceptual frameworks of cultural competence and cultural humility. 

Learning Objectives: • Increase awareness and appreciation for the cultural diversity of Wisconsin • Define and understand concepts of culture, cultural awareness, cultural humility, and cultural competence • Identify how to incorporate cultural humility into public health through practical application • Highlight capacities and skills necessary to work effectively across diverse cultures

Special Instructions: Requires Adobe Flash.

Cultural Competence and Global Leadership. Year Developed: 2011. Source: Maternal & Child Health Public Health Leadership Institute. Presenter(s): David Steffen, PhD, Virginia Suarez, PhD. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: 60 minutes. Direct link

Annotation: The topic of global leadership and cultural competence becomes more important as work increasingly becomes global. This 60-minute slide presentation discusses the definition, key concepts and continuum of cultural competence, as well as the rationale for it and research on cultural differences and global leadership behaviors. Dr. Steffen discusses the difference between cultural competency and diversity, defining the “four layers” of diversity. Demographic trends within the U.S. and their significance are briefly touched on, as well as recent critical findings on health disparities. Leadership across cultures, Hofstede’s benchmark research, which identified five major dimensions on which cultures differ (Individualism vs Collectivism, Masculinity vs Femininity, Uncertainty Avoidance, Longterm Orientation, and Power Distance), is discussed in detail. Research findings from the GLOBE study are reviewed, in the context of global leadership attributes. The session addresses communication styles from different cultures as well as intercultural conflict styles and strategies to effectively resolve conflict.

Learning Objectives: • Define cultural competency and global leadership. • Understand research on cultural differences and global leadership behaviors. • Describe several intercultural conflict styles and strategies.

Special Instructions: To access this learning opportunity, scroll down on the landing page to “Cultural Competence and Global Leadership” leadership module and click on “View Module Presentation.”

Infusing Cultural and Linguistic Competence into Health Promotion Training. Year Developed: 2004. Source: Georgetown University, National Center for Cultural Competence. Presenter(s): Suzanne Bronheim, PhD; Tawara Goode. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 90 minutes (this learning opportunity is broken down into multiple sections so the user can learn at their own speed).

Annotation: This learning series discusses integrating cultural and linguistic competence into a health program framework. Six chapters address the rationale and framework for cultural competence, and its application to training personnel as well as in health agencies. The last chapter talks with people who have experienced cultural competence issues as well as MCH professionals’ work in the field around the topic. These discussions are framed around the topic of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

Learning Objectives: • Learn the rationale for cultural competence in primary care. • Describe a framework for cultural and linguistic competence. • Learn how to infuse cultural and linguistic competence into health promotion training.

Special Instructions: Click on the link chapter link to view videos.

LGBTQ+ Cultural Humility Training for Health Center Staff. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: Michigan Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): Mo Connolly, MD; Kathy Fessler, MD; and Leslie Nicholas, ND. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: self paced.

Annotation: This course builds upon an introduction to LGBTQ+ cultural humility concepts and practices for health clinic staff. This course was created by Michigan Forward in Enhancing Research and Community Equity (MFierce), a coalition of public health researchers, LGBTQ+ Youth Advisors, and community-based organizations working to reduce the burden of STIs in LGBTQ+ communities. This course covers the following topics: introduction to LGBTQ+ populations; desire, behavior, identities; gender and gender expression; sex assigned at birth; cultural competence versus cultural humility; elements of cultural humility practice; and examples of culturally humble practices. This course features testimonials from providers with extensive experience working with LGBTQ+ youth: Mo Connolly, MD; Kathy Fessler, MD; and Leslie Nicholas, ND. It also features testimonials from LGBTQ+ youth on experiences with culturally humble care: Zach Crutchfield, Marcos Carillo, Rama Arjita-Pollard, and Artemis Gorde.

Learning Objectives: • Identify LGBTQ+ cultural humility practices. (CHES Areas of Responsibility 2.3.4, 2.3.5). • Describe LGBTQ+ cultural humility concepts. (2.3.4, 2.3.5).

Continuing Education: 1.0 Nursing Contact Hours (expires December 31, 2018); 1.0 CHES Category 1 CECH, Certificate of completion; $3 charge for CE credits

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.