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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 12 found.

State Approaches to Addressing Health Disparities. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Conference of State Legislatures and Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. Presenter(s): Shavon Arline-Bradley; Jim Abeler, Sarah Hernandez. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 58 minutes.

Annotation: Health disparities—differences in health and health care experienced by groups based on social, economic and environmental factors—persist across the nation. Each year, health disparities lead to significant human and financial costs, as certain people experience poorer living conditions, worse health status and treatment outcomes, and more difficulty accessing health care services than their peers in other population groups. State legislators have pursued various policy approaches to reduce health disparities in their communities and states. Through legislative tracking, NCSL has identified multiple strategies being pursued by states, including increasing workforce diversity, improving cultural competence in health care services and addressing the social determinants of health. This webinar, sponsored by NCSL and the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, discusses why state policymakers may consider addressing health disparities, and explore state policy approaches and examples.

Measuring Health Disparities. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Michigan Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This interactive course focuses on some basic issues for public health practice -- how to understand, define and measure health disparity. This course examines the language of health disparity to come to some common understanding of what that term means, explains key measures of health disparity and shows how to calculate them. This course was originally released in 2005. Given its success as a foundational course, updates were made in 2017 for this new, web-based version.

Learning Objectives: By the end of the first content section (which includes Part I What are Health Disparities? and Part II Issues in Measuring Health Disparities), you will be able to: • Identify the dimensions of health disparity as described in Healthy People 2020 • List three definitions of health disparity. • Interpret health disparity in graphical representations of data. • Explain relative and absolute disparity. • Describe how reference groups can affect disparity measurement. By the end of the second content section (which includes Part III Measures of Health Disparities and Part IV Analytic Steps in Measuring Health Disparity), you will be able to: • Describe at least three complex measures of health disparities. • List strengths and weaknesses of at least three health disparity measures. •Summarize the analytic steps in measuring health disparity.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: 3 CHES; 3.3 CNE Contact Hours

Influencing Change in Public and Organizational Policy in Support of Cultural Diversity and Cultural and Linguistic Competence. Year Developed: 2015. Source: National Center for Cultural Competence. Presenter(s): Diana Autin, Tawara D. Goode, Andy Imparato, Thomas Uno. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: This "Web-based Learning and Reflection" forum is designed to share examples from organizations that have recognized their own limitations in promoting cultural diversity and advancing and sustaining cultural and linguistic competence within human services, or those within the systems in which they are involved, related to the lack of cultural diversity and marginal attention that is given to fostering cultural and linguistic competence.

Learning Objectives: • Define a model of cultural competence including the role of policy in its implementation. • Define linguistic competence (Goode & Jones framework). • Cite legal mandates and requirements (policy directives) for language access for individuals with limited English proficiency. • Describe three approaches to influence change in organizational and public policy that promote cultural diversity and advance and sustain cultural and linguistic competence. • Reflect on the role of leadership in bringing about such change.

Engaging and Partnering with Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Communities. Year Developed: 2015. Source: National Center for Cultural Competence. Presenter(s): Wendy Jones, Barbara Hueler. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Advanced. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: Establishing and sustaining broad-based community partnerships in support of the full inclusion of and equity for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) present myriad benefits while simultaneously presenting unique challenges. Many organizations and programs within the I/DD network continue to struggle with engaging communities in a culturally and linguistically competent manner. This forum explores the experiences of organizations in Arizona, California, and Maryland in their successful initiatives to engage African American, Chinese, and Latino/Hispanic communities in support of people with intellectual and development disabilities across the lifespan.

Learning Objectives: • Examine the conceptual frameworks, values, and practices of cultural and linguistic competence within the context of community engagement. • Describe approaches and strategies to engage diverse communities to plan, implement, and evaluate services and supports for individuals who experience developmental and other disabilities and their families. • Reflect on the role of leadership in bringing about organizational and system change.

Addressing Disparities and Disproportionality in Systems Serving Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. Year Developed: 2015. Source: National Center for Cultural Competence. Presenter(s): Diana Autin, Tawara D. Goode, Andy Imparato, Thomas Uno. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Advanced. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: This forum explores contributing factors to disparities and disproportionality and what three organizations are doing at the policy and practice levels to mitigate them. It begins with a discussion on how, when compared to non-Hispanic Whites, members of other racial and ethnic groups continue to be adversely impacted by health and health care disparities. It continues by exploring the overrepresentation of students primarily African American and most recently Latino in special education and children and youth with disabilities (across racial and ethnic groups) who are disproportionately placed in this nation’s juvenile justice system.

Learning Objectives: • Define and differentiate between health and health care disparities. • Define disproportionality and overrepresentation. • Cite the impact of disparities and disproportionality on individuals with disabilities and their families. • List three approaches to combat or mitigate health/health care disparities and disproportionality in education and juvenile justice. • Reflect on the role of leadership in bringing about change.

Mentoring in Our Lives: The Voices of Students and Maternal and Child Health Professionals. Year Developed: 2014. Source: Georgetown University, National Center for Cultural Competence. Presenter(s): Harolyn Belcher, MD, MHS; Christine Chan; Lucy Guevara; Stacy Hodgkinson, PhD; Kristin Hunt, PhD; Michael Jenkins, MPH; Sabrina Roundtree; Damian Waters. Type: Video. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: Fifty-three videos ranging in length from 28 seconds to 5 minutes, 29 seconds each.

Annotation: This resource offers excerpts from interviews with students and maternal and child health professionals from racial and ethnic groups underrepresented in MCH Training programs telling their own stories about the role mentoring has played in their lives. Their stories reflect themes similar to those identified in the literature review completed for this project and in previous conversations with students and junior faculty. Their stories bring the literature findings to life and present the importance of mentoring in their respective journeys to becoming healthcare and public health professionals.

Special Instructions: Scroll to Stories That Bring the Literature to Life and select a topic, then interviewee.

Bridging Gaps: The Vital Role of Cultural Competence in Healthcare. Year Developed: 2014. Source: University at Albany School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Wilma Alvarado-Little, M.A., M.S.W. and James O’Barr, M.S.W.. Type: Video. Level: Advanced Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Health disparities have been identified among racial and ethnic minorities within the United States. These disparities have been linked to health beliefs and behaviors, access to care, and quality of health care services. Cultural competency is one area in healthcare training that addresses health disparities by creating awareness of sociocultural and racial bias among medical and public health professionals. Jeannette South-Paul and Robert Like have stated in, Cultural Competence for the Health Workforce, "Evidence of cultural (racial, ethnic, and religious, among other determinants) discordance between health care providers and the populations they serve suggests that every member of the health workforce must understand and implement culturally competent care as the foundation for improving the quality of services delivered". Bridging Gaps: The Vital Role of Cultural Competence in Healthcare presents fundamental concepts on cultural and linguistic competence for medical and public health professionals. This webcast demonstrates why cultural and linguistic competence is important and how it can facilitate dialogue, awareness, and learning to address diverse healthcare needs. This webcast is part of the training series “Advancing Cultural Competence in the Public Health and Health Care Workforce”. More information can be found at www.advancingcc.org.

Learning Objectives: • Recognize the benefits of culturally and linguistically appropriate health services. • Describe methods for providing culturally and linguistically appropriate health services. • Explain why providing culturally competent care is essential to improving overall individual and population-based health outcomes.

Engaging Communities in Public Health Research, Practice and Policy. Year Developed: 2013. Source: University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Byllye Avery, MEd; Amy Jo Schulz, PhD. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Intermediate. Length: Self-paced. List of all courses

Annotation: This training focuses on effective methods for engaging minority and other communities in health research, practice, and policy. Topics discussed include community and policy level strategies to reduce health disparities as well as how to implement effective research, policies, and practices that reduce health disparities.

Learning Objectives: • Identify how to effectively engage communities in public health work, such as needs assessments, policy implementation, and advocacy. • Identify ways researchers, health professionals, advocates, and citizens can work together to reduce health disparities.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account.

Continuing Education: 0.25 CEU/CE; 3 CPH Recertification Credits

Historical Trauma and Generational Trauma: Significance and Response (Lessons from the Field: Traumatic Stress Series). Year Developed: 2012. Source: University of Minnesota Extension, Children, Youth & Family Consortium. Presenter(s): Atum Azzahir; BraVada Garrett-Akinsanya, PhD; Jessica Gourneau; Melissa Walls, PhD . Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: Series; various lengths.

Annotation: This training discusses the historical and generational trauma from the perspective of American Indians and African Americans and builds on Dr. Karina Walter’s presentation (see Historical Trauma, Microaggressions, and Identity: A Framework for Culturally-Based Practice). A panel of community and university professionals discuss cultural ways of knowing, how healing and wellness take place within families and communities, and where the science of historical and intergenerational trauma currently exists. The training consists of a video (74 minutes) and presentation notes by each author. This Lesson from the Field aims to facilitate professionals’ use of a broad and inclusive lens in their work with children, youth, and families impacted by historical and generational trauma to restore and promote cultural identity and promote healing and wellness.

Learning Objectives: • Understand approaches to historical and generational trauma from community, science, and historical perspectives. • Define a theory of “sickness” and the impact of loss of culture and community on individual health and healing. • Identify the impact of historical and intergenerational trauma on communities, families, and individuals. • Incorporate cultural ways of knowing and healing for individuals, families, and communities.

Considering Cultural Competence in the Context of Public Health. Year Developed: 2012. Source: Center for Puerto Rican Studies-Centro. Presenter(s): Diana Romero PhD, MA; Elena Hoeppner, MPH; Andrea Skowronek, RD, MPH. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Introductory. Length: 40 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar introduces a module/educational program in cultural competency specifically for public health professionals. Examples of disparities in health outcomes is addressed as well as tools to become culturally competent public health providers.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.