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Displaying records 21 through 27 of 27 found.

Bridging Gaps: The Vital Role of Cultural Competence in Healthcare. Year Developed: 2014. Source: University at Albany School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Wilma Alvarado-Little, M.A., M.S.W. and James O’Barr, M.S.W.. Type: Video. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Health disparities have been identified among racial and ethnic minorities within the United States. These disparities have been linked to health beliefs and behaviors, access to care, and quality of health care services. Cultural competency is one area in healthcare training that addresses health disparities by creating awareness of sociocultural and racial bias among medical and public health professionals. Jeannette South-Paul and Robert Like have stated in, Cultural Competence for the Health Workforce, "Evidence of cultural (racial, ethnic, and religious, among other determinants) discordance between health care providers and the populations they serve suggests that every member of the health workforce must understand and implement culturally competent care as the foundation for improving the quality of services delivered". Bridging Gaps: The Vital Role of Cultural Competence in Healthcare presents fundamental concepts on cultural and linguistic competence for medical and public health professionals. This webcast demonstrates why cultural and linguistic competence is important and how it can facilitate dialogue, awareness, and learning to address diverse healthcare needs. This webcast is part of the training series “Advancing Cultural Competence in the Public Health and Health Care Workforce”. More information can be found at www.advancingcc.org.

Learning Objectives: • Recognize the benefits of culturally and linguistically appropriate health services. • Describe methods for providing culturally and linguistically appropriate health services. • Explain why providing culturally competent care is essential to improving overall individual and population-based health outcomes.

Understanding Immigration and Refugee Trauma: What Do We Know and How Do We Intervene? (Lessons from the Field: Traumatic Stress Series). Year Developed: 2013. Source: University of Minnesota Extension, Children, Youth & Family Consortium. Presenter(s): Carolyn Garcia, PhD; Amirthini Keefe; Andrea Northwood, PhD, LP. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: Series; various lengths.

Annotation: This training describes how child and adolescent professionals address health and education inequities and health disparities in ways that promote mental health, personal safety, and educational success for immigrant children and youth. Presenters discussed traumatic stresses associated with immigration and different approaches and interventions, such as a photo-voice project with Hispanic youth to promote mental health. The training consists of a video (165 minutes), presentation notes, and other materials. This Lesson from the Field aims to facilitate professionals’ use of a broad and inclusive lens in their work with children, youth, and families impacted by homelessness by restoring and promoting emotional and psychological safety and promoting healing and wellness.

Learning Objectives: • Identify a framework for understanding the complex context in which families immigrate to Minnesota; to the U.S. • Describe how experiences and resources differ between immigrants living in urban versus rural communities. • Identify reasons that immigrant youth and families experience educational and health inequities and disparities.

American Indian Public Health Disparities: Regional Differences in Health. Year Developed: 2013. Source: Empire State Public Health Training Center and University at Albany School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Donald K. Warne, MD, PhD. Type: Video. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This broadcast addresses a number of relevant topics surrounding public health disparities and American Indian populations. Specifically, this broadcast includes a brief review of current American Indian Health Policies and a discussion of disparities that exist in health resources for American Indians. Dr. Warne reviews key health disparities that exist among and between American Indian populations as well as regional differences in health. Finally, Dr. Warne presents policy and program strategies intended to reduce the existing disparities.

Historical Trauma and Generational Trauma: Significance and Response (Lessons from the Field: Traumatic Stress Series). Year Developed: 2012. Source: University of Minnesota Extension, Children, Youth & Family Consortium. Presenter(s): Atum Azzahir; BraVada Garrett-Akinsanya, PhD; Jessica Gourneau; Melissa Walls, PhD . Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: Series; various lengths. Part 2

Annotation: This training discusses the historical and generational trauma from the perspective of American Indians and African Americans and builds on Dr. Karina Walter’s presentation (see Historical Trauma, Microaggressions, and Identity: A Framework for Culturally-Based Practice). A panel of community and university professionals discuss cultural ways of knowing, how healing and wellness take place within families and communities, and where the science of historical and intergenerational trauma currently exists. The training consists of a video (74 minutes) and presentation notes by each author. This Lesson from the Field aims to facilitate professionals’ use of a broad and inclusive lens in their work with children, youth, and families impacted by historical and generational trauma to restore and promote cultural identity and promote healing and wellness.

Learning Objectives: • Understand approaches to historical and generational trauma from community, science, and historical perspectives. • Define a theory of “sickness” and the impact of loss of culture and community on individual health and healing. • Identify the impact of historical and intergenerational trauma on communities, families, and individuals. • Incorporate cultural ways of knowing and healing for individuals, families, and communities.

Considering Cultural Competence in the Context of Public Health. Year Developed: 2012. Source: Center for Puerto Rican Studies-Centro. Presenter(s): Diana Romero PhD, MA; Elena Hoeppner, MPH; Andrea Skowronek, RD, MPH. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 40 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar introduces a module/educational program in cultural competency specifically for public health professionals. Examples of disparities in health outcomes is addressed as well as tools to become culturally competent public health providers.

Ready, Willing and Able Online Training. Year Developed: 2010. Source: University of Kansas Research and Training Center on Independent Living and the Kansas Dept. of Health & Environment. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Advanced. Length: 120 minutes.

Annotation: This course is designed for the public health, hospital, preparedness, emergency response and disaster relief workforce. Specific training covers disability etiquette, terminology, and communications and assistance techniques during disasters for assisting people with disabilities. The course covers various disaster assistance needs of persons with sight, mobility, hearing and cognitive disabilities. Instruction is given in the video by professional educators with one educator being a person with a disability to enhance the experience of acquainting the audience with disabilities.

Learning Objectives: • Describe different needs populations. • Use correct terminology. • Describe methods to approach persons with disabilities. • Gain skills to better perform your duties. • Describe the characteristics and needs of individuals with disabilities. • Acquire knowledge of best practices. • Provide the best possible outcome for the client/consumer, the responder, and the receiver in the event of a natural or bioterrorist disaster. • Describe the public health role in emergency response in a range of emergencies that might arise. • Describe individual functional role(s) in emergency response and demonstrate the role(s) in regular drills. • Describe communication role(s) in emergency response within the agency, using established communication systems for the agency, general public, personnel, and media. • Identify limits to own knowledge, skills, and authority, and identify key systems for referring matters that exceed these limits. • Apply creative problem solving and flexible thinking to unusual challenges within an individuals functional responsibility and evaluate effectiveness of all actions taken.

Special Instructions: After completing the course and evaluation a certificate of completion will be available through the 'Certificate' link on the right handside of the homepage. 1. This online course will take 2 hrs to complete and includes a pre/post assessment, video, an evaluation and course certificate. 2. Use Internet Explorer or Google Chrome as your browser and high speed Internet service 3. Turn OFF your pop-up blockers 4.Test the compatiblity of your computer for taking this online course: » Click the help button located on the TRAIN Navigation taskbar » Left-hand menu select 'Test Your Environment', Run Test button » All of the checkmarks should be GREEN » If any of the links are RED, click the link and follow the prompts

Infusing Cultural and Linguistic Competence into Health Promotion Training. Year Developed: 2004. Source: Georgetown University, National Center for Cultural Competence. Presenter(s): Suzanne Bronheim, PhD; Tawara Goode. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 90 minutes (this learning opportunity is broken down into multiple sections so the user can learn at their own speed).

Annotation: This learning series discusses integrating cultural and linguistic competence into a health program framework. Six chapters address the rationale and framework for cultural competence, and its application to training personnel as well as in health agencies. The last chapter talks with people who have experienced cultural competence issues as well as MCH professionals’ work in the field around the topic. These discussions are framed around the topic of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

Learning Objectives: • Learn the rationale for cultural competence in primary care. • Describe a framework for cultural and linguistic competence. • Learn how to infuse cultural and linguistic competence into health promotion training.

Special Instructions: Click on the link chapter link to view videos.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $225,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.