Edit Your Search

Level:

Accessible:

Continuing Education:


New Search

Search Results

Search Results

Displaying records 1 through 10 of 21 found.

Community Development as a Partner for Health Equity. Year Developed: 2018. Source: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families & Communities, Maternal and Child Health Life Course Research Network (LCRN). Presenter(s): Douglas Jutte, MD, MPH; Daniel Lau, MPH. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 15 minutes.

Annotation: Through this webinar, the Build Healthy Places Network provides an overview of the community development sector, a multi-billion-dollar sector that serves as an action arm for addressing social determinants of health through the development and financing of affordable housing, grocery stores, community centers, health clinics, and services in low- and moderate-income communities. The overview focuses on the sector’s alignment with the health equity goals of public health, shared measurement strategies, and emerging opportunities for cross-sector collaboration.

Special Instructions: This link goes to a preview; to view the full video, download it or add it to your dropbox.

Using Social Determinants of Health to Inform Fatality Review. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Center for Fatality Review and Prevention. Presenter(s): Madelyn Reyes, MA, MPA, RN, Jola Crear-Perry, MD, FACOG, Susan Hurtado. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Social determinants of health are conditions in the environments in which people are born, live, learn, work, play, worship, and age that affect a wide range of health, functioning, and quality-of-life outcomes and risks. Child Death Review (CDR) and Fetal and Infant Mortality Review (FIMR) programs work to understand health care systems and social problems that contribute to fetal, infant, and child deaths and to identify and implement systems improvement and interventions to improve the lives of some of our most vulnerable women, infants, children, and families. Keeping a Social Determinants of Health lens while conducting fatality review is a step toward reducing inequities in these vital health outcomes.

Special Instructions: Password: sdoh

State Approaches to Addressing Health Disparities. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Conference of State Legislatures and Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. Presenter(s): Shavon Arline-Bradley; Jim Abeler, Sarah Hernandez. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 58 minutes.

Annotation: Health disparities—differences in health and health care experienced by groups based on social, economic and environmental factors—persist across the nation. Each year, health disparities lead to significant human and financial costs, as certain people experience poorer living conditions, worse health status and treatment outcomes, and more difficulty accessing health care services than their peers in other population groups. State legislators have pursued various policy approaches to reduce health disparities in their communities and states. Through legislative tracking, NCSL has identified multiple strategies being pursued by states, including increasing workforce diversity, improving cultural competence in health care services and addressing the social determinants of health. This webinar, sponsored by NCSL and the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, discusses why state policymakers may consider addressing health disparities, and explore state policy approaches and examples.

Measuring Health Disparities. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Michigan Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This interactive course focuses on some basic issues for public health practice -- how to understand, define and measure health disparity. This course examines the language of health disparity to come to some common understanding of what that term means, explains key measures of health disparity and shows how to calculate them. This course was originally released in 2005. Given its success as a foundational course, updates were made in 2017 for this new, web-based version.

Learning Objectives: By the end of the first content section (which includes Part I What are Health Disparities? and Part II Issues in Measuring Health Disparities), you will be able to: • Identify the dimensions of health disparity as described in Healthy People 2020 • List three definitions of health disparity. • Interpret health disparity in graphical representations of data. • Explain relative and absolute disparity. • Describe how reference groups can affect disparity measurement. By the end of the second content section (which includes Part III Measures of Health Disparities and Part IV Analytic Steps in Measuring Health Disparity), you will be able to: • Describe at least three complex measures of health disparities. • List strengths and weaknesses of at least three health disparity measures. •Summarize the analytic steps in measuring health disparity.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: 3 CHES; 3.3 CNE Contact Hours

Improving Systems of Care for Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs and Autism Spectrum Disorder. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Conference of State Legislatures. Presenter(s): Tahra Johnson; Michelle Jarvis; Shawna Wright; Thomas Holmes; Susan Lontine. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 58 minutes.

Annotation: Children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN) are defined as children who have or are at increased risk for a chronic physical, developmental, behavioral, or emotional condition and who also require health and related services of a type or amount beyond that required by children generally. For this population of children, there are often barriers to accessing treatment from a shortage of providers to lack of coverage. This webinar explores barriers to accessing care and discusses strategies that states can implement to improve systems of care for Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs (CYSHCN) and those with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Center for Interprofessional Practice and Education. Presenter(s): Barbara Brandt, Patricia A. Cuff, Sandra D. Lane, Julian Fisher, Bianca Frogner. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 61 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar discusses how each speaker has used and implemented specific aspects of the Framework including: • a description of Interprofessional courses built upon the social determinants of health concept, that utilizes innovative teaching methods and actively engages members of the community for educating students; • an illustration of how a medical education department is finding ways to integrate the framework into the curriculum for health professional training in rural and underserved areas of the Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana and Idaho region; • a description of WHO’s efforts to integrate SDH into health workforce education and training to prepare for integrated people-centered health services, how SDH / IPE are addressed, and how this links to the framework & conceptual model. The Framework was published by the Institute of Medicine in 2016.

The Development of Self-Regulation: Foundational Skills for Children's Health and Well-Being. Year Developed: 2016. Source: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families & Communities, Maternal and Child Health Life Course Research Network (LCRN). Presenter(s): Megan McClelland, PhD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar, addresses the importance of self-regulation for health, educational success, and well-being over time and across contexts. It also examines the pathways of self-regulatory development (including individual, contextual and sociocultural factors that influence the development of these skills over time), the methods for studying self-regulation, and translational issues such as intervention efforts to improve these skills in children.

Learning Objectives: • Define self-regulation. • Discuss the importance of self-regulation for health, educational success, and well-being. • Describe factors that influence the development of self-regulation. • Learn methods for studying self-regulation. • Discuss intervention efforts to improve self-regulation.

Listening Before We Speak: Understanding Our Audience in Times of Disaster #SomosSocial . Year Developed: 2016. Source: Federal Emergency Management Agency, Digitalgov. Presenter(s): Daniel Llargues, Lucia Castro Herrera. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: 57 minutes.

Annotation: Who is the audience? What is the social conversation? Those are the most common questions that tools like social listening can address to better understand your audience and their needs. Listening to the needs and concerns of your audience, and understanding how they use social media ultimately helps drive more informed content strategy and better allows us to be a part of the conversation. In times of disaster, the specific needs and ways to communicate with English speaking communities and Spanish speaking communities sometimes are different and often confused. In this webinar we will share our experience implementing social listening as a tool directed to our Spanish speaking audience and how to partner with other reliable sources to provide relevant content at every stage of the disaster. In addition, we will share lessons learned and best practices about our engagement. The webinar is aimed at: Anyone interested in social listening for Spanish speaking markets in the United States Digital and social media managers with content responsibilities in Spanish Anyone interested in social media, disasters and communications with limited English proficiency communities

From Concepts to Practice: Health Equity, Health Inequities, Health Disparities, and Social Determinants of Health. Year Developed: 2016. Source: Region 2 Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Web Trainig Self Study. Level: Introductory. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This module is meant to give the participant a broad overview of health equity, health inequities, health disparities and social determinants of health. It reviews definitions of each as well as examples based on the standards of Healthy People 2020. It also provides suggestions for action for public health professionals. This module was developed in collaboration with the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene Center for Health Equity.

Learning Objectives: • Define key concepts, including health equity, health inequities, health disparities, and social determinants of health. • Explain the relationship between health equity, health inequities, health disparities, and social determinants of health. • Compare and contrast the concepts of health equity, health inequities, health disparities, and social determinants of health. •List appropriate strategies that public health professionals can use to address health disparities and social determinants of health in order to achieve health equity. •Appreciate the importance of using strategies to advance health equity.

Special Instructions: This course is best viewed on Chrome or Firefox browsers.

Introduction to Cultural Competency and Humility. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Wisconsin Center for Public Health Education and Training. Presenter(s): Jameela Ali, MPH. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Introductory. Length: n.a..

Annotation: The ever-increasing diversity of our communities in Wisconsin and across the nation warrants increased cultural awareness on the part of public health professionals. By understanding the importance of cultural awareness, cultural competence and cultural humility, public health professionals will be better equipped to eliminate the long-standing disparities in the health and mental health status of diverse racial, ethnic, and cultural groups. This module provides a basic foundation in the philosophy, values, and conceptual frameworks of cultural competence and cultural humility. 

Learning Objectives: • Increase awareness and appreciation for the cultural diversity of Wisconsin • Define and understand concepts of culture, cultural awareness, cultural humility, and cultural competence • Identify how to incorporate cultural humility into public health through practical application • Highlight capacities and skills necessary to work effectively across diverse cultures

Special Instructions: Requires Adobe Flash.

Next »

New Search

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.