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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 14 found.

The Water of Systems Change Approach: Connecting the Dots for Health Equity, Racial Justice, and Social Determinants of Health. Year Developed: 2022. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): Alex Monge, Leslie DeRosset, Nakenge Robertson. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 45 minutes.

Annotation: In this webinar, members of the National MCH Workforce Development Center explain the basics of the Water of Systems Change (WSC) framework and how it is used as an organizing theory for state and local health departments to organize their efforts in addressing disparities and racism while advancing other social determinants of health (SDOH). The presenters also engage participants in a discussion and brainstorming session of how these approaches can be applied and taught in academic programs. This webinar also explores a new concept — From the Concept to the Concrete to the Classroom — where presenters link conceptual models to what's happening in the field and then bring it full-circle to show how current and future faculty may incorporate new frameworks and implementation practices into academic programs.

Learning Objectives: • Explain the six conditions of the WSC framework. • Identify activities that state and local health departments funded by Title V are using to advance health equity, racial justice, and SDOH. • Expand on ideas generated about how to incorporate the WSC framework into academic settings.

Continuing Education: ATMCH has secured 1.0 CPH credit for participating in either the webinar or webinar archive. For more information, email Julie McDougal at jmcdouga@uab.edu.

Community Health Justice: Working to Ensure Health Equity in Care Delivery. Year Developed: 2022. Source: Executives for Health Innovation. Presenter(s): Patricia Doykos, Danielle Jones, Annette Powers, Holly Spinks. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 65 minutes.

Annotation: As health delivery services evolve and technology advances, healthcare professionals must keep pushing for equity in healthcare. Providers, hospitals, researchers, pharmaceutical manufacturers, and health systems play vital roles in maintaining equity in care delivery. During this webinar, leading experts addressed the immediate actions and solutions that community health leaders and stakeholders can implement to help their populations maintain equity in health care services.

Learning Objectives: • Discuss the importance of continuing the needed push for equity in healthcare. • Learn solutions and implementation techniques to evolving health equity in care delivery.

Declaring Racism as a Public Health Crisis. Year Developed: 2021. Source: County Health Rankings and Roadmaps. Presenter(s): Renee Canady, Jannah Bierens, Jennifer Harris, Ericka Burroughs-Girardi, Selma Aly, Joanne Lee. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 59 minutes.

Annotation: There is a growing number of states and local jurisdictions declaring racism as a public health issue. What do these declarations mean and how are they helpful in advancing racial equity? How ready is the discipline/field of Public Health to actively respond to declarations? Presenters will explore these compelling questions and more in this webinar.

Learning Objectives: • Learn how racism influences health • Discuss root causes of health equity • Differentiate transactional versus transformative approaches • Review MATCH'S Racism Declaration Action Toolkit

Challenging Racist Systems, Processes, and Analyses in Social Care. Year Developed: 2021. Source: Social Interventions Research & Evaluation Network. Presenter(s): Megan Sandel, MD, MPH, Rhea Boyd, MD, MPH. Type: Podcast. Level: Introductory. Length: 29 minutes.

Annotation: This podcast features a conversation between Megan Sandel, MD, MPH, an associate professor of pediatrics at the Boston University Schools of Medicine and Public Health and co-lead principal investigator with Children’s Health Watch, and Rhea Boyd, MD, MPH, a pediatrician, public health advocate, and scholar who is the Director of Equity and Justice for The California Children’s Trust and most recently, co-developed THE CONVERSATION: Between Us, About Us, a national campaign to bring information about the COVID vaccines directly to Black communities.

Learning Objectives: • Understand the role of health care sector efforts to provide assistance to patients to reduce their social risks. • Explore ways in which social inequality has been encoded and medicalized in the conceptualization of social care. • Discuss ways to think differently about what “health equity” means.

Maternal, Child, and Adolescent Health Life Course Perspective, Practice, and Leadership Training Series. Year Developed: 2019. Source: Center of Excellence in Maternal, Child, and Adolescent Health; University of California, Berkley. Presenter(s): Michael Lu, MD, MS, MPH; Paula Braveman, MD, MPH; Kiko Malin, MSW/MPH; Anthony Iton, MD, JD, MPH; and Vijaya Hogan, MPH, DrPH. Moderated by Julianna Deardorff, PdD. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: 5 modules; self-paced. Registration link

Annotation: The Maternal, Child, and Adolescent Health (MCAH) Life Course Perspective, Practice, & Leadership course is designed to provide an understanding of life course perspective, its practical applications, and related leadership opportunities. The life course perspective is a conceptual framework for understanding health trajectories of populations over time. The life course perspective posits that broad social, economic, and environmental factors not only shape health and contribute to health outcomes but are also the underlying causes of inequities in a wide range of maternal and child health outcomes. This course first provides a brief summary of the development and central components of this perspective. Building off these foundational concepts, the course then focuses on practical applications of this perspective in both healthcare settings and public health interventions. Through interviews with leaders in the MCAH field, including clinicians, researchers, and public health practitioners, this course will highlight essential leadership knowledge and skills necessary to apply a life course perspective in practice. The course is self-directed, online, and open source, which allows participants to learn at their own speed and convenience free of charge. While the course is designed with clinical professionals and public health practitioners in mind, it is available to all learners including students and professionals in other fields.

Learning Objectives: Learning Objectives (comprehensive) By the end of the training series, participants will be able to: • Define and describe the life course perspective and its core concepts • Identify examples of how the life course perspective has been applied and implemented in practice settings across the MCAH field • Identify leadership knowledge and skills that support advancing a life course perspective in practice. • Apply life course perspective knowledge and leadership skills to individual professional development.

Special Instructions: Registration is required.

Using Social Determinants of Health to Inform Fatality Review. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Center for Fatality Review and Prevention. Presenter(s): Madelyn Reyes, MA, MPA, RN, Jola Crear-Perry, MD, FACOG, Susan Hurtado. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes. Webinar Slides

Annotation: Social determinants of health are conditions in the environments in which people are born, live, learn, work, play, worship, and age that affect a wide range of health, functioning, and quality-of-life outcomes and risks. Child Death Review (CDR) and Fetal and Infant Mortality Review (FIMR) programs work to understand health care systems and social problems that contribute to fetal, infant, and child deaths and to identify and implement systems improvement and interventions to improve the lives of some of our most vulnerable women, infants, children, and families. Keeping a Social Determinants of Health lens while conducting fatality review is a step toward reducing inequities in these vital health outcomes.

Special Instructions: Password: sdoh

Measuring Health Disparities. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Michigan Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This interactive course focuses on some basic issues for public health practice -- how to understand, define and measure health disparity. This course examines the language of health disparity to come to some common understanding of what that term means, explains key measures of health disparity and shows how to calculate them. This course was originally released in 2005. Given its success as a foundational course, updates were made in 2017 for this new, web-based version.

Learning Objectives: By the end of the first content section (which includes Part I What are Health Disparities? and Part II Issues in Measuring Health Disparities), you will be able to: • Identify the dimensions of health disparity as described in Healthy People 2020 • List three definitions of health disparity. • Interpret health disparity in graphical representations of data. • Explain relative and absolute disparity. • Describe how reference groups can affect disparity measurement. By the end of the second content section (which includes Part III Measures of Health Disparities and Part IV Analytic Steps in Measuring Health Disparity), you will be able to: • Describe at least three complex measures of health disparities. • List strengths and weaknesses of at least three health disparity measures. •Summarize the analytic steps in measuring health disparity.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: 3 CHES; 3.3 CNE Contact Hours

Managing Social Determinants of Health: A Framework for Identifying, Addressing Disparities in Medicaid Populations / A Conceptual and Analytical Framework for Identifying and Addressing the Social Determinants of Health in Medicaid Populations. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Health Management Associates and Disability Policy Consortium. Presenter(s): Ellen Breslin; Anissa Lambertino; Dennis Heaphy; Tony Dreyfus. Type: n.a.. Level: Advanced. Length: 60 minutes. Slides

Annotation: Social determinants of health are increasingly recognized by Medicaid programs as important drivers of poor health outcomes and disparities that lead to higher costs. In response, Medicaid programs are beginning to analyze social determinants of health as potential causes of health disparities. During this webinar, Ellen Breslin and Anissa Lambertino of HMA, Dennis Heaphy of the Disability Policy Consortium, and independent consultant Tony Dreyfus presented an analytical framework for understanding the impact social determinants of health have on Medicaid populations. Leveraging work done by the Institute of Medicine, the framework includes measures and statistical methods that Medicaid programs, health plans, and accountable care organizations can use to generate the type of information needed to develop interventions that improve health outcomes.

Learning Objectives: • Understand why social determinants of health are key to addressing health disparities and achieving the goals of payment and delivery system reform. • Learn about the value of population-based approaches for examining the relationship between social determinants of health and health disparities. • Find out what it takes to implement the type of framework, measures and statistical methods needed to effectively examine the importance of social determinants of health on health outcomes.

Data-driven Change at the Community Level: Emerging Research on Urban Child Health. Year Developed: 2017. Source: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Presenter(s): Renee D. Boynton-Jarrett, MD; ScDClaudia J. Coulton, PhD; Lisa M. Sontag-Padilla, PhD. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: The Health Resources and Services Administration’s Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) is pleased to announce a DataSpeak program on urban child health. This webinar focuses on socioemotional and environmental health and how three different programs are using data to drive community action and change for children in urban neighborhoods. Participants hear how researchers have developed datasets and dashboards from data sources that aren’t commonly combined and how they have balanced local and national data to tell stories about neighborhoods, childhood experiences and health outcomes.

A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Center for Interprofessional Practice and Education. Presenter(s): Barbara Brandt, Patricia A. Cuff, Sandra D. Lane, Julian Fisher, Bianca Frogner. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 61 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar discusses how each speaker has used and implemented specific aspects of the Framework including: • a description of Interprofessional courses built upon the social determinants of health concept, that utilizes innovative teaching methods and actively engages members of the community for educating students; • an illustration of how a medical education department is finding ways to integrate the framework into the curriculum for health professional training in rural and underserved areas of the Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana and Idaho region; • a description of WHO’s efforts to integrate SDH into health workforce education and training to prepare for integrated people-centered health services, how SDH / IPE are addressed, and how this links to the framework & conceptual model. The Framework was published by the Institute of Medicine in 2016.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $225,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.