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Using Social Determinants of Health to Inform Fatality Review. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Center for Fatality Review and Prevention. Presenter(s): Madelyn Reyes, MA, MPA, RN, Jola Crear-Perry, MD, FACOG, Susan Hurtado. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Social determinants of health are conditions in the environments in which people are born, live, learn, work, play, worship, and age that affect a wide range of health, functioning, and quality-of-life outcomes and risks. Child Death Review (CDR) and Fetal and Infant Mortality Review (FIMR) programs work to understand health care systems and social problems that contribute to fetal, infant, and child deaths and to identify and implement systems improvement and interventions to improve the lives of some of our most vulnerable women, infants, children, and families. Keeping a Social Determinants of Health lens while conducting fatality review is a step toward reducing inequities in these vital health outcomes.

Special Instructions: Password: sdoh

Measuring Health Disparities. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Michigan Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This interactive course focuses on some basic issues for public health practice -- how to understand, define and measure health disparity. This course examines the language of health disparity to come to some common understanding of what that term means, explains key measures of health disparity and shows how to calculate them. This course was originally released in 2005. Given its success as a foundational course, updates were made in 2017 for this new, web-based version.

Learning Objectives: By the end of the first content section (which includes Part I What are Health Disparities? and Part II Issues in Measuring Health Disparities), you will be able to: • Identify the dimensions of health disparity as described in Healthy People 2020 • List three definitions of health disparity. • Interpret health disparity in graphical representations of data. • Explain relative and absolute disparity. • Describe how reference groups can affect disparity measurement. By the end of the second content section (which includes Part III Measures of Health Disparities and Part IV Analytic Steps in Measuring Health Disparity), you will be able to: • Describe at least three complex measures of health disparities. • List strengths and weaknesses of at least three health disparity measures. •Summarize the analytic steps in measuring health disparity.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: 3 CHES; 3.3 CNE Contact Hours

Managing Social Determinants of Health: A Framework for Identifying, Addressing Disparities in Medicaid Populations / A Conceptual and Analytical Framework for Identifying and Addressing the Social Determinants of Health in Medicaid Populations. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Health Management Associates and Disability Policy Consortium. Presenter(s): Ellen Breslin; Anissa Lambertino; Dennis Heaphy; Tony Dreyfus. Type: n.a.. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes. Slides

Annotation: Social determinants of health are increasingly recognized by Medicaid programs as important drivers of poor health outcomes and disparities that lead to higher costs. In response, Medicaid programs are beginning to analyze social determinants of health as potential causes of health disparities. During this webinar, Ellen Breslin and Anissa Lambertino of HMA, Dennis Heaphy of the Disability Policy Consortium, and independent consultant Tony Dreyfus presented an analytical framework for understanding the impact social determinants of health have on Medicaid populations. Leveraging work done by the Institute of Medicine, the framework includes measures and statistical methods that Medicaid programs, health plans, and accountable care organizations can use to generate the type of information needed to develop interventions that improve health outcomes.

Learning Objectives: • Understand why social determinants of health are key to addressing health disparities and achieving the goals of payment and delivery system reform. • Learn about the value of population-based approaches for examining the relationship between social determinants of health and health disparities. • Find out what it takes to implement the type of framework, measures and statistical methods needed to effectively examine the importance of social determinants of health on health outcomes.

A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Center for Interprofessional Practice and Education. Presenter(s): Barbara Brandt, Patricia A. Cuff, Sandra D. Lane, Julian Fisher, Bianca Frogner. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 61 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar discusses how each speaker has used and implemented specific aspects of the Framework including: • a description of Interprofessional courses built upon the social determinants of health concept, that utilizes innovative teaching methods and actively engages members of the community for educating students; • an illustration of how a medical education department is finding ways to integrate the framework into the curriculum for health professional training in rural and underserved areas of the Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana and Idaho region; • a description of WHO’s efforts to integrate SDH into health workforce education and training to prepare for integrated people-centered health services, how SDH / IPE are addressed, and how this links to the framework & conceptual model. The Framework was published by the Institute of Medicine in 2016.

The Occupational (Im)Possibilities in a Segregated Neighborhood: A Matter of Justice in LCHD. Year Developed: 2016. Source: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families & Communities, Maternal and Child Health Life Course Research Network (LCRN). Presenter(s): Jyothi Gupta, PhD, ORT/L, FAOTA. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar – the sixth in the LCRN’s series on Occupational Therapy and MCH: An Emerging Partnership to Improve Early Family Experiences and Life Course Health Development – features Jyothi Gupta, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA. Dr. Gupta is a Doctor of Physical Therapy and Professor of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy at St. Catherine University. Her research interests are identifying contextual barriers to full participation of marginalized groups and identifying strategies to maximize participation. This webinar focuses on her experience in applying the Life Course Health Development (LCHD) model to one of her community partner sites in rural Mississippi.

Learning Objectives: • Explore the conceptual synergy of life course health development (LCHD) model and the occupational perspective of health and well-being. • Describe the conceptual alignment of the occupational perspective to health development. • Discuss the occupational lives of children living in a racially segregated rural community and potential negative impact on health and well-being.

From Concepts to Practice: Health Equity, Health Inequities, Health Disparities, and Social Determinants of Health. Year Developed: 2016. Source: Region 2 Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Web Trainig Self Study. Level: Introductory. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This module is meant to give the participant a broad overview of health equity, health inequities, health disparities and social determinants of health. It reviews definitions of each as well as examples based on the standards of Healthy People 2020. It also provides suggestions for action for public health professionals. This module was developed in collaboration with the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene Center for Health Equity.

Learning Objectives: • Define key concepts, including health equity, health inequities, health disparities, and social determinants of health. • Explain the relationship between health equity, health inequities, health disparities, and social determinants of health. • Compare and contrast the concepts of health equity, health inequities, health disparities, and social determinants of health. •List appropriate strategies that public health professionals can use to address health disparities and social determinants of health in order to achieve health equity. •Appreciate the importance of using strategies to advance health equity.

Special Instructions: This course is best viewed on Chrome or Firefox browsers.

Addressing Disparities and Disproportionality in Systems Serving Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. Year Developed: 2015. Source: National Center for Cultural Competence. Presenter(s): Diana Autin, Tawara D. Goode, Andy Imparato, Thomas Uno. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Advanced. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: This forum explores contributing factors to disparities and disproportionality and what three organizations are doing at the policy and practice levels to mitigate them. It begins with a discussion on how, when compared to non-Hispanic Whites, members of other racial and ethnic groups continue to be adversely impacted by health and health care disparities. It continues by exploring the overrepresentation of students primarily African American and most recently Latino in special education and children and youth with disabilities (across racial and ethnic groups) who are disproportionately placed in this nation’s juvenile justice system.

Learning Objectives: • Define and differentiate between health and health care disparities. • Define disproportionality and overrepresentation. • Cite the impact of disparities and disproportionality on individuals with disabilities and their families. • List three approaches to combat or mitigate health/health care disparities and disproportionality in education and juvenile justice. • Reflect on the role of leadership in bringing about change.

Race, Language and Ethnicity Data Collection. Year Developed: 2014. Source: National Center for Family Professional Partnerships. Presenter(s): Julie Lucero, PhD, MPH. Type: Webcast. Level: Introductory. Length: 58 minutes. Slides

Annotation: Collection of Race/Ethnicity and Language (REL) data data is important to tracking progress of health disparities across populations. Health disparities impact individual and family well-being throughout the United States by compounding and intersecting with traumatic life conditions such as the chronic strain of poverty and marginalization. The presentation included a brief history of health disparities and race/ethnicity categories; a description of why REL data are collected; and how to ask the questions.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.