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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 10 found.

Building Health Equity in Systems of Care by Engaging Diverse Families and Youth in Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Ways. Year Developed: 2019. Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Presenter(s): Linda Callejas, Catalina Booth, Rocio A. Tucen, Taylor Blanco, Daniella Dominguez, and Myriam Monsalve Serna. Type: Video Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 50 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar focuses on practical strategies for engaging diverse families and youth in culturally and linguistically appropriate ways. Topics covered include opening doors through language assistance, outreach and relationship building, establishing trust and creating a welcoming environment that attracts culturally diverse people, and more. This webinar is part of the Cultural and Linguistic Competence Learning Community. Additional resources are listed on the youtube page.

Measuring Health Disparities. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Michigan Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This interactive course focuses on some basic issues for public health practice -- how to understand, define and measure health disparity. This course examines the language of health disparity to come to some common understanding of what that term means, explains key measures of health disparity and shows how to calculate them. This course was originally released in 2005. Given its success as a foundational course, updates were made in 2017 for this new, web-based version.

Learning Objectives: By the end of the first content section (which includes Part I What are Health Disparities? and Part II Issues in Measuring Health Disparities), you will be able to: • Identify the dimensions of health disparity as described in Healthy People 2020 • List three definitions of health disparity. • Interpret health disparity in graphical representations of data. • Explain relative and absolute disparity. • Describe how reference groups can affect disparity measurement. By the end of the second content section (which includes Part III Measures of Health Disparities and Part IV Analytic Steps in Measuring Health Disparity), you will be able to: • Describe at least three complex measures of health disparities. • List strengths and weaknesses of at least three health disparity measures. •Summarize the analytic steps in measuring health disparity.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: 3 CHES; 3.3 CNE Contact Hours

Communicating Effectively with Limited English Proficient Individuals. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Interagency Working Group on Limited English Proficiency. Presenter(s): Aba Obrebski, Kristie Boutte, Chad Bennett, Charmaine Gibson. Type: n.a.. Level: Introductory. Length: 50 minutes.

Annotation: This video training series, in production since 2013, is part of a training toolkit designed to educate federal personnel on interacting with limited English proficient individuals. It was developed in response to the Attorney General’s February 2011 memorandum to all federal agencies, calling upon them to ensure that limited English proficient individuals can access federal government programs and services under Executive Order 13166. The training series is intended to help establish consistent and legally sound practices across the government when engaging in communications with limited English proficient individuals.

Health Literacy for Public Health Professionals. Year Developed: 2014. Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Presenter(s): Cynthia Baur, PhD, Julie Gazmararian, PhD, MPH. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: The purpose of this public health literacy web-based training program is to educate public health professionals about public health literacy and their role in providing health information and services and promoting public health literacy. This web-based course uses a 508-compliant template, knowledge checks, evaluation, CE and other credits, include glossary and resources tabs, scenario-based interactions and video clips.

Learning Objectives: • Define and describe public health literacy. • List factors that influence public health literacy. • Identify who is affected by public health literacy. • Recognize the consequences of limited public health literacy. • Determine who are the stakeholders in public health literacy. • Recognize the role of public health literacy in meeting core public health services. • Apply lessons learned to improve public health literacy.

Continuing Education: CME, CNE, CEU, CECH, and ACPE offered

Health Literacy. Year Developed: 2014. Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Presenter(s): Rima Rudd. Type: Video Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Dr. Rima Rudd, health literacy expert, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, explains health literacy.

Implications of Health Literacy for Public Health - Andrew Pleasant Presentation. Year Developed: 2013. Source: Institute of Medicine. Presenter(s): Andrew Pleasant. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Intermediate. Length: 15 minutes.

Annotation: Andrew Pleasant's presentation of the commissioned paper Health Literacy Around the World: Part 2, Health Literacy Efforts Within the United States and a Global Overview at the November 21, 2013 Institute of Medicine Roundtable on Health Literacy workshop Implications of Health Literacy for Public Health in Irvine, California.

Infusing Cultural and Linguistic Competence into Health Promotion Training. Year Developed: 2004. Source: Georgetown University, National Center for Cultural Competence. Presenter(s): Suzanne Bronheim, PhD; Tawara Goode. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 90 minutes (this learning opportunity is broken down into multiple sections so the user can learn at their own speed).

Annotation: This learning series discusses integrating cultural and linguistic competence into a health program framework. Six chapters address the rationale and framework for cultural competence, and its application to training personnel as well as in health agencies. The last chapter talks with people who have experienced cultural competence issues as well as MCH professionals’ work in the field around the topic. These discussions are framed around the topic of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

Learning Objectives: • Learn the rationale for cultural competence in primary care. • Describe a framework for cultural and linguistic competence. • Learn how to infuse cultural and linguistic competence into health promotion training.

Special Instructions: Click on the link chapter link to view videos.

Health Literacy and Public Health: Introduction. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: New York City, Long Island, Lower Tri-County Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: Self-paced. Part 2

Annotation: This self-paced online course introduces the concept of health literacy, provides strategies for considering literacy when creating public health messages for the general public and provides strategies for considering literacy in direct public health services to the public. The second part of this online course introduces the concept of health literacy, provides strategies for considering literacy when creating public health messages for the general public, and provides strategies for considering literacy in direct public health services to the public.

Learning Objectives: • Define fundamental literacy. • Define health literacy. • Describe how health literacy relates to public health. • List the four domains of health literacy. • Give an example of each of the four domains of health literacy. • List some coping strategies people use to compensate for their low literacy skills. • List some groups that are more likely to be less literate. • List some reasons why people may have low literacy. • List the consequences of low health literacy for individuals. • Describe why people, regardless of literacy skills, may fail to understand health information. • Give examples of how low literacy affects the essential services of public health. • List seven barriers to good communication in public health. • Provide an example for each barrier. • List seven techniques to improve health communication. • Define plain language. • Describe three communication strategies you can apply in your daily work.

Continuing Education: 1.5 CHES; 1.5 CME; 1.5 CNE Contact Hours

Culture and Health Literacy: Case Studies in Culture and Health Literacy. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Webcast. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This online training discusses how inequalities in health information contribute to unequal treatment and health outcomes for some populations (health disparities) and what communities can do to close the gap and improve health literacy. Three local efforts to address the health literacy gap in Minnesota are discussed. These include: the ECHO Project (Emergency Preparedness with Cultural Communities), PhotoVoice, and the Urban Health Agenda Community Advisory Committee (UHACAC). These projects represent cutting-edge work related to health literacy targeting cultural groups.

Learning Objectives: • Identify innovative strategies that can improve health literacy among cultural groups. • Discuss successes and challenges in designing and implementing strategies to close the health information gap among cultural groups. • Describe what other communities are doing to close the health information gap among cultural groups. • List what steps can be taken to stimulate further discussion on this topic.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account.

Continuing Education: 0.1 CEU/CE

Culture and Health Literacy: Beyond Access. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Dr. Kasiomayajula Viswanath. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This online training discusses how inequalities in health information contribute to unequal treatment and health outcomes for some populations (health disparities) and what communities can do to close the gap and improve health literacy. Inequalities in the generation, manipulation, and distribution of health information and the capacity to act on health information among social and cultural groups in the United States is discussed in an audio presentation by Dr. Kasiomayajula Viswanath. He is an Associate Professor in the Department of Society, Human Development, and Health at the Harvard School of Public Health. His research focuses on how inequalities in communication are associated with health disparities.

Continuing Education: 0.5 CEU/CE

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.