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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 11 found.

Health Equity: Start Where You Are. Year Developed: 2019. Source: National Institute for Child Health Quality. Presenter(s): Stacy Scott, PhD, MPA; Elizabeth Cote, MD, MPA. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 65 minutes.

Annotation: All children deserve an equal chance to grow and thrive, but too often, obstacles to health, such as poverty, access to quality education and healthcare, discrimination, and personal bias get in the way. Addressing the persistent inequities in our health systems will take the concerted efforts of many individuals—public health professionals, nurses, clinicians, policy makers, community advocates, and families, among others. Because, while health disparities are rooted in the structures of our systems, change begins with each one of us. This is why NICHQ is launching a series of webinars to support individuals who are pursuing equity within the health system. If you have ever felt overwhelmed on where to begin with tackling such a complex subject, we invite you to register for our first webinar and join us in what will be an ongoing conversation. This webinar addresses individual implicit bias.

Learning Objectives: • An overview of health equity and implicit bias, and their impact on children's health. • A modeling exercise to explore how to recognize and address our own individual implicit bias. • Resources and guidance to help attendees continue this journey after the webinar.

Special Instructions: Must enter contact information before viewing webinar.

Unconscious Bias: Do I Have the Tools to Recognize It and Speak Up?. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Region IV Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): Leonie Gordon, MD. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: Unconscious bias refers to the biases we hold that are not in our conscious control. Research shows that these biases can adversely affect key decisions in the workplace. The session enables you to work towards reducing the effects of unconscious bias for yourself and within your organization. Using examples that you will be able to relate to, we help you to explore the link between implicit bias and the impact on the organization. The overall aim of the session is to provide participants with an understanding of the nature of Unconscious Bias and how it impacts on individual and group attitudes, behaviors and decision-making processes.

Learning Objectives: • Explain the source and function of unconscious bias. • Discuss how unconscious bias impacts on decision-making and relationships in the organization. • Develop strategies and techniques for reducing personal unconscious bias, as well as the unconscious bias that manifests in teams and across the organization. • Develop a strategy for individual action.

Resources for Developing an Understanding of Health Disparities. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Association of Clinicians for the Underserved. Presenter(s): Susan White, MD. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 53 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar reviews online tools that offer both general and community specific interactive learning activities to help primary care providers better understand the community and the challenges of their patients. A variety of tools including Spent, bias assessment, medication simulation, Dartmouth Health Atlas, Google Maps, and community food resources are presented.

Measuring Health Disparities. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Michigan Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This interactive course focuses on some basic issues for public health practice -- how to understand, define and measure health disparity. This course examines the language of health disparity to come to some common understanding of what that term means, explains key measures of health disparity and shows how to calculate them. This course was originally released in 2005. Given its success as a foundational course, updates were made in 2017 for this new, web-based version.

Learning Objectives: By the end of the first content section (which includes Part I What are Health Disparities? and Part II Issues in Measuring Health Disparities), you will be able to: • Identify the dimensions of health disparity as described in Healthy People 2020 • List three definitions of health disparity. • Interpret health disparity in graphical representations of data. • Explain relative and absolute disparity. • Describe how reference groups can affect disparity measurement. By the end of the second content section (which includes Part III Measures of Health Disparities and Part IV Analytic Steps in Measuring Health Disparity), you will be able to: • Describe at least three complex measures of health disparities. • List strengths and weaknesses of at least three health disparity measures. •Summarize the analytic steps in measuring health disparity.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: 3 CHES; 3.3 CNE Contact Hours

Introduction to Cultural Competency and Humility. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Wisconsin Center for Public Health Education and Training. Presenter(s): Jameela Ali, MPH. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Introductory. Length: n.a..

Annotation: The ever-increasing diversity of our communities in Wisconsin and across the nation warrants increased cultural awareness on the part of public health professionals. By understanding the importance of cultural awareness, cultural competence and cultural humility, public health professionals will be better equipped to eliminate the long-standing disparities in the health and mental health status of diverse racial, ethnic, and cultural groups. This module provides a basic foundation in the philosophy, values, and conceptual frameworks of cultural competence and cultural humility. 

Learning Objectives: • Increase awareness and appreciation for the cultural diversity of Wisconsin • Define and understand concepts of culture, cultural awareness, cultural humility, and cultural competence • Identify how to incorporate cultural humility into public health through practical application • Highlight capacities and skills necessary to work effectively across diverse cultures

Special Instructions: Requires Adobe Flash.

Exploring Implicit Bias in Interprofessional Education and Practice. Year Developed: 2015. Source: American Interprofessional Health Collaborative. Presenter(s): Dr. Margaret Stuber, Dr. Janice Sabin. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 60 minutes. Series landing page

Annotation: Implicit or unconscious assumptions and biases challenge collaborative work within interprofessional teams and affect health equity for the population. Although pattern recognition is used by all health care professionals in their work, the results of assumptions made on the basis of past experience can be a hazard to client’s health. Women can be undertreated for heart disease, wealthy people may not be tested for HIV, or people of certain cultures may be undertreated for pain. Similarly, assumptions about people in specific professional fields may shape the way we interact, limiting the efficacy of our teams. This webinar addressed the definition and science of implicit or unconscious bias, as well as its role in contributing to social determinants of health. It used case examples to illustrate how unconscious bias affects clinical care, and discussed the research in this field. It presented ways to mitigate the effects of unconscious bias in health care, including diverse input in clinical decision-making and team care. It discussed how these ideas and objectives can be incorporated effectively into interprofessional education.

Learning Objectives: • Review the science of implicit social cognition and define implicit associations. • Describe situations in which unconscious bias may affect clinical care. • Identify strategies to minimize the influence of unconscious bias on interactions with patients and other healthcare professionals.

Special Instructions: All individuals will be required to set up a learner profile through a guest account to register for AIHC educational activities. More information about this one-time process and how to register for AIHC webinars can be found at https://aihc-us.org/AIHCregistration.

Bridging Gaps: The Vital Role of Cultural Competence in Healthcare. Year Developed: 2014. Source: University at Albany School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Wilma Alvarado-Little, M.A., M.S.W. and James O’Barr, M.S.W.. Type: Video. Level: Advanced Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Health disparities have been identified among racial and ethnic minorities within the United States. These disparities have been linked to health beliefs and behaviors, access to care, and quality of health care services. Cultural competency is one area in healthcare training that addresses health disparities by creating awareness of sociocultural and racial bias among medical and public health professionals. Jeannette South-Paul and Robert Like have stated in, Cultural Competence for the Health Workforce, "Evidence of cultural (racial, ethnic, and religious, among other determinants) discordance between health care providers and the populations they serve suggests that every member of the health workforce must understand and implement culturally competent care as the foundation for improving the quality of services delivered". Bridging Gaps: The Vital Role of Cultural Competence in Healthcare presents fundamental concepts on cultural and linguistic competence for medical and public health professionals. This webcast demonstrates why cultural and linguistic competence is important and how it can facilitate dialogue, awareness, and learning to address diverse healthcare needs. This webcast is part of the training series “Advancing Cultural Competence in the Public Health and Health Care Workforce”. More information can be found at www.advancingcc.org.

Learning Objectives: • Recognize the benefits of culturally and linguistically appropriate health services. • Describe methods for providing culturally and linguistically appropriate health services. • Explain why providing culturally competent care is essential to improving overall individual and population-based health outcomes.

Considering Cultural Competence in the Context of Public Health. Year Developed: 2012. Source: Center for Puerto Rican Studies-Centro. Presenter(s): Diana Romero PhD, MA; Elena Hoeppner, MPH; Andrea Skowronek, RD, MPH. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Introductory. Length: 40 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar introduces a module/educational program in cultural competency specifically for public health professionals. Examples of disparities in health outcomes is addressed as well as tools to become culturally competent public health providers.

Cultural Competence and Global Leadership. Year Developed: 2011. Source: Maternal & Child Health Public Health Leadership Institute. Presenter(s): David Steffen, PhD, Virginia Suarez, PhD. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: 60 minutes. Direct link

Annotation: The topic of global leadership and cultural competence becomes more important as work increasingly becomes global. This 60-minute slide presentation discusses the definition, key concepts and continuum of cultural competence, as well as the rationale for it and research on cultural differences and global leadership behaviors. Dr. Steffen discusses the difference between cultural competency and diversity, defining the “four layers” of diversity. Demographic trends within the U.S. and their significance are briefly touched on, as well as recent critical findings on health disparities. Leadership across cultures, Hofstede’s benchmark research, which identified five major dimensions on which cultures differ (Individualism vs Collectivism, Masculinity vs Femininity, Uncertainty Avoidance, Longterm Orientation, and Power Distance), is discussed in detail. Research findings from the GLOBE study are reviewed, in the context of global leadership attributes. The session addresses communication styles from different cultures as well as intercultural conflict styles and strategies to effectively resolve conflict.

Learning Objectives: • Define cultural competency and global leadership. • Understand research on cultural differences and global leadership behaviors. • Describe several intercultural conflict styles and strategies.

Special Instructions: To access this learning opportunity, scroll down on the landing page to “Cultural Competence and Global Leadership” leadership module and click on “View Module Presentation.”

Infusing Cultural and Linguistic Competence into Health Promotion Training. Year Developed: 2004. Source: Georgetown University, National Center for Cultural Competence. Presenter(s): Suzanne Bronheim, PhD; Tawara Goode. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 90 minutes (this learning opportunity is broken down into multiple sections so the user can learn at their own speed).

Annotation: This learning series discusses integrating cultural and linguistic competence into a health program framework. Six chapters address the rationale and framework for cultural competence, and its application to training personnel as well as in health agencies. The last chapter talks with people who have experienced cultural competence issues as well as MCH professionals’ work in the field around the topic. These discussions are framed around the topic of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

Learning Objectives: • Learn the rationale for cultural competence in primary care. • Describe a framework for cultural and linguistic competence. • Learn how to infuse cultural and linguistic competence into health promotion training.

Special Instructions: Click on the link chapter link to view videos.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.