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Negotiation and Conflict Resolution Training Brief. Year Developed: unknown. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This training brief contains targeted learning opportunities to assist the MCH workforce understand how to negotiate and resolve conflict that may arise in the work place.

Unconscious Bias: Do I Have the Tools to Recognize It and Speak Up?. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Region IV Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): Leonie Gordon, MD. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: Unconscious bias refers to the biases we hold that are not in our conscious control. Research shows that these biases can adversely affect key decisions in the workplace. The session enables you to work towards reducing the effects of unconscious bias for yourself and within your organization. Using examples that you will be able to relate to, we help you to explore the link between implicit bias and the impact on the organization. The overall aim of the session is to provide participants with an understanding of the nature of Unconscious Bias and how it impacts on individual and group attitudes, behaviors and decision-making processes.

Learning Objectives: • Explain the source and function of unconscious bias. • Discuss how unconscious bias impacts on decision-making and relationships in the organization. • Develop strategies and techniques for reducing personal unconscious bias, as well as the unconscious bias that manifests in teams and across the organization. • Develop a strategy for individual action.

Collaborating Across Cultures. Year Developed: 2017. Source: ASA Community of Applied Statisticians. Presenter(s): Charisse Kosova, M.Ad.Ed.. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: 62 minutes.

Annotation: Collaborating across cultures can add an interesting global perspective to the work we do, but intercultural communication also comes with unique challenges. This session explored some of the research-based dimensions of culture that lead to differences in work style preferences and communication styles across cultures. By analyzing mini case studies in which culture interfered with collaboration, this session also offered simple tips and recommended adaptations that can lead to more rewarding and productive collaboration across cultures. A video and presentation slides are available.

Resolving Differences Using the "Circle of Conflict". Year Developed: 2016. Source: Annie E. Casey Foundation. Presenter(s): Jolie Bain Pillsbury. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 8 minutes.

Annotation: Recognizing and sorting out the types of conflicts that inevitably arise among social and public leaders will go a long way toward helping reach desired results for children and their families. The video, part of the Foundation’s series of video tools for results-based leadership development, lays out common conflicts on a circle graph: data conflicts, relationship conflicts, language conflicts, values conflicts, interest conflicts, and structural conflicts. Being able to identify and discuss the types of conflict that are occurring will allow partners to better determine how to resolve them so productive work can continue to happen.

Learning Objectives:

Your Brain on Conflict: Manage Your Stress, Improve Your Productivity, and Effectively Lead. Year Developed: 2015. Source: GovLoop. Presenter(s): Ken Buch. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Introductory. Length: 50 minutes.

Annotation: Why is it so much harder to make a decision in the afternoon? Why did you suddenly remember the name of your client you’ve been trying to recall all day? Why did you completely erupt at your spouse when he asked you what you want to eat for dinner? Ken Buch, an Adjunct Faculty and Executive Coach at the University of Maryland Office of Executive Programs, explains the physical effects of your brain experiencing conflict. The course comprises an overview, 15 lessons, and a post-course survey.

Learning Objectives: • Why meaning-making, complex decision-making, and strategic thinking are so difficult late in the day. • How you convert experiences into long term memory. • Why social pain is actually more detrimental than physical pain. • What causes someone to “snap” and lose control. • What conditions you need in order to facilitate change. • How to employ specific strategies to minimize your limbic arousal.

Continuing Education: GovLoop is registered with the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA) as a sponsor of continuing professional education on the National Registry of CPE Sponsors.

Leading for Engagement: Getting Employees to Love What They Do. Year Developed: 2015. Source: GovLoop. Presenter(s): Brian Crewe. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Introductory. Length: 8 minutes.

Annotation: Engagement is definitely a big buzzword these days. How do we get people to do more in an environment where resources are dwindling? More importantly, how do you get beyond the buzzword to reflect on how your role shapes engagement at your agency, regardless of your title? Taught by Brian Crewe, who brings a perspective from more than 10 years in federal and local government, you will come to find that better engagement begins not at the highest levels of the organization, but within yourself. The course comprises an overview, one lesson, and a post-course survey.

Learning Objectives: • Understand what it means to manage yourself and how your behavior affects others • Realize that the Platinum Rule is more important than the Golden Rule when it comes to managing others • Think about whether or not you really want to be a leader…or an exceptional follower!

Continuing Education: GovLoop is registered with the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA) as a sponsor of continuing professional education on the National Registry of CPE Sponsors.

Leadership Conversations: Communicate to Become a More Effective Leader. Year Developed: 2015. Source: GovLoop. Presenter(s): Alan S. Berson. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Introductory. Length: 30 minutes.

Annotation: Great leaders understand the importance of regular and meaningful conversations between themselves and their teams. However, those conversations are not all the same. Your leadership style, the personalities of your team, and the needs of your organization will dictate how to make the most of these necessary conversations. This course is led by Alan S. Berson, an executive coach, leadership consultant and professor with years of experience leading Fortune 500 companies. He’s also the co-author of “Leadership Conversations”, on which this course is based. The course comprises an overview, one lesson, and a post-course survey.

Learning Objectives: • How conversations can help you connect with your team and become a more effective leader. • How to embed continuous learning to build a culture of success. • How to inspire people in difficult times with proven step-by-step processes.

Continuing Education: GovLoop is registered with the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA) as a sponsor of continuing professional education on the National Registry of CPE Sponsors.

5 Quick Tips to Have a Nice Conflict: How to Manage Emotions in the Office. Year Developed: 2015. Source: GovLoop. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Introductory. Length: 7 minutes.

Annotation: President Reagan once said, “Peace is not the absence of conflict; it is the ability to handle conflict by peaceful means.” And that’s not just true on the geopolitical level, but in every office place in America. The truth is that conflict is inevitable, but there are some steps you can take to prevent and manage it. The course is based on the book, “Have a Nice Conflict: How to Find Success and Satisfaction in the Most Unlikely Places” by Tim Scudder, CPA, Michael Patterson, Ed.D., and Kent Mitchell. The course comprises an overview, 1 lesson, and a post-course survey.

Learning Objectives: • Learn five ways that you can mitigate and manage conflict in your office. • Understand how you and others approach conflict when it arises. • Commit to an action that you can take to address conflict in your context.

Continuing Education: GovLoop is registered with the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA) as a sponsor of continuing professional education on the National Registry of CPE Sponsors.

Leading in Changing Times Webinar Series. Year Developed: 2014. Source: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Presenter(s): Karen Trierweiler, Valerie Ricker, and Stephanie Wrightsman-Birch. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: Series, various lengths (approximately 45 minutes each). AMCHP landing page with additional webinars and resources

Annotation: In working to improve the lives of women, children and families, leadership is an essential role for maternal and child health (MCH) programs. Leaders must have a vision, take initiative, influence people, solve problems, and take responsibility in order to make things happen. And, whether or not they have a formal title, everyone is engaged in the process of leadership. Likewise, everyone can develop their leadership effectiveness. AMCHP’s efforts to strengthen the capacity of the MCH community to engage in the leadership process recognize that leadership development is a process, not an event. The Leading in Changing Times Series is an initiative launched by AMCHP as part of their larger efforts to support a diverse, effective and competent workforce in state and territorial MCH programs. The Leading in Changing Times Series is a year-long, three-part series of webinars blending principles of key leadership theory with real-world stories from senior-level MCH leaders. These 45 minutes leadership “conversations” are designed to share leadership ideas and inspiration through a 20 minute presentation and 25 minute discussion. The three webinars consist of: (1) Great Leaders are Great Decision-Makers: The Importance of Decisiveness; (2) Leading Change: The Challenge of Change; and (3) Leaders with a Vision: The Ability to See Beyond the Present.

Learning Objectives: 1. Great Leaders are Great Decision-Makers: The Importance of Decisiveness • Explore the elements of decision making in public health leadership theory. • Understand the benefits of having a defined approach to prioritizing among many concerns and issues. • Learn concrete strategies and examples that they can use to prioritize maternal and child health efforts in their state. 2. Leading Change: The Challenge of Change • Learn six characteristics of effective change. • Understand the difference between managing and leading change. • Identify opportunities to support or lead change within their organization. • Identify opportunities to practice strategies shared in the webinar. 3. Leaders with a Vision: The Ability to See Beyond the Present • Describe three skills of strategic leadership. • Identify opportunities to create a shared vision within their organization. • Identify opportunities to practice strategies shared in the webinar.

Consensus Building Approach. Year Developed: 2014. Source: Harvard Law School Program on Negotiation. Presenter(s): Lawrence Susskind. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 8 minutes.

Annotation: Effective consensus building in multi-party, environmental disputes is a valuable skill and can make or break a negotiation. The Program On Negotiation’s Vice-Chair of Education, Larry Susskind, offers key insights into the consensus building approach in this video from The Program On Negotiation.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.