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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 13 found.

Shaping the future of public health: A conversation with emerging leaders. Year Developed: 2022. Source: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Bryan O. Buckley, DrPH; Tiffani Bell, MD, MPH; Sarah Tsay; Teguo Djoyum. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: A psychiatrist who focuses on erasing the stigma of mental health care in the Black community. A hospital executive who tackles emergency preparedness through an equity lens. A nonprofit founder who travels the world to bring neurodiagnostic training to the Global South. These are among the new leaders defining the future of public health. COVID-19 thrust the field into the spotlight, sending applications to schools of public health soaring. The future leaders emerging from the pandemic share a powerful conviction that they can forge a more equitable future, with health, dignity, and justice for all. In this webinar, the panel explores the challenges and joys of pursuing that work with several Harvard Chan students and recent alumni.

Learning Objectives: • Explore how COVID-19 is affecting the future of public health • Discuss how health equity and justice will impact the future of public health • Learn from a variety of public health professionals about the challenges and strengths of pursuing a career in public health

Engaging Young People & Promoting Mental Health Education on Social Media. Year Developed: 2020. Source: The Institute for Innovation & Implementation. Presenter(s): Chantel Garrett; Syrena Clark. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 86 minutes.

Annotation: In this webinar recording, presenters discuss youth-friendly social media platforms as tools to grow awareness about mental health, best practices to engage youth online, how social media platforms can be leveraged to help youth connect with the support that they need, as well as examples from across the country.

Learning Objectives: • Become familiar with youth-friendly social media platforms as tools to grow awareness about mental health, early psychosis and clinical high risk. • Discuss best practices and principles to engage youth online through relevant messaging and social media engagement strategies. • Discuss how social media platforms can be leveraged to help youth connect with the support that they need at all phases of care. • Discuss examples and learnings from across the country.

Operationalizing SOC Communication: Telling Stories That Work. Year Developed: 2019. Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Presenter(s): Jennifer Nichols, PhD. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 82 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar launches a Four-Part System of Care (SOC) Communication Series, Reframing Child and Adolescent Wellbeing, provided by the FrameWorks Institute on evidence-based communication strategies proven to make messages—about child and adolescent mental and behavioral health, adolescent substance use, juvenile justice, child welfare, and related issues—more effective. This session highlights how social science research can tell us which messaging choices lead to which responses. Participants learn about strategic framing: what it is, how it works, and why it matters; and will gain new tools that can be used right away. This webinar is part of the SOC Expansion Leadership LC.

Changing the Public Conversation on Health: How to Use Framing to "Decode" Social Determinants and Health Equity. Year Developed: 2018. Source: CityMatCH. Presenter(s): Andy Wessel, MPH. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 80 minutes.

Annotation: Despite the foundational role that health plays in everyone's quality of life, the field of public health is not well understood by the general public and decision-makers. This webinar describes how the Douglas County Health Department in Omaha is applying research from FrameWorks Institute and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to build stronger support for prevention and equity approaches.

Learning Objectives: • Why our messages frequently fail to translate the importance of public health to people outside the field. • How to use well-researched values and explanatory metaphors to "decode" our work on social determinants and health equity. • Why "naked numbers" are problematic and how "social math" can help our audience better understand the significance of data • How these framing practices can be applied to MCH advocacy.

2018 DMCHWD Grantee Virtual Meeting: How to Tell Your Program's Story. Year Developed: 2018. Source: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Maternal and Child Health Workforce Development. Presenter(s): Deborah Klein Walker, EdD. Type: PowerPoint Presentation. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-paced, multiple items..

Annotation: The meeting addressed how to compose and share your program's story from a high-level perspective, emphasizing effectiveness, impact, and interaction with key audiences. It also underscored the value of building and establishing relationships with decision-makers, state agencies, community organizations, and more. To highlight Dr. Klein Walker's presentation, three (3) DMCHWD grantees shared their examples during the webinar. You can view the YouTube recording of the presentation. Their slides and attachments are located on the webpage at the link in this record. The three programs were: * Leadership Education in Adolescent Health (LEAH): MCH H.O.P.E.S. (Birmingham, AL) * Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities (LEND): Cincinnati Children's Hospital (Cincinnati, OH) * Healthy Tomorrows: Clinic in the Park (Santa Ana, CA) This resource includes the meeting agenda, PowerPoint slides, transcripts, discussion notes, and other materials.

Crafting Richer Public Health Messages using Moral Foundations Theory. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Network for Public Health Law. Presenter(s): Gene Matthews; Scott Burris. Type: Webinar. Level: Advanced. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: Effective messaging of public health challenges and interventions is essential to public health practice and especially to implementing public health laws and policies in a polarized political environment. It is easy for public health leaders to become consumed with the ongoing political and resource shifts taking place in public health and health care. However, it is also clear that those in public health, at all levels, want to engage more deeply and meaningfully with communities of all backgrounds who are burdened by poor health. Using Moral Foundations Theory, the speakers explain how liberals and conservative audiences resonate differently to six intuitive foundational moral values. This session explores crafting messages that embrace all six foundational values so that public health practitioners may engage a broader base of support and develop new community partnerships.

Special Instructions: Slides and videos for all three parts of this series are available on the series link.

Continuing Education: Individuals may qualify for CLE credit. ASLME is an approved provider of continuing legal education credits in several states ASLME will also apply for CLE credits in other states upon request.

Public Speaking: Ten Tips from GovLoop's Founder. Year Developed: 2015. Source: GovLoop. Presenter(s): Steve Ressler. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 30 minutes.

Annotation: Public speaking is an art and it does take practice. While you can’t wake up and assume you’re going to be an excellent public speaker, you can hone the skills to get closer to mastery. After all, being an effective presenter is a critical competency for everyone in an organization, not just leaders! The course comprises an overview, 6 lessons, 2 interactive segments, and a post-course survey.

Learning Objectives: • Train yourself to speak slowly and keep your remarks succinct. • Incorporate interaction and stories into your speaking opportunities. • Pay attention to the design of your slides and know your content cold.

Communicating Public Health: Message Design Strategies to Promote Awareness and Action to Address Social Determinants of Health. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Region 2 Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): Jeff Niederdeppe. Type: Video. Level: Intermediate. Length: 58 minutes.

Annotation: In an event co-sponsored by the Lerner Center for Public Health Promotion, guest lecturer Dr. Jeff Niederdeppe from Cornell University presents an overview of how public health communication can assist in addressing social determinants of health and health disparities. He begins the lecture by focusing on what should be communicated in public health messaging and to whom, what situations you are trying to change with your health communications, and knowing what barriers you face in communicating your message.

Learning Objectives: • An understanding that education and awareness may not be enough. • The importance of connecting messages to broader values. • The understanding that opposing messengers are a challenge.

Health Literacy for Public Health Professionals. Year Developed: 2014. Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Presenter(s): Cynthia Baur, PhD, Julie Gazmararian, PhD, MPH. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: The purpose of this public health literacy web-based training program is to educate public health professionals about public health literacy and their role in providing health information and services and promoting public health literacy. This web-based course uses a 508-compliant template, knowledge checks, evaluation, CE and other credits, include glossary and resources tabs, scenario-based interactions and video clips.

Learning Objectives: • Define and describe public health literacy. • List factors that influence public health literacy. • Identify who is affected by public health literacy. • Recognize the consequences of limited public health literacy. • Determine who are the stakeholders in public health literacy. • Recognize the role of public health literacy in meeting core public health services. • Apply lessons learned to improve public health literacy.

Special Instructions: Registration is required. To access this content, you first need to create an account or if you already have an account at Train.org, use the login.

Continuing Education: CME, CNE, CEU, CECH, and ACPE offered

Using Good Communication Skills in Public Health Education and Promotion to Overcome Community Language Barriers. Year Developed: 2013. Source: n.a.. Presenter(s): Giovanna Lipow, Marie Cobalt, Yajing Zhang, and Zachary Mckellar. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Introductory. Length: 7 minutes.

Annotation: This presentation outlines the importance of good communication skills as a tool for public health educators and barriers related to communication and accessible language. Communication tips are presented to present information in a culturally sensitive manner. Overall recommendations from the presentation include honing oral and written communication skills, developing materials in more than one language, updating your technical communication skills, and incorporating communication as a professional development goal.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $225,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.