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Displaying records 11 through 20 of 21 found.

Negotiating Skills for Changing Times. Year Developed: 2012?. Source: South Central Public Health Partnership. Presenter(s): Ellen Belzer, MPA. Type: n.a.. Level: Intermediate. Length: 117 minutes.

Annotation: In today’s quickly changing, dynamic, and sometimes volatile health care environment, negotiation skills are more important than ever before. In this course, participants learn how to negotiate better agreements and resolve conflicts more effectively, while developing better inter-professional relationships in the process. Other specific topics include: selecting the best negotiation style, how to use time techniques effectively, ways to uncover the other party’s hidden agenda, how to neutralize emotionalism, the secret to protecting oneself against poor agreements, how framing and anchoring strategies can help get better outcomes, and when and how to make creative solutions, compromises and concessions. A proven six-step negotiation process is central to this course.

Learning Objectives: • Identify the differences between hard, soft, and principled negotiation styles. • Apply strategies to neutralize emotionalism in themselves as well as the other party. • Define and apply the BATNA concept as a protection against poor agreements. • Apply framing strategies in ways that contribute to distributive or integrative outcomes. • Identify the three components of establishing a bargaining range. • Use the six-step negotiation process to reach better agreements and resolve conflicts more effectively, while improving inter-professional relationships. • Identify several mistakes that people commonly make when negotiating at an uneven table. • Know how to utilize power effectively during a negotiation when holding greater or lesser power than the other party. • Identify ways to use power strategies to create a more symmetrical power relationship at the negotiating table and thus achieve better outcomes.

Social Media for Public Health Practice: Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn. Year Developed: 2010. Source: Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Presenter(s): Patrick O’Carroll, MD, MPH, FACPM; Bud Nicola. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Practical application of social media in public health is the theme of this presentation. Dr. O’Carroll begins by advocating for the possibilities Twitter and Facebook can have in the public health field. He describes the role, basics and uses of Twitter by showing step-by-step how to join and use the online application. He also creates a table that illustrates when to use each social media tool based on their characteristics. The learner is also provided a guided tour of how to use and join Facebook. Mr. Nicola next describes LinkedIn, a social networking site for professionals and demonstrates how to use the site. Slides of both presentations are available for use. FYI: A short technical interruption occurs at the beginning of the webinar.

Learning Objectives: • Compare how different methods of communication fit different purposes and different audiences. • Describe how to employ a set of “new media” technologies (e.g., Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn) in various aspects of public health practice. • Describe the benefits and limitations of various “new media” technologies as tools for use in a public health setting.

Special Instructions: Registration to PH LearnLink is required. To access the video, click on the “Play the recorded presentation” link under “Session Archive.”

Ready, Willing and Able Online Training. Year Developed: 2010. Source: University of Kansas Research and Training Center on Independent Living and the Kansas Dept. of Health & Environment. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Advanced. Length: 120 minutes.

Annotation: This course is designed for the public health, hospital, preparedness, emergency response and disaster relief workforce. Specific training covers disability etiquette, terminology, and communications and assistance techniques during disasters for assisting people with disabilities. The course covers various disaster assistance needs of persons with sight, mobility, hearing and cognitive disabilities. Instruction is given in the video by professional educators with one educator being a person with a disability to enhance the experience of acquainting the audience with disabilities.

Learning Objectives: • Describe different needs populations. • Use correct terminology. • Describe methods to approach persons with disabilities. • Gain skills to better perform your duties. • Describe the characteristics and needs of individuals with disabilities. • Acquire knowledge of best practices. • Provide the best possible outcome for the client/consumer, the responder, and the receiver in the event of a natural or bioterrorist disaster. • Describe the public health role in emergency response in a range of emergencies that might arise. • Describe individual functional role(s) in emergency response and demonstrate the role(s) in regular drills. • Describe communication role(s) in emergency response within the agency, using established communication systems for the agency, general public, personnel, and media. • Identify limits to own knowledge, skills, and authority, and identify key systems for referring matters that exceed these limits. • Apply creative problem solving and flexible thinking to unusual challenges within an individuals functional responsibility and evaluate effectiveness of all actions taken.

Special Instructions: After completing the course and evaluation a certificate of completion will be available through the 'Certificate' link on the right handside of the homepage. 1. This online course will take 2 hrs to complete and includes a pre/post assessment, video, an evaluation and course certificate. 2. Use Internet Explorer or Google Chrome as your browser and high speed Internet service 3. Turn OFF your pop-up blockers 4.Test the compatiblity of your computer for taking this online course: » Click the help button located on the TRAIN Navigation taskbar » Left-hand menu select 'Test Your Environment', Run Test button » All of the checkmarks should be GREEN » If any of the links are RED, click the link and follow the prompts

Demystifying Social Media for Public Health Practice: Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn. Year Developed: 2010. Source: Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Presenter(s): Patrick O’Carroll, MD, MPH, FACPM; Bud Nicola. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Practical application of social media in public health is the theme of this presentation. Dr. O’Carroll begins by advocating for the possibilities Twitter and Facebook can have in the public health field. He describes the role, basics and uses of Twitter by showing step-by-step how to join and use the online application. He also creates a table that illustrates when to use each social media tool based on their characteristics. The learner is also provided a guided tour of how to use and join Facebook. Mr. Nicola next describes LinkedIn, a social networking site for professionals and demonstrates how to use the site. Slides of both presentations are available for use. FYI: A short technical interruption occurs at the beginning of the webinar.

Learning Objectives: • Compare how different methods of communication fit different purposes and different audiences. • Describe how to employ a set of “new media” technologies (e.g., Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn) in various aspects of public health practice. • Describe the benefits and limitations of various “new media” technologies as tools for use in a public health setting.

Special Instructions: Registration to PH LearnLink is required. To access the video, click on the “Play the recorded presentation” link under “Session Archive.”

Social Media and Public Health. Year Developed: 2009. Source: TRAIN Connecticut. Presenter(s): Lynn Townshend; R. Craig Lefebvre, PhD. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: These conference presentations begin with Ms. Townshend who discusses “Making Social Media Part of Comprehensive Communication Strategy”. She covers how to create a timely communication strategy using new and social media and describes the benefits and shortcoming of utilizing social media. Next Dr. Lefebvre focuses on “New Media Applications and Their Role in Public Health Outreach” by explaining sources, channels and receivers of messages, as well as concepts, behaviors, tools, and landscapes that frame social media. A peanut butter recall campaign example is used to show how using media can be utilized to change health behaviors. His presentation concludes by focusing on the implications of social media in public health programs. Real experiences of a health department and organization utilizing social media, and a question and answer panel, conclude the presentation. FYI: There are some technical issues in the real-life examples and panel discussion sections.

Learning Objectives: • Identify the tools of social media and the audiences they reach. • Describe how to incorporate social media into a health communication strategy. • Identify the benefits and challenges of using social media.

Special Instructions: Registration to TRAIN is required. To access the course, click on the “Registration” tab and then click on “Launch.”

Continuing Education: International Association for Continuing Education and Training (IACET) Continuing Education Units (CEUs) are offered. Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) CEUs are also offered.

Social Marketing and Public Health: Effective Campaigns and How They Work. Year Developed: 2009. Source: MidAtlantic Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): W. Douglas Evans, PhD, MA; Terry Long. Type: Video Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This video provides an overview of social marketing and recent effective public health campaigns. The first presenter, Dr. Evans, discusses social marketing in a broad sense and how it differs from health communications and social media as well as the evidence for effectiveness. The four main theoretical foundations are discussed, followed by various social marketing strategies/tactics commonly used. Dr. Evans discusses major social marketing campaigns recently targeted to adolescents, such as the truth campaign, an anti-tobacco campaign. Additional campaign and initiative examples presented include VERB, mHealth, and text4baby. The second presenter, Terry Long, focuses on the Heart Truth, a successful social marketing campaign initiated by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI, presenting its inception, how it was developed, the implementation strategy, and why it works. She begins with an overview about heart disease and women and the impact of awareness, followed by highlights of the campaign such as the branding power, corporate partnerships, and community action. Finally, the impact of the campaign is discussed. A question and answer session follows the two presentations.

Learning Objectives: • Understand what is social marketing. • Learn social marketing theories and strategies. • Describe principals and evidence of effectiveness.

Special Instructions: To access the presentation, scroll down the page to the embedded video screen and click the “play” button.

Health Policy Communications. Year Developed: 2007. Source: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation . Presenter(s): Jackie Judd. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 15 minutes. List of all archived webinars as of 09/13, when website was closed.

Annotation: This presentation is an overview of the media and how to present information to policy-makers and journalists. Ms. Judd describes the importance of tailoring messages to different audiences and interviewers, as well as establishing rules with a reporter. The presentation also covers the basics of messaging and how to navigate different types of interviews (i.e. print/online, television, and/or radio). The components necessary for briefing decision-makers is also included.

Special Instructions: kaiserEDU.org website was closed in September 2013. Tutorials are no longer updated but due to demand by professors who are still using the tutorials in class assignments, the Kaiser Family Foundation has made them available for download on archive site.

Telling Your Program's Story: Learning Brief. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): MCH Navigator. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: The purpose of this learning brief is to provide resources that support storytelling in public health. In turn, this will aide health professionals’ understanding of: • What a success story is. • Why it is important to tell success stories. • What tools and strategies are available to develop success stories. The five elements of this framework are based on the plenary session for the Division of MCH Workforce Development Grantee Virtual Meeting (09/26/18), “How to Tell Your Program’s Story to Key Stakeholders,” given by Deborah Klein Walker, Ed.D.

Learning Objectives: • Understanding what a success story is. • Learning why it is important to tell success stories. • Equipping yourself with the tools and strategies are available to develop success stories.

Motivational Interviewing: Supporting Patients in Health Behavior Change. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: Upper Midwest Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): Rebecca Lang EdD, RDH, CHES. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This course is designed to equip healthcare providers and ancillary staff with the knowledge and tools to optimize patient behavior change to ultimately improve health outcomes. The following are the topics that will be covered in this course: • Components of Motivational Interviewing (MI) • Benefits of Using Motivational Interviewing • Traditional Expert-Centered Model vs. MI Patient-Centered Model • Principles of Motivational Interviewing • Readiness to Elicit Change Talk

Learning Objectives: • Implement effective patient communication strategies based on individualized readiness to make a behavior change. • Increase healthcare providers’ knowledge on the importance and utilization of the patient-centered model of behavior change. • Implement motivational interviewing techniques during patient visits for improved health outcomes.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: 0.12 CEU/CE; 1 Dietitians CPE

In the Know: Social Media for Public Health Webcast Series. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: National Prevention Information Network. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: Series; various lengths.

Annotation: The "In the Know" webinar archives provide experts in public health, communications, and technology to share their knowledge about how social media can support public health campaigns. Sessions for Series 1 include: Twitter; LinkedIn and Slideshare; Gaming and Mobile; Facebook and Image Sharing (Instagram, Pinterest and Flickr); Google+ and YouTube; and Measurement and Evaluation. Sessions for Series 2 include: The Life Cycle of a Social Media Plan; What’s New in Image & Video Sharing?; What’s New in Social Media?

Special Instructions: Each webcast is archived on SlideShare and in a webinar recording available from NPIN's gateway page.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $225,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.