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Displaying records 11 through 20 of 23 found.

Fundamentals of Writing a Responsive Grant Application. Year Developed: 2015. Source: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 78 minutes.

Annotation: Topics include grant application basics; writing a narrative that matches review criteria; how application pieces fit together to respond to the funding opportunity announcement; and a question and answer session with grant management experts. Links to additional downloadable materials are included.

Communicating Public Health: Message Design Strategies to Promote Awareness and Action to Address Social Determinants of Health. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Region 2 Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): Jeff Niederdeppe. Type: Video. Level: Intermediate. Length: 58 minutes.

Annotation: In an event co-sponsored by the Lerner Center for Public Health Promotion, guest lecturer Dr. Jeff Niederdeppe from Cornell University presents an overview of how public health communication can assist in addressing social determinants of health and health disparities. He begins the lecture by focusing on what should be communicated in public health messaging and to whom, what situations you are trying to change with your health communications, and knowing what barriers you face in communicating your message.

Learning Objectives: • An understanding that education and awareness may not be enough. • The importance of connecting messages to broader values. • The understanding that opposing messengers are a challenge.

Communicating Effectively with Limited English Proficient Individuals. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Interagency Working Group on Limited English Proficiency. Presenter(s): Aba Obrebski, Kristie Boutte, Chad Bennett, Charmaine Gibson. Type: n.a.. Level: Introductory. Length: 50 minutes.

Annotation: This video training series, in production since 2013, is part of a training toolkit designed to educate federal personnel on interacting with limited English proficient individuals. It was developed in response to the Attorney General’s February 2011 memorandum to all federal agencies, calling upon them to ensure that limited English proficient individuals can access federal government programs and services under Executive Order 13166. The training series is intended to help establish consistent and legally sound practices across the government when engaging in communications with limited English proficient individuals.

Using Good Communication Skills in Public Health Education and Promotion to Overcome Community Language Barriers. Year Developed: 2013. Source: n.a.. Presenter(s): Giovanna Lipow, Marie Cobalt, Yajing Zhang, and Zachary Mckellar. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Introductory. Length: 7 minutes.

Annotation: This presentation outlines the importance of good communication skills as a tool for public health educators and barriers related to communication and accessible language. Communication tips are presented to present information in a culturally sensitive manner. Overall recommendations from the presentation include honing oral and written communication skills, developing materials in more than one language, updating your technical communication skills, and incorporating communication as a professional development goal.

Strategies for Successful Public Health Messaging. Year Developed: 2013. Source: Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Presenter(s): Tim Church; James Apa. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar delves into ideas of effective communication, credibility, and the use of social media in creating effective public health campaigns. It explores how audiences receive messages and are motivated for action. Tim Church and James Apa each speak about the high-tech and low-tech strategies that public health organizations should use in sharing public messages to the public across the different phases of a public health event. They also speak about the importance of social media, websites, and partnerships (local, community, medical, media) to target and disseminate public health messages.

Learning Objectives: • Recognize what determines credibility in high and low concern settings. • Identify effective ways to inform the public about developing public health issues. • Describe the importance of working with other partners in disseminating public health information and messages. • Identify how public health messaging needs to change during different phases of a public health event.

Special Instructions: Need to register/log in to access.

Communicating Science: Translating Research for Policy and Practice. Year Developed: 2013. Source: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women’s and Children’s Health Policy Center. Presenter(s): Marjory Ruderman, MHS. Type: Video. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 19 minutes.

Annotation: This presentation provides a broad overview of the rationales for and barriers to taking action to ensure that public health science is communicated beyond academic journals and applied to efforts to improve health for individuals and populations. Cameo video commentary from public information staff of the Institute of Medicine is used to share strategies for being competitive in the marketplace of ideas that interventions and policies are derived from. Downloadable slides and a transcript of the presentation are provided at <http://www.jhsph.edu/research/centers-and-institutes/womens-and-childrens-health-policy-center/writing-skills/Transcript-Translational-Writing.pdf>.

Learning Objectives: • Learn the importance of translating research. • Understand the characteristics of both academic researchers and policymakers. • Learn best practices for health professionals to communicate science for use in policy and practice.

Preparing a Successful Research Grant Application. Year Developed: 2011. Source: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Office of Epidemiology and Research. Presenter(s): Cynthia Minkovitz, PhD, Daniel Armstrong, PhD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: The webinar first starts with necessary considerations when completing a grant application, such as knowing your audience, choosing the correct question, and understanding differences in evaluation criteria (e.g. HRSA versus NIH). It also addresses key components of grants and the importance of having mentors review your grant before submission. Next, it presents the “Pearls and Pitfalls of Grant Preparation” and touches on advance planning, figures and tables, and using measures that match hypotheses. The learning opportunity stresess the importance of consistency in the grant writing process. A 15 minute question and answer session completes the webinar.

Learning Objectives: • Learn how to prepare a successful research application for competitive funding agencies. • Describe the key elements of a strong research proposal. • Learn tips for making your grant application ready for submission.

Special Instructions: To access presentation, scroll down to “6/6/11: Preparing a Successful Research Grant Application” and click on the blue title.

Health Policy Communications. Year Developed: 2007. Source: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation . Presenter(s): Jackie Judd. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 15 minutes. List of all archived webinars as of 09/13, when website was closed.

Annotation: This presentation is an overview of the media and how to present information to policy-makers and journalists. Ms. Judd describes the importance of tailoring messages to different audiences and interviewers, as well as establishing rules with a reporter. The presentation also covers the basics of messaging and how to navigate different types of interviews (i.e. print/online, television, and/or radio). The components necessary for briefing decision-makers is also included.

Special Instructions: kaiserEDU.org website was closed in September 2013. Tutorials are no longer updated but due to demand by professors who are still using the tutorials in class assignments, the Kaiser Family Foundation has made them available for download on archive site.

Improving Your Communication Skills. Year Developed: 2004. Source: South Central Public Health Partnership. Presenter(s): Dr. Timothy Keogh. Type: Video Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 120 minutes.

Annotation: In this two hour module, Dr. Timothy Keogh introduces different types of communication styles and components and describes how recognition of these differences can improve public health services. In part one, he describes the four components of the Johari window (arena, facade, blind spot, and the unknown) and how this group dynamics tool relates to self perception and public image. He also demonstrates how individuals have their own unique Johari windows that show the amount of information they share or recognize about themselves. In part two, Dr. Keogh details four communication styles (practice, social, analytical, and conceptual) and presents tips for how to “style flex” and improve communication. After watching a short video of a work interaction, learners are encouraged to complete short, open-ended workbook questions that are answered in a video debrief. A post-quiz is used to reinforce learning.

Learning Objectives: • Classify the impact of verbal and non-verbal communication. • Identify behavioral and communication styles. • Examine how we are seen by others. • Explain how different communication styles clash. • Describe how to adjust to the different communication styles. • Weigh the perspectives of others.

Special Instructions: Registration to the South Central Public Health Partnership is required. For new users it will take one weekday to receive an access email. If you are registered in TRAIN, login using that username and password. Click on “Course Offerings” and search for “Improving Your Communication Skills.”

Motivational Interviewing: Supporting Patients in Health Behavior Change. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: Upper Midwest Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): Rebecca Lang EdD, RDH, CHES. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This course is designed to equip healthcare providers and ancillary staff with the knowledge and tools to optimize patient behavior change to ultimately improve health outcomes. The following are the topics that will be covered in this course: • Components of Motivational Interviewing (MI) • Benefits of Using Motivational Interviewing • Traditional Expert-Centered Model vs. MI Patient-Centered Model • Principles of Motivational Interviewing • Readiness to Elicit Change Talk

Learning Objectives: • Implement effective patient communication strategies based on individualized readiness to make a behavior change. • Increase healthcare providers’ knowledge on the importance and utilization of the patient-centered model of behavior change. • Implement motivational interviewing techniques during patient visits for improved health outcomes.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: 0.12 CEU/CE; 1 Dietitians CPE

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $225,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.