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Displaying records 11 through 15 of 15 found.

Telling Your Program's Story: Learning Brief. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): MCH Navigator. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: The purpose of this learning brief is to provide resources that support storytelling in public health. In turn, this will aide health professionals’ understanding of: • What a success story is. • Why it is important to tell success stories. • What tools and strategies are available to develop success stories. The five elements of this framework are based on the plenary session for the Division of MCH Workforce Development Grantee Virtual Meeting (09/26/18), “How to Tell Your Program’s Story to Key Stakeholders,” given by Deborah Klein Walker, Ed.D.

Learning Objectives: • Understanding what a success story is. • Learning why it is important to tell success stories. • Equipping yourself with the tools and strategies are available to develop success stories.

National Institutes of Health Plain Language Online Training. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: National Institutes of Health. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: In order to communicate health and research messages clearly, the National Institutes of Health suggests using plain language for all documents, presentations, and electronic messages. Plain language is characterized by: • Common, everyday words except for necessary technical terms • Personal pronouns (“we” and “you”) • Active voice • Logical organization • An easy-to-read format, including bullets, tables and free use of whitespace. This Computer-Based Training (CBT) module was developed to introduce health professionals to the basics of plain language. Modules one through seven contain tales of medical history, some exercises, and a summary. The eighth module contains optional exercises for additional practice. A list of websites for use by participants to continue expanding professional writing skills is also provided.

Learning Objectives: • Learn to organize ideas. • Develop a clear writing style. • Learn the skills necessary to become a more effective communicator.

Continuing Education: Certificate of completion offered.

Motivational Interviewing: Supporting Patients in Health Behavior Change. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: Upper Midwest Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): Rebecca Lang EdD, RDH, CHES. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This course is designed to equip healthcare providers and ancillary staff with the knowledge and tools to optimize patient behavior change to ultimately improve health outcomes. The following are the topics that will be covered in this course: • Components of Motivational Interviewing (MI) • Benefits of Using Motivational Interviewing • Traditional Expert-Centered Model vs. MI Patient-Centered Model • Principles of Motivational Interviewing • Readiness to Elicit Change Talk

Learning Objectives: • Implement effective patient communication strategies based on individualized readiness to make a behavior change. • Increase healthcare providers’ knowledge on the importance and utilization of the patient-centered model of behavior change. • Implement motivational interviewing techniques during patient visits for improved health outcomes.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: 0.12 CEU/CE; 1 Dietitians CPE

Grant Writing. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: Upper Midwest Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): Jane Schadle RNC, MSHA. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This course is part of a the New Public Health Administrators Series, a 14 hour-long online program targeted toward new public health administrators and nursing administrators. This course may be taken by itself, or as part of the New Public Health Admin (NPHA) Curriculum. Grant Writing, by Jane Schadle - consists of a one hour video segment which is accessible via video streaming technology. PowerPoint slides of the presentation are provided in PDF format. Participants will be assessed through practice exercises and an online post-test.

Learning Objectives: • Identify grant awarding organizations in Iowa. • Describe the steps involved in preparing a grant application. • Describe the resources needed in preparing a grant application. • Discuss the reporting obligations once a grant is awarded. • Discuss the implications of grant awards to agency budgets.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you need to register. See the "Register for this Training" link at the bottom of the page.

Contracts. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: Upper Midwest Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): Mary Ralston. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This course is part of a the New Public Health Administrators Series, a 14 hour-long online program targeted toward new public health administrators and nursing administrators. This course may be taken by itself, or as part of the New Public Health Admin (NPHA) Curriculum.

Learning Objectives: • List three reasons why it is important to put agreements in writing. • Describe the major elements of a contract. • Describe the major guidelines for writing an effective contract. • Describe at least two examples of actual contracts used by local public health.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $225,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.