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MCH Policy and Advocacy: A Focused Look. Year Developed: 2018. Source: University of Illinois at Chicago. Presenter(s): Arden Handler, DrPH. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Advanced. Length: 75 minutes total, broken up into 10 short videos.

Annotation: This learning opportunity was recorded from the 2018 policy and advocacy lecture that Dr. Handler presented to her class at the University of Illinois at Chicago. It is divided in 10 short videos for ease of engagement. In the presentation, she outlines key advocacy components, the difference between case and class advocacy, and a review of policy and advocacy through the history of MCH. She explains current trends and the need for ongoing education and advocacy at national, state, and local levels. It concludes with current advocacy laws and a summary of the topic grounded in the current public health environment.

Learning Objectives: • Understand the strategic differences between advocacy and community organizing/community empowerment strategies. class issues, compromise, internal vs. external agents of change, and the difference between advocacy from the left and from the right. • Be able to to connect women and children's topics when advocating for services and discusses using children as a population group to address broader issues of social justice. • Synthesize the differences of case and class advocacy. • Become familiar with the history of advocacy related to MCH. • Understand how the advocacy process works. • Be able to use strategies in three main categories to advance MCH topic areas. • Be able to develop a plan to follow current lobbying laws appropriately.

Technical Assistance: Foundations of Grant Writing. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Office of Minority Health. Presenter(s): Michelle Loosli, Margaret Korto. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 90 minutes. 2013 version

Annotation: This introductory webinar, for community-based organizations that want to respond to federal funding opportunity announcements, covered the basics -- from how to register in the System for Award Management (SAM) to the key sections in funding announcements to successful strategies for responding.

Learning Objectives: • Identify key steps to apply for federal grants • Review the critical elements of proposals and grants • Discuss strategies related to federal competitions

Special Instructions: Registration required to view archive.

Introduction to Proposal Writing. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Foundation Center. Presenter(s): Caroline Herbert. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 28 minutes. YouTube Video

Annotation: This webinar describes the proposal writing process, through answering frequently encountered questions, and providing examples of the various sections of a proposal. It is most applicable to research or program project proposals. Specifically, the webinar reviews proposal planning, contents, and packaging; it also addresses the steps to take after submission. The webinar is offered both in recorded form, as a self-paced elearning course, and live on certain dates; it is also available in Spanish.

Learning Objectives: • How the proposal fits into the overall grant-seeking process. • What to include in a standard proposal to a foundation. • Tips for making each section of your proposal stronger. • What funders expect to see in your proposal and attachments. • Tips for communicating with funders during the grant process. • Additional resources on proposal writing, including sample proposals.

Special Instructions: To access presentation, scroll down to "Online Classes" click on "Introduction to Proposal Writing Webinar". The next page will have a link "Watch the Webinar" at the bottom of the page.

Fundamentals of Writing a Responsive Grant Application. Year Developed: 2015. Source: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Webcast. Level: Intermediate. Length: 78 minutes.

Annotation: Topics include grant application basics; writing a narrative that matches review criteria; how application pieces fit together to respond to the funding opportunity announcement; and a question and answer session with grant management experts. Links to additional downloadable materials are included.

Planning and Budgeting for Public Health: Part II - The Budget. Year Developed: 2013. Source: University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Anne Barry, JD, MPH. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate Introductory. Length: Self-paced. List of all courses

Annotation: All in the practice of public health know the importance of financial resources to carry out their activities. This very basic introduction course provides a definition of the growing field of public health finance, assists students to develop a working knowledge of the planning cycles in governmental public health organizations, understand how to navigate and use budget planning documents, forecasts, governmental financial statements, and grants to support important public health activities and priorities.

Learning Objectives: • Define public health finance • Describe the Minnesota budget and forecast process • Explore public finance using examples from Minnesota health department s budget • Develop an understanding of financial statements • Understand the basics of grant proposals

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: 0.1 CEU/CE; 1 CPHCE

Planning and Budgeting for Public Health: Part I - The Business Plan. Year Developed: 2013. Source: University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Anne Barry, JD, MPH. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: Self-paced. List of all courses

Annotation: Practitioners in the field of public health find themselves in serious competition for funding. How do we make sure that the activities we advance to protect, maintain and promote the health of the public are a priority for funders. One of the ways we can improve our chances is to make a strong business case for our work. This brief overview will give you a simple outline to assist you in building a business plan for public health activities.

Learning Objectives: • Define public health finance. • Identify three major domains of public health finance competencies (knowledge, skills, and abilities needed in practice). • Describe the financial cycle within organizations. • Explain the reasons for a business plan. • List the major sections of a business plan template.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: 0.1 CEU/CE; 1 CPHCE

Communicating Science: Translating Research for Policy and Practice. Year Developed: 2013. Source: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women’s and Children’s Health Policy Center. Presenter(s): Marjory Ruderman, MHS. Type: Video Slide Module. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: 19 minutes.

Annotation: This presentation provides a broad overview of the rationales for and barriers to taking action to ensure that public health science is communicated beyond academic journals and applied to efforts to improve health for individuals and populations. Cameo video commentary from public information staff of the Institute of Medicine is used to share strategies for being competitive in the marketplace of ideas that interventions and policies are derived from. Downloadable slides and a transcript of the presentation are provided at <http://www.jhsph.edu/research/centers-and-institutes/womens-and-childrens-health-policy-center/writing-skills/Transcript-Translational-Writing.pdf>.

Learning Objectives: • Learn the importance of translating research. • Understand the characteristics of both academic researchers and policymakers. • Learn best practices for health professionals to communicate science for use in policy and practice.

An Editor’s Perspective on Preparing, Reviewing and Selecting Manuscripts for Publication. Year Developed: 2013. Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists. Presenter(s): Samuel F. Posner, PhD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Advanced. Length: 65 minutes. Webinar slides

Annotation: This webinar presents helpful hints and common problems in manuscript preparation, submission, review and publication processes. It begins by discussing why publication is important and the benefits of professional publication. The webinar covers the process of preparing a manuscript, including style considerations, common submission mistakes, and the steps for submission. The presenter discusses the manuscript review and selection process and gives information on how to respond to reviewers as well as what to expect after a manuscript has been accepted.

Special Instructions: This presentation consists of a webinar recording (WMV) and a set of 20 slides (PDF) from the speaker. Allow time for the recording to download.

Writing Briefing Memos. Year Developed: 2012. Source: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women’s and Children’s Health Policy Center. Presenter(s): Marjory Ruderman, MHS. Type: Video Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 15 minutes.

Annotation: This presentation focuses on the nature, elements and specific uses of briefing memos, and tips for writing good ones. By comparing memo writing to the Ikea business model, Ms. Ruderman discusses solutions to writing an effective memo, including using clear visual cues and logical paths, focusing on the memo’s purpose, avoiding jargon, simplifying sentence structure, and presenting and concluding data effectively.

Learning Objectives: • Understand what a briefing memo is and why you would write one. • Describe the IKEA Effect. • Learn how to present data effectively.

Writing Policy Briefs: A Guide to Translating Science and Engaging Stakeholders. Year Developed: 2011. Source: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women’s and Children’s Health Policy Center. Presenter(s): Marjory Ruderman, MHS. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Introductory Advanced. Length: 18 minutes.

Annotation: The challenges, art and craft of writing documents intended to translate science to action (policy, programs, services) are the subjects of this distance education module. While the primary intended audiences are public health students and practicing professionals, faculty at public health and other MCH training and education programs may find useful tools in this module. Learning objectives give emphasis to basic elements and structure of policy briefs, and to skills development in synthesizing data and information in order to communicate effectively with non-science audiences. The module offers an introductory lecture, examples of the skills in action, and structured exercises for completing the process of writing your own policy brief.

Learning Objectives: • Understand the basic elements of a policy brief. • Identify the information needs of different audiences. • Synthesize data to convey policy implications. • Craft concise language. • Organize information effectively.

Special Instructions: To access video, click “Play Lecture” next to “A. Video Lecture: The Art and Craft of Policy Briefs.”

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.