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Displaying records 21 through 30 of 94 found.

Crafting Richer Public Health Messages using Moral Foundations Theory. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Network for Public Health Law. Presenter(s): Gene Matthews; Scott Burris. Type: Webinar. Level: Advanced. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: Effective messaging of public health challenges and interventions is essential to public health practice and especially to implementing public health laws and policies in a polarized political environment. It is easy for public health leaders to become consumed with the ongoing political and resource shifts taking place in public health and health care. However, it is also clear that those in public health, at all levels, want to engage more deeply and meaningfully with communities of all backgrounds who are burdened by poor health. Using Moral Foundations Theory, the speakers explain how liberals and conservative audiences resonate differently to six intuitive foundational moral values. This session explores crafting messages that embrace all six foundational values so that public health practitioners may engage a broader base of support and develop new community partnerships.

Special Instructions: Slides and videos for all three parts of this series are available on the series link.

Continuing Education: Individuals may qualify for CLE credit. ASLME is an approved provider of continuing legal education credits in several states ASLME will also apply for CLE credits in other states upon request.

CPH Study Session Webinar: Biostatistics. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Board of Public Health Examiners. Presenter(s): Lisa Sullivan, PhD. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 180 minutes. Slides

Annotation: This course presents a detailed overview of biostatistics, terminology and definitions, and practice questions. It includes how data can be displayed and hypothesis testing procedures.

Learning Objectives: • Summarize a sample selected from a population. • Make inferences about population parameters based on sample statistics.

Communication Training for Comprehensive Cancer Control Professionals 102: Making Communication Campaigns Evidence-Based. Year Developed: 2017. Source: GW Cancer Center Institute for Patient-Centered Initiatives and Health Equity. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: 270 minutes. Link for enrollment in the course

Annotation: This free online training is the second of a two-part series on cancer control communication and is designed for participants who desire more in-depth training about the process of organizing a communication campaign. Interactive learning modules walk you through important concepts of collecting and using evidence in communication campaigns, developing campaign messages and using appropriate tactics and channels to reach intended audiences, planning for campaign evaluation and launching your campaign.

Learning Objectives: • Create an evidence-based communication campaign. • Implement an evidence-based communication campaign. • Evaluate an evidence-based communication campaign.

Special Instructions: Enrollment required prior to accessing course.

Communication Training for Comprehensive Cancer Control Professionals 101: Media Planning and Media Relations. Year Developed: 2017. Source: GW Cancer Center Institute for Patient-Centered Initiatives and Health Equity. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 210 minutes. Link for enrollment in the course

Annotation: This free online training walks participants through the process of media planning, creating media-friendly materials and building relationships with journalists. It includes background information, resources and customizable templates, so after completing the training, you will have a tailored media plan and media-ready materials for your cancer control program to use.

Learning Objectives: • Describe health communication, social marketing and media advocacy. • Describe the role of health literacy and media literacy in public health communication. • Apply media planning and strategic principles in public health communication. • Discuss the importance of media relationships and media friendly materials.

Special Instructions: Enrollment required prior to accessing course.

Collaborating Across Cultures. Year Developed: 2017. Source: ASA Community of Applied Statisticians. Presenter(s): Charisse Kosova, M.Ad.Ed.. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 62 minutes.

Annotation: Collaborating across cultures can add an interesting global perspective to the work we do, but intercultural communication also comes with unique challenges. This session explored some of the research-based dimensions of culture that lead to differences in work style preferences and communication styles across cultures. By analyzing mini case studies in which culture interfered with collaboration, this session also offered simple tips and recommended adaptations that can lead to more rewarding and productive collaboration across cultures. A video and presentation slides are available.

CityMatCH Well-Woman Project Learning Network Webinar. Year Developed: 2017. Source: CityMatCH and University of Illinois Chicago School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Arden Handler. Type: Video. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 70 minutes.

Annotation: The Well-Woman Project aims to elevate women’s voices about what makes them healthy and able to receive well-woman care within their context of their lives, neighborhoods and cities.

The Use of Social Media to Enhance Communication and Dissemination. Year Developed: 2016. Source: Association of University Centers on Disabilities. Presenter(s): Courtney Taylor, Emma Shouse, Elizabeth Bishop, Francisca Guzman, Crystal K. Pariseau. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 73 minutes.

Annotation: In today's technological driven society, the use of social media continues to increase and impact the disability world. Social media has certainly become a means to communicate and disseminate information. This webinar features a panel of AUCD and Developmental Disabilities Network Partners and discusses some innovative statewide and national collaborations.

The Tool for Sharing Best Practices. Year Developed: 2016. Source: National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools. Presenter(s): Lisa Mwaikambo, MPH. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 58 minutes. presentation slides

Annotation: The Tool for Sharing Best Practices helps public health professionals by outlining five practical steps to share best practices throughout their organizations. Sharing best practices can help your organization learn from successes, replicate successful programs, and improve outcomes.

Resiliency: Tips and Tricks on How to Keep Staff Morale High. Year Developed: 2016. Source: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Presenter(s): Kris Risley, PhD. Type: n.a.. Level: Intermediate. Length: n.a..

Annotation: Success of an organization/department depends on the employees who work there. The morale among staff must be high to have high performing staff. Sometimes when organizational changes occur, the morale can go down. For this webinar, Kris Risley, Clinical Assistant Professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago provided tips and tricks to keep staff morale high by using appreciative inquiry and positive questions to bring out the best of the organization/department/team. Dr. Risley also discussed the importance of emotional intelligence and the impact you have on your organization/department.

Listening Before We Speak: Understanding Our Audience in Times of Disaster #SomosSocial . Year Developed: 2016. Source: Federal Emergency Management Agency, Digitalgov. Presenter(s): Daniel Llargues, Lucia Castro Herrera. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: 57 minutes.

Annotation: Who is the audience? What is the social conversation? Those are the most common questions that tools like social listening can address to better understand your audience and their needs. Listening to the needs and concerns of your audience, and understanding how they use social media ultimately helps drive more informed content strategy and better allows us to be a part of the conversation. In times of disaster, the specific needs and ways to communicate with English speaking communities and Spanish speaking communities sometimes are different and often confused. In this webinar we will share our experience implementing social listening as a tool directed to our Spanish speaking audience and how to partner with other reliable sources to provide relevant content at every stage of the disaster. In addition, we will share lessons learned and best practices about our engagement. The webinar is aimed at: Anyone interested in social listening for Spanish speaking markets in the United States Digital and social media managers with content responsibilities in Spanish Anyone interested in social media, disasters and communications with limited English proficiency communities

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $225,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.