Edit Your Search

Level:

Accessible:

Continuing Education:


New Search

Search Results

Search Results

Displaying records 1 through 10 of 15 found.

Where To Find MCH Resources: An Introduction. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health. Presenter(s): Keisha Watson and John Richards. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Introductory. Length: 18 minutes.

Annotation: This short presentation discusses the information needs of MCH professionals and identifies distinct online resources to address those needs, from pop and professional sources such as Google, PubMed, and Wikipedia to grant-supported resources that address MCHB topical programs and initiatives. Topics include data warehouses, research centers, epidemiology sites, professional and membership organizations

Learning Objectives: • Identify information needs of professionals • Explain the differences between types of online resources • Differentiate between trusted and questionable online resources • Understand where to go to find additional resources

Data-Driven Leadership: Lead with Data-Driven Decisions and Predictive Analytics. Year Developed: 2016. Source: GovLoop. Presenter(s): Alan S. Berson. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Introductory. Length: 20 minutes.

Annotation: Leading with the cold hard facts can be a reassuring method to know you’re making the best decisions for your organization. But this can be challenging at times when you have to discern between “good” data and “bad” data. Harnessing methods for data analysis is easier said than done, but it can make all the difference in leading your organization. This course is led by Dr. Henry Thibodeaux, Assessment and Evaluations Leader in the Office of Personnel Management, and Allen Schweyer, Executive Director of Talent Management and Leadership University. The course comprises an overview and introduction, 5 lessons, and a post-course survey.

Learning Objectives: • Discern the difference between correlation and causation. • Understand the importance of framing data analysis with precise questions and objectives. • Learn to distinguish “good” data from “bad” data. • Gain familiarity with several common data analysis techniques and where they should be used.

Continuing Education: GovLoop is registered with the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA) as a sponsor of continuing professional education on the National Registry of CPE Sponsors.

Big Data in Early Childhood; Using Integrated Data to Guide Impact. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Presenter(s): Elizabeth Anthony, PhD; Jen Leone, MPH; Rebekah Dorman, PhD. Type: Video Conference. Level: Intermediate Introductory. Length: 63 minutes.

Annotation: This video conference profiles a large urban county experience in creating a unique integrated database comprised of public and private sector records on children zero‐six years of age. This community’s experience serves as a powerful example of how data can inform the decision making of funders, policymakers and providers. The presentation includes a description of how the integrated child well‐being database was created over 12 years, as well as how it is utilized on an ongoing basis to inform policy and practice. With records on more than 400,000 children born in the county, the data system links together information on births, child maltreatment, receipt of public assistance, as well as engagement in programming such as home visiting, child care, and mental health services. Collectively, the experience of over a decade shows the power of data in informing policy and program improvement. The presentation also addresses the challenges that have been faced and overcome regarding practical issues around data sharing agreements and securing data from many different public and private providers into an integrated dataset. It also addresses how to build a strong relationship between the government officials, academics, and the program providers so that trust and collaboration form the basis for improving the services available to children and their families.

Science Impact. Year Developed: 2014. Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Presenter(s): Harvey Fineberg, MD, PhD; Mary Ari, PhD. Type: Webcast. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This special edition of Grand Rounds examined the CDC Science Impact Framework, its development, use underway and opportunities and challenges associated with implementing it across the diverse areas of public health. The Framework utilizes a combination of quantitative and qualitative indicators to measure impact towards health outcomes, through five levels of influence: disseminating science, creating awareness, catalyzing action, effecting change, and shaping the future. The complex dynamics between the levels of influence and the intricate environment in which influence materializes create a path of impact which does not necessarily follow a linear progression. The learning opportunity addresses what kind of impact CDC science has; if published research is likely to have impact on a significant health outcome; and how research findings can be used towards significant improvements in public health practice and policy.

Identifying and Using Evidence-Based/Informed Resources to Address MCH Issues Training Brief. Year Developed: 2014. Source: MCH Navigator, National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Advanced. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This training brief provides links to selected trainings and related tools on the topic of evidence-based and informed resources to address MCH issues. It is one in a set of MCH Navigator resources developed to support the MCH workforce’s efforts to improve access to health care; use quality improvement tools to guide effective transformation; foster integration within public health and across sectors; support change management that will result in health improvements for MCH populations; and enhance training and networking opportunities.

The Role and Use of Evidence in Policy. Year Developed: 2013 est.3.. Source: Wisconsin Center for Public Health Education and Training. Presenter(s): Elizabeth Feder, PhD. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: 120 minutes.

Annotation: This course focuses on how public health professionals can better promote the use of their own work in policy discussions. Participants will explore how evidence is used in policy-making, and how sometimes policy decisions are made despite contrary evidence. The use of evidence may vary, depending upon the political process, so participants will consider several theoretical models of the policy process and what they imply about the use of evidence. This training also addresses how to improve evidence use and the role of knowledge brokers as well as how to frame messages for different audiences.

Learning Objectives: • Describe how evidence is used in policy making. • Identify how the use of evidence in policy making can be improved. • Discover ways in which you can better promote the use of your work in the policy discussions.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Writing Briefing Memos. Year Developed: 2012. Source: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women’s and Children’s Health Policy Center. Presenter(s): Marjory Ruderman, MHS. Type: Video Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 15 minutes.

Annotation: This presentation focuses on the nature, elements and specific uses of briefing memos, and tips for writing good ones. By comparing memo writing to the Ikea business model, Ms. Ruderman discusses solutions to writing an effective memo, including using clear visual cues and logical paths, focusing on the memo’s purpose, avoiding jargon, simplifying sentence structure, and presenting and concluding data effectively.

Learning Objectives: • Understand what a briefing memo is and why you would write one. • Describe the IKEA Effect. • Learn how to present data effectively.

Quality Improvement Principles and Getting Started. Year Developed: 2012. Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Webcast. Level: Introductory. Length: 84 minutes.

Annotation: This webcast presents an overview of core Quality Improvement principles as applied to improving the quality of perinatal and maternal care. It includes a discussion of the Model for Improvement, topic selection, and identifying measurable changes that can be tested. The webcast concludes with participant questions about how collaboratives in the presenters' states have applied these principles to their projects.

Special Instructions: Scroll down the page and click on the webinar to listen to it.

Writing Policy Briefs: A Guide to Translating Science and Engaging Stakeholders. Year Developed: 2011. Source: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women’s and Children’s Health Policy Center. Presenter(s): Marjory Ruderman, MHS. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Introductory Advanced. Length: 18 minutes.

Annotation: The challenges, art and craft of writing documents intended to translate science to action (policy, programs, services) are the subjects of this distance education module. While the primary intended audiences are public health students and practicing professionals, faculty at public health and other MCH training and education programs may find useful tools in this module. Learning objectives give emphasis to basic elements and structure of policy briefs, and to skills development in synthesizing data and information in order to communicate effectively with non-science audiences. The module offers an introductory lecture, examples of the skills in action, and structured exercises for completing the process of writing your own policy brief.

Learning Objectives: • Understand the basic elements of a policy brief. • Identify the information needs of different audiences. • Synthesize data to convey policy implications. • Craft concise language. • Organize information effectively.

Special Instructions: To access video, click “Play Lecture” next to “A. Video Lecture: The Art and Craft of Policy Briefs.”

Using the Evidence-Based Public Health Framework to Move Policy Forward . Year Developed: 2011. Source: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. Presenter(s): Dr. Ross Brownson. Type: Webcast. Level: Introductory. Length: 20-25 minutes.

Annotation: Dr. Brownson is a Professor of Epidemiology at Washington University in St. Louis. Dr. Brownson is the author of six books and over 280 peer-reviewed articles. His books include Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control, Applied Epidemiology, Handbook of Obesity Prevention, Communicating Public Health Information Effectively: A Guide for Practitioners, and Evidence-Based Public Health.

Learning Objectives: • Understand how the seven-stage EBPH framework can inform evidence-based policies. • Learn how to enhance evidence based public health through the EBPH framework.

Special Instructions: This course provider requires additional registration and/or a fee outside of TRAIN. Click on the 'Go to Step 2 of Registration' button to add this course to 'My Learning' and proceed to the course provider's website.

Next »

New Search View My Citations

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.