Edit Your Search

Level:

Accessible:

Continuing Education:


New Search

Search Results

Search Results

Displaying records 1 through 7 of 7 found.

Using Population Data to Complement Fatality Review Data: An Overview of CDC WONDER and Perinatal Periods of Risk (PPOR). Year Developed: 2018. Source: National Center for Fatality Review and Prevention. Presenter(s): Sigrid A. Economou; Carol Gilbert, MS. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Fatality review includes information often not available through routine quantitative methods. Population data, such as vital statistics, are frequently used to complement fatality review findings. This presentation includes a demonstration of the CDC WONDER, an integrated information and communication system for public health developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The webinar also introduces participants to Perinatal Periods of Risk (PPOR), a comprehensive approach to help communities use data to reduce infant mortality. The webinar defines population based data, its limitations, limitations of case review data, how to interpret data in light of other evidence, different uses of data, PPOR analytic steps, and how FIMR and PPOR can work together. Available are the archive, slides, questions and answers, a handout, and information about CDC WONDER.

Using Administrative Data to Address Policy-Relevant Research Questions in Early Care and Education. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Child Trends. Presenter(s): Kelly Maxwell, Isabel Bradburn, Van-Kim Lin, Elizabeth Davis, and Amy Claessens. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 85 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar highlights 3 resources that can assist researchers in using early care and education administrative data. Additionally, it provides researchers' perspectives based on experience throughout their projects. The first resource examines the benefits of and strategies for developing collaborative partnerships with researchers and state agencies. The second resource was created to help researchers determine the feasibility of using administrative data by posing questions related to data policies and procedures, data contacts and coordination, and data usability. The third resource presents topics to consider when preparing to analyze administrative data to address child care and early education research questions.

Addressing Infant Mortality Expert Webinar Series. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Institute for Children's Health Quality. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Webinar Series. Level: Advanced. Length: n.a..

Annotation: The multi-part webinar series is an opportunity for public health professionals to hear experts and influencers in the maternal and child health field share examples and best practices for supporting efforts to reduce infant mortality and improve maternal and infant health. Participants take away actionable insights that contribute to the goal of every child reaching his or her first birthday and beyond. Scheduled webinars are: 1. The Residual Impact of Historical Structural Inequities: Connecting Residential Segregation and Mortgage Discrimination to Current Infant Mortality and Breastfeeding Rates 7/27/2017 2. Learning from Rare Events Infant Mortality Data 8/22/17 3. The Role of State Health Leaders in Addressing Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome 8/31/17 4. Exploring State Medicaid Performance Measures, Improvement Projects, & Incentives to Promote Improvement in Women's Health Services and Perinatal Outcomes 9/18/17 5. The Prematurity Campaign Collaborative 9/25/17 6. Aligning State and Local Health Departments to Improve Maternal and Child Health 9/28/2017 7. Big Wins and Next Steps in Addressing Infant Mortality 11/15/2017

Learning Objectives: Webinar 2: 1. Determine which statistical process control (SPC) charts are most effective for small numbers and rare events data reporting and learning 2. Describe how to make and interpret SPC charts for rare events 3. Identify ways to use small numbers data to identify progress and improvement as a result of IM CoIIN activities 4. Plan how to best share and present data with small numbers to team members and stakeholders 5. Interpret the stratification of IM data (e.g. by racial groups) when it involves small numbers Webinar 3: 1. Explain primary, secondary and tertiary prevention strategies for Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome 2. Identify innovative interventions for prevention being employed by states targeting Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome 3. Describe how to work collaboratively across state and community partner to prevent Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome 4. Identify non-traditional partners that states can work with collaboratively to address Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome Webinar 5: 1. Describe the goals and structure of the March of Dimes Prematurity Campaign Collaborative 2. Identify opportunities to partner in the areas of intentionality and birth spacing, increasing access to 17 P and addressing social determinants of health 3. Explain consumer-focused communications strategies and how to get involved.

Multivariable Approaches for Supporting the MCH Planning Cycle I: Stratified Analysis and Bias. Year Developed: 2015. Source: CityMatCH. Presenter(s): Deb Rosenberg, PhD. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Advanced. Length: 25 slides. Slides

Annotation: This webinar for the 2015 Training Course in MCH Epidemiology discusses bias and confounding, confounding and effect modification, the example of ACES and mental health, stratified analysis, and linear models.

Clusters, Maps, and Hotspots: Small Area Analysis in Maternal and Child Health. Year Developed: 2015. Source: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Presenter(s): Russell S. Kirby, PhD, MS, FACE; Michael Kramer, PhD, MMSc; Thomas J. Stopka, PhD, MHS . Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Maternal and child health professionals are increasingly interested in how health outcomes, risk factors, and health resources vary over space and time. Knowledge about how these factors differ across small segments of the population, such as across different counties or neighborhoods, can help health professionals design interventions for the populations who are most at need. Innovative and rigorous small area analyses are needed to help inform public health decisions that can improve maternal and child health. This DataSpeak presentation gives an overview of the applications of small area analysis for maternal and child health with real world examples based on these analyses.

Learning Objectives: • Review basic principles of mapping and its uses for studying spatial aspects of health phenomena. • Introduction to small area analysis.

Special Instructions: DataSpeak uses a number of different technologies. To get the most out of the information, please review the technical requirements at http://hrsa.gov/archive/mchb/dataspeak/techreq/index.html

Big Data in Early Childhood; Using Integrated Data to Guide Impact. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Presenter(s): Elizabeth Anthony, PhD; Jen Leone, MPH; Rebekah Dorman, PhD. Type: Video Conference. Level: Intermediate Introductory. Length: 63 minutes.

Annotation: This video conference profiles a large urban county experience in creating a unique integrated database comprised of public and private sector records on children zero‐six years of age. This community’s experience serves as a powerful example of how data can inform the decision making of funders, policymakers and providers. The presentation includes a description of how the integrated child well‐being database was created over 12 years, as well as how it is utilized on an ongoing basis to inform policy and practice. With records on more than 400,000 children born in the county, the data system links together information on births, child maltreatment, receipt of public assistance, as well as engagement in programming such as home visiting, child care, and mental health services. Collectively, the experience of over a decade shows the power of data in informing policy and program improvement. The presentation also addresses the challenges that have been faced and overcome regarding practical issues around data sharing agreements and securing data from many different public and private providers into an integrated dataset. It also addresses how to build a strong relationship between the government officials, academics, and the program providers so that trust and collaboration form the basis for improving the services available to children and their families.

Basic Concepts in Data Analysis for Community Health Assessment. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: Washington State Department of Health, Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 45-60 minutes per module, 5 modules.

Annotation: This 5 module series discusses various data sources that are commonly used for public health assessment and how to analyze and interpret data for public health purposes. Participants will learn how to identify data sources as well as identify their strengths and limitations for public health research.

Learning Objectives: Module 1--Overview of Public Health Data • Define screening. • Identify uses of data in public health core functions. • List at least three common data sources used to characterize the health or disease status of the community. • List five key attributes of data. • List three elements to consider when assessing data quality. Module 2--Analysis and Interpretation of Public Health Data, Part 1 • Explain the purpose of descriptive epidemiology and how it is used for assessment. • Describe why rates are important in doing assessment. • Name three kinds of rates. • Describe the two types of summary measures. • Explain the purpose of standardizing rates through age adjustment. Module 3--Analysis and Interpretation of Public Health Data, Part 2 • List six measures commonly used in public health. • Describe the difference between uses of incidence and prevalence rates. • Explain different ways to measure statistically significant difference. • Describe how to deal with the problems of unstable rates and small numbers. Module 4--Data Available to Public Health Professionals • List the eight Washington data sources commonly used for public health assessment. • Describe characteristics of each data set and how each set is used in assessment activities. • Describe where to access each data source. Module 5--Presenting Public Health Data • List the common ways to present data. • Choose an appropriate format to present specific kinds of data. • Identify good design practices for tables and charts.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account.

New Search View My Citations

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.