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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 12 found.

Innovations in Federal Surveys to Assess the Impacts of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Children & Families. Year Developed: 2022. Source: Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Presenter(s): Michael Kogan, Reem Ghandour, Jessica Jones, Anika Schenck-Fontaine, & Olivia Sappenfield. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 74. minutes.

Annotation: Over the past two years, the COVID-19 pandemic has caused significant disruptions in the lives of U.S. children and their families, including their health, health care access, receipt of intervention and other services, education, and child care arrangements. Accordingly, HRSA MCHB has taken steps to ensure that public health programs are prepared to meet these challenges and that researchers have access to relevant data. This symposium provides participants with an overview of resources for both immediate and long-term analytic needs. Specifically, this session presents three projects to collect data on the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on children and their families: The National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH), a new longitudinal cohort study of past NSCH respondents to launch in 2023, and the results of MCHB-sponsored content included in the Census Bureau’s weekly Household Pulse Survey.

Learning Objectives: • Discuss overviews of three projects to collect data on the impacts of COVID-19 on children and families. • Learn survey content and how to access survey data. • Review relevant timelines of data availability.

How to Develop a Successful Research Career. Year Developed: 2022. Source: Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Presenter(s): Jessica Rast MPH, Paul Shattuck PhD, MSW. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar seeks to highlight strategies for successfully carrying out research and disseminating findings, and build a long-lasting research career. One presenter will discuss experiences as a research associate on a MCHB/DoR award then becoming a Principal Investigator. The other presenter will provide guidance on forming collaborations, expanding research with various funding streams, and translating research into practice.

Learning Objectives: • Learn about the journey from a Research Associate to a Principal Investigator • Understand how to collaborate and form relationships • Become familiar with expanding research with various funding streams • Learn strategies for working with policy-makers and disseminating knowledge for policy impact.

Ensuring the Data System Used for Public Health Centers Equity and Well-Being. Year Developed: 2022. Source: Mathematica. Presenter(s): Dawn Heisey-Grove, Alastair Matheson, Alonzo Plough, Artair Rogers, Vivian Singletary, Deliya Banda Wesley. Type: Video. Level: Intermediate. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: Efforts are underway to reimagine and transform the data system used in public health so it doesn’t just identify, manage, and respond to disease—it also promotes holistic well-being. Plans for modernizing the public health data system must ensure that it supports a complete picture of all the communities affected by poor health outcomes—as well as the underlying reasons those communities are affected—to inform efforts to advance health equity. Doing so requires a data system that includes upstream influences on health, such as social determinants of health and the policies and systems that perpetuate inequities. It coordinates across public and private sectors. It is inclusive in terms of how and by whom the data are collected, analyzed, and interpreted, and it centers community involvement throughout the data life cycle. This virtual discussion includes experts who are leading efforts across the United States to reimagine public health data to become more effective at promoting the public’s health and addressing root causes of health inequities. These perspectives range across the sectors involved in generating, shaping, and interpreting public health data including philanthropy, local public health agencies, technology, and community-based organizations. The gathered experts will share their experience and vision for transforming the public health data system.

Learning Objectives: • Learn how public health data can be effective at promoting the public's health and addressing root causes of health equity • Learn multiple perspectives for transforming the public health data system

Using Critical Thinking to Advance MCH through Evidence. Year Developed: 2021. Source: National MCH Workforce Development Center. Presenter(s): John Richards. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 63 minutes.

Annotation: n this series of learning modules developed in collaboration with the MCH Navigator, we will discuss how the MCH Leadership Competencies — specifically those related to critical thinking (population data, critical analysis, research, epidemiology, and application of evidence-based practice guidelines) — form a supporting structure to: (1) understand the evidence base; (2) develop a plan to move from an analysis of populations needs to evidence-based/informed action steps to address those needs; and (3) use trusted tools to advance health equity within the framework of social determinants of health.

Learning Objectives: • Consider the role of a leader in identifying an issue or problem, framing it as a specific question, considering it from multiple perspectives, evaluating relevant information, and developing a reasoned resolution • Explain the process by which critical thinking informs and aids in addressing a clinical, organizational, community-based, or research challenge • Discuss how evidence-based decision making and implementation science are critical thinking skills

Using Population Data to Complement Fatality Review Data: An Overview of CDC WONDER and Perinatal Periods of Risk (PPOR). Year Developed: 2018. Source: National Center for Fatality Review and Prevention. Presenter(s): Sigrid A. Economou; Carol Gilbert, MS. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes. Slides

Annotation: Fatality review includes information often not available through routine quantitative methods. Population data, such as vital statistics, are frequently used to complement fatality review findings. This presentation includes a demonstration of the CDC WONDER, an integrated information and communication system for public health developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The webinar also introduces participants to Perinatal Periods of Risk (PPOR), a comprehensive approach to help communities use data to reduce infant mortality. The webinar defines population based data, its limitations, limitations of case review data, how to interpret data in light of other evidence, different uses of data, PPOR analytic steps, and how FIMR and PPOR can work together. Available are the archive, slides, questions and answers, a handout, and information about CDC WONDER.

Using Administrative Data to Address Policy-Relevant Research Questions in Early Care and Education. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Child Trends. Presenter(s): Kelly Maxwell, Isabel Bradburn, Van-Kim Lin, Elizabeth Davis, and Amy Claessens. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 85 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar highlights 3 resources that can assist researchers in using early care and education administrative data. Additionally, it provides researchers' perspectives based on experience throughout their projects. The first resource examines the benefits of and strategies for developing collaborative partnerships with researchers and state agencies. The second resource was created to help researchers determine the feasibility of using administrative data by posing questions related to data policies and procedures, data contacts and coordination, and data usability. The third resource presents topics to consider when preparing to analyze administrative data to address child care and early education research questions.

Addressing Infant Mortality Expert Webinar Series. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Institute for Children's Health Quality. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Webinar. Level: Advanced. Length: n.a..

Annotation: The multi-part webinar series is an opportunity for public health professionals to hear experts and influencers in the maternal and child health field share examples and best practices for supporting efforts to reduce infant mortality and improve maternal and infant health. Participants take away actionable insights that contribute to the goal of every child reaching his or her first birthday and beyond. Scheduled webinars are: 1. The Residual Impact of Historical Structural Inequities: Connecting Residential Segregation and Mortgage Discrimination to Current Infant Mortality and Breastfeeding Rates 7/27/2017 2. Learning from Rare Events Infant Mortality Data 8/22/17 3. The Role of State Health Leaders in Addressing Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome 8/31/17 4. Exploring State Medicaid Performance Measures, Improvement Projects, & Incentives to Promote Improvement in Women's Health Services and Perinatal Outcomes 9/18/17 5. The Prematurity Campaign Collaborative 9/25/17 6. Aligning State and Local Health Departments to Improve Maternal and Child Health 9/28/2017 7. Big Wins and Next Steps in Addressing Infant Mortality 11/15/2017

Learning Objectives: Webinar 2: 1. Determine which statistical process control (SPC) charts are most effective for small numbers and rare events data reporting and learning 2. Describe how to make and interpret SPC charts for rare events 3. Identify ways to use small numbers data to identify progress and improvement as a result of IM CoIIN activities 4. Plan how to best share and present data with small numbers to team members and stakeholders 5. Interpret the stratification of IM data (e.g. by racial groups) when it involves small numbers Webinar 3: 1. Explain primary, secondary and tertiary prevention strategies for Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome 2. Identify innovative interventions for prevention being employed by states targeting Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome 3. Describe how to work collaboratively across state and community partner to prevent Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome 4. Identify non-traditional partners that states can work with collaboratively to address Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome Webinar 5: 1. Describe the goals and structure of the March of Dimes Prematurity Campaign Collaborative 2. Identify opportunities to partner in the areas of intentionality and birth spacing, increasing access to 17 P and addressing social determinants of health 3. Explain consumer-focused communications strategies and how to get involved.

Multivariable Approaches for Supporting the MCH Planning Cycle I: Stratified Analysis and Bias. Year Developed: 2015. Source: CityMatCH. Presenter(s): Deb Rosenberg, PhD. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Advanced. Length: 25 slides. Slides

Annotation: This webinar for the 2015 Training Course in MCH Epidemiology discusses bias and confounding, confounding and effect modification, the example of ACES and mental health, stratified analysis, and linear models.

Clusters, Maps, and Hotspots: Small Area Analysis in Maternal and Child Health. Year Developed: 2015. Source: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Presenter(s): Russell S. Kirby, PhD, MS, FACE; Michael Kramer, PhD, MMSc; Thomas J. Stopka, PhD, MHS . Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 60 minutes. Slides

Annotation: Maternal and child health professionals are increasingly interested in how health outcomes, risk factors, and health resources vary over space and time. Knowledge about how these factors differ across small segments of the population, such as across different counties or neighborhoods, can help health professionals design interventions for the populations who are most at need. Innovative and rigorous small area analyses are needed to help inform public health decisions that can improve maternal and child health. This DataSpeak presentation gives an overview of the applications of small area analysis for maternal and child health with real world examples based on these analyses.

Learning Objectives: • Review basic principles of mapping and its uses for studying spatial aspects of health phenomena. • Introduction to small area analysis.

Special Instructions: Webinar recorded using Adobe Connect. Post-Webinar Q&As: https://mchb.hrsa.gov/sites/default/files/mchb/MaternalChildHealthInitiatives/dataspeak/aug2015qa.pdf Transcript: https://mchb.hrsa.gov/sites/default/files/mchb/MaternalChildHealthInitiatives/dataspeak/aug2015transcript.pdf

Big Data in Early Childhood; Using Integrated Data to Guide Impact. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Presenter(s): Elizabeth Anthony, PhD; Jen Leone, MPH; Rebekah Dorman, PhD. Type: Video. Level: Intermediate. Length: 63 minutes.

Annotation: This video conference profiles a large urban county experience in creating a unique integrated database comprised of public and private sector records on children zero‐six years of age. This community’s experience serves as a powerful example of how data can inform the decision making of funders, policymakers and providers. The presentation includes a description of how the integrated child well‐being database was created over 12 years, as well as how it is utilized on an ongoing basis to inform policy and practice. With records on more than 400,000 children born in the county, the data system links together information on births, child maltreatment, receipt of public assistance, as well as engagement in programming such as home visiting, child care, and mental health services. Collectively, the experience of over a decade shows the power of data in informing policy and program improvement. The presentation also addresses the challenges that have been faced and overcome regarding practical issues around data sharing agreements and securing data from many different public and private providers into an integrated dataset. It also addresses how to build a strong relationship between the government officials, academics, and the program providers so that trust and collaboration form the basis for improving the services available to children and their families.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $225,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.