Access trainings by the type of learning that matches your need:

Self Directed: Know what you want to learn?

Looking for some assistance to help you find what you're looking for?
MCHfast Guided Search

Still looking or need assistance? You can always ask for Help.

Semi-Structured: Looking for trainings grouped according to your need?

Self-Reflective. Not sure of your learning needs? Take the online Self-Assessment.

Fast & Focused. Want to learn on the go? Sign up for one of our Micro-learning programs.

Intense & Immersive. Looking for a comprehensive course that covers everything? Access the MCHsmart curriculum - Coming Soon.

Focus Areas. Need specialized resources?

Edit Your Search

Level:

Accessible:

Continuing Education:


New Search

Search Results

Search Results

Displaying records 11 through 20 of 23 found.

Crafting Richer Public Health Messages: Messaging and the 5 Essential Public Health Law Services. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Network for Public Health Law. Presenter(s): Scott Burris; Doug Blanke; Benjamin D. Winig. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: The 2016 Five Essential Public Health Law Services framework reflects the key scientific, legal, and advocacy activities necessary to support the timely adoption and diffusion of effective public health legal and policy interventions. The services are not all purely legal, nor are they provided only by lawyers. Instead, researchers and scientists, government officials and practitioners, and business, community, faith, and other leaders may all be involved in any given activity. The Five Essential Public Health Law Services were developed from and based upon public health law success stories, like that of tobacco control. In this webinar, the presenters explain their research over the past year exploring how this framework can be employed to more successfully advance public health law initiatives, with specific focus on preemption, housing code enforcement, and early childhood care and education. Presenters also discuss how the messaging used to advance public health laws, when crafted in a way that embraces the full range of intuitive moral values, may lead to broader community and political support for successfully developing, enacting and then enforcing new legal solutions.

Special Instructions: Slides and videos for all three parts of this series are available on the series link.

Continuing Education: Individuals may qualify for CLE credit. ASLME is an approved provider of continuing legal education credits in several states ASLME will also apply for CLE credits in other states upon request.

Crafting Richer Public Health Messages: Lessons and Examples for State and Local Advocacy. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Network for Public Health Law. Presenter(s): Sue Lynn Ledford, DrPH, MPA, BSN, RN; Alisahah Cole, MD; Gary Gunderson, DMin, DDiv. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: In turbulent political times, crafting public health messages that resonate across differing political ideologies is more important and challenging than ever. In this webinar, the presenters offer practical examples of how public health issues have been effectively communicated across party lines in the politically divided state of North Carolina through the application of Moral Foundations Theory. Examples include successfully advocating for sterile needle exchange, invoking community loyalty to support healthcare system collaborations using GIS mapping, and developing partnerships with faith communities to promote health. Based on these examples and a wealth of experience, the presenters will provide public health practitioners and advocates with tools, advice and strategies to assist them in looking deeper into distressed communities to understand the community’s values, needs, and complexity, and to focus locally to design solutions alongside diverse coalitions that may include faith networks, law enforcement, healthcare providers, and other (sometimes unexpected) stakeholders.

Special Instructions: Slides and videos for all three parts of this series are available on the series link.

Continuing Education: Individuals may qualify for CLE credit. ASLME is an approved provider of continuing legal education credits in several states ASLME will also apply for CLE credits in other states upon request.

Crafting Richer Public Health Messages using Moral Foundations Theory. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Network for Public Health Law. Presenter(s): Gene Matthews; Scott Burris. Type: Webinar. Level: Advanced. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: Effective messaging of public health challenges and interventions is essential to public health practice and especially to implementing public health laws and policies in a polarized political environment. It is easy for public health leaders to become consumed with the ongoing political and resource shifts taking place in public health and health care. However, it is also clear that those in public health, at all levels, want to engage more deeply and meaningfully with communities of all backgrounds who are burdened by poor health. Using Moral Foundations Theory, the speakers explain how liberals and conservative audiences resonate differently to six intuitive foundational moral values. This session explores crafting messages that embrace all six foundational values so that public health practitioners may engage a broader base of support and develop new community partnerships.

Special Instructions: Slides and videos for all three parts of this series are available on the series link.

Continuing Education: Individuals may qualify for CLE credit. ASLME is an approved provider of continuing legal education credits in several states ASLME will also apply for CLE credits in other states upon request.

Data-Driven Leadership: Lead with Data-Driven Decisions and Predictive Analytics. Year Developed: 2016. Source: GovLoop. Presenter(s): Alan S. Berson. Type: Video. Level: Advanced. Length: 20 minutes.

Annotation: Leading with the cold hard facts can be a reassuring method to know you’re making the best decisions for your organization. But this can be challenging at times when you have to discern between “good” data and “bad” data. Harnessing methods for data analysis is easier said than done, but it can make all the difference in leading your organization. This course is led by Dr. Henry Thibodeaux, Assessment and Evaluations Leader in the Office of Personnel Management, and Allen Schweyer, Executive Director of Talent Management and Leadership University. The course comprises an overview and introduction, 5 lessons, and a post-course survey.

Learning Objectives: • Discern the difference between correlation and causation. • Understand the importance of framing data analysis with precise questions and objectives. • Learn to distinguish “good” data from “bad” data. • Gain familiarity with several common data analysis techniques and where they should be used.

Continuing Education: GovLoop is registered with the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA) as a sponsor of continuing professional education on the National Registry of CPE Sponsors.

The Journey to a Quality Management Culture. Year Developed: 2015. Source: n.a.. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: In this one-hour webinar, which is part of the Hot Topics series, public health leaders from Washington State discuss how to authentically incorporate a quality management culture into big and small organizations. Slides, a slide handout, and other resources are included.

Learning Objectives: • Identify three agency infrastructure changes needed to institutionalize quality management. • Understand the initial steps for encouraging program staff to embrace quality management practices. • Identify three benefits experienced by two local public health departments that implemented quality management programs.

Strategic Planning in Public Health Overview. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Public Health Centers for Excellence. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 11 minutes.

Annotation: This brief overview outlines 10 steps to successful strategic planning, describes why it is important, and gives examples from the field and guiding resources.

Developing Evidence About Public Health Services. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Presenter(s): Betty Bekemeier, PhD, MPH, FAAN. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: In this one-hour webinar, which is part of the Hot Topics series, Betty Bekemeier, PhD, MPH, FAAN, reviews the importance of collecting standardized data and demonstrates how the information is being used to make the case for public health services. The intended audience is local, state, and tribal public health professionals; Program staff and managers working in environmental health and communicable disease prevention. A recording, slides, and a slides handout are available.

Learning Objectives: • Describe ways in which local health department administrative data can be used to demonstrate the value of public health services. • Describe the need for and value of standardized public health services data for public health performance, advocacy, and building evidence. • Describe opportunities for filling critical gaps in local public health services data.

Special Instructions: NWCPHP trainings are accessed through PH LearnLink.

Adaptive Leadership and Public Health. Year Developed: 2015. Source: National Association of County and City Health Officials. Presenter(s): N/A. Type: Video. Level: Intermediate. Length: 5 minutes.

Annotation: Local health officials and their staff are exploring innovative partnerships with other agencies in health care and beyond and identifying new ways of operating within and influencing the economic and social conditions of our health system. Such work demands a new kind of leadership – a transition from our typical spheres of influence and authority to mobilizing people to tackle tough challenges and thrive. Adaptive Leadership is a practical framework for leading consequential change in the midst of significant market and sociopolitical transformation.

Systems Integration Training Spotlight. Year Developed: 2014. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): Beth DeFrancis, MLS; Keisha Watson-Bah, PhD; John Richards, MA. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: Series, various lengths.

Annotation: This training spotlight, developed by the MCH Navigator, provides links to selected trainings and related tools on the topics of systems integration, integrated services, and systems development. It addresses a priority focus of the National MCH Workforce Development Center. At the heart of systems integration lies systems thinking, a discipline for seeing wholes, interrelationships and patterns of change. By focusing on the interrelationships among key elements within a system, and the influence of these interrelationships on the system’s behavior over time, leaders implementing improvements can pursue several goals at once, simultaneously reducing the potential for unintended consequences by predicting upstream and downstream influences and effects. By coordinating efforts across systems of care, programs to improve maternal and child health (MCH) can increase coverage and reduce barriers to the use of services and supports. Linking medical and non-medical sectors (to encompass education, housing, social services, mental health, and early childhood systems) can help minimize risk factors and promote health and wellness across the life course.

From Data to Desk: Translating Needs Assessments into Targeted Employee Training. Year Developed: 2013. Source: Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Presenter(s): Luann D’Ambrosio, MEd, Tina Abbott, MSW, Cindy Gleason, BS. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar for local, state, and tribal public health leaders and managers shares tips for assessing staff training needs and implementing training plans.

Learning Objectives: • Describe the benefits of completing a training needs assessment Identify different ways to collect data for use in workforce development • Describe how a targeted training needs assessment can benefit program planning • Recognize the potential for a workforce development plan, beyond meeting accreditation requirements

Special Instructions: NWCPHP trainings are accessed through PH LearnLink. See https://www.nwcphp.org/training/tools-resources/ph-learnlink

« Previous Next »

New Search View My Citations

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $225,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.