Edit Your Search

Level:

Accessible:

Continuing Education:


New Search

Search Results

Search Results

Displaying records 1 through 10 of 12 found.

Measuring Family Engagement in MCH Research: Opportunities and Challenges. Year Developed: 2018. Source: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Office of Epidemiology and Research. Presenter(s): Christina Bethell, PhD, MBA, MPH; Clarissa Hoover, MPH. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 57 minutes.

Annotation: The MCH community has a long-standing tradition of integrating family engagement into programs, research, and practice. Yet, tested and validated measures to improve and sustain the quality of family engagement in health services and research are lacking.

Learning Objectives: • Understand currently available measures of family engagement. • Identify gaps in developing and utilizing these measures. • Learn innovative strategies for engaging families in research.

From Chaos to Collaboration: Discovering Consensus Among Competing Interests. Year Developed: 2018. Source: National Conference of State Legislatures. Presenter(s): Larry Schooler. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: 50 minutes.

Annotation: Legislators and staff are often faced with the challenge of making decisions, or helping to make decisions, that satisfies diverse constituencies with competing interests. In this webinar, participants learned about both the art and science behind finding consensus to address challenging public policy issues by exploring effective methods and proven techniques that produce agreement to policy challenges. Participants received with new tools and skills for creating consensus among diverse interest groups.

Using Social Determinants of Health to Inform Fatality Review. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Center for Fatality Review and Prevention. Presenter(s): Madelyn Reyes, MA, MPA, RN, Jola Crear-Perry, MD, FACOG, Susan Hurtado. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Social determinants of health are conditions in the environments in which people are born, live, learn, work, play, worship, and age that affect a wide range of health, functioning, and quality-of-life outcomes and risks. Child Death Review (CDR) and Fetal and Infant Mortality Review (FIMR) programs work to understand health care systems and social problems that contribute to fetal, infant, and child deaths and to identify and implement systems improvement and interventions to improve the lives of some of our most vulnerable women, infants, children, and families. Keeping a Social Determinants of Health lens while conducting fatality review is a step toward reducing inequities in these vital health outcomes.

Special Instructions: Password: sdoh

Improving Systems of Care for Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs and Autism Spectrum Disorder. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Conference of State Legislatures. Presenter(s): Tahra Johnson; Michelle Jarvis; Shawna Wright; Thomas Holmes; Susan Lontine. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 58 minutes.

Annotation: Children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN) are defined as children who have or are at increased risk for a chronic physical, developmental, behavioral, or emotional condition and who also require health and related services of a type or amount beyond that required by children generally. For this population of children, there are often barriers to accessing treatment from a shortage of providers to lack of coverage. This webinar explores barriers to accessing care and discusses strategies that states can implement to improve systems of care for Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs (CYSHCN) and those with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

Evaluation Learning Bundle. Year Developed: 2017. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): Keisha Watson, PhD; John Richards, MA, AITP. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This learning bundle uses the CDC framework as a conceptual model to organize learning opportunities. It presents introductions to the six steps of program evaluation in short video podcasts. You can also download materials from the CDC about each step. After reviewing the introductory material, you can access additional learning opportunities to gain knowledge and skills related to each step of the framework. For additional resources this learning bundle also includes an Evaluation Toolkit developed by NCEMCH that includes an evaluation primer, a collection of key resources, and an interactive Choose-and-Use tool to assist users in finding instructions on how to conduct evaluations and examples of successful evaluations from the field.

Crafting Richer Public Health Messages: Messaging and the 5 Essential Public Health Law Services. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Network for Public Health Law. Presenter(s): Scott Burris; Doug Blanke; Benjamin D. Winig. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: The 2016 Five Essential Public Health Law Services framework reflects the key scientific, legal, and advocacy activities necessary to support the timely adoption and diffusion of effective public health legal and policy interventions. The services are not all purely legal, nor are they provided only by lawyers. Instead, researchers and scientists, government officials and practitioners, and business, community, faith, and other leaders may all be involved in any given activity. The Five Essential Public Health Law Services were developed from and based upon public health law success stories, like that of tobacco control. In this webinar, the presenters explain their research over the past year exploring how this framework can be employed to more successfully advance public health law initiatives, with specific focus on preemption, housing code enforcement, and early childhood care and education. Presenters also discuss how the messaging used to advance public health laws, when crafted in a way that embraces the full range of intuitive moral values, may lead to broader community and political support for successfully developing, enacting and then enforcing new legal solutions.

Special Instructions: Slides and videos for all three parts of this series are available on the series link.

Continuing Education: Individuals may qualify for CLE credit. ASLME is an approved provider of continuing legal education credits in several states ASLME will also apply for CLE credits in other states upon request.

Crafting Richer Public Health Messages: Lessons and Examples for State and Local Advocacy. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Network for Public Health Law. Presenter(s): Sue Lynn Ledford, DrPH, MPA, BSN, RN; Alisahah Cole, MD; Gary Gunderson, DMin, DDiv. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: In turbulent political times, crafting public health messages that resonate across differing political ideologies is more important and challenging than ever. In this webinar, the presenters offer practical examples of how public health issues have been effectively communicated across party lines in the politically divided state of North Carolina through the application of Moral Foundations Theory. Examples include successfully advocating for sterile needle exchange, invoking community loyalty to support healthcare system collaborations using GIS mapping, and developing partnerships with faith communities to promote health. Based on these examples and a wealth of experience, the presenters will provide public health practitioners and advocates with tools, advice and strategies to assist them in looking deeper into distressed communities to understand the community’s values, needs, and complexity, and to focus locally to design solutions alongside diverse coalitions that may include faith networks, law enforcement, healthcare providers, and other (sometimes unexpected) stakeholders.

Special Instructions: Slides and videos for all three parts of this series are available on the series link.

Continuing Education: Individuals may qualify for CLE credit. ASLME is an approved provider of continuing legal education credits in several states ASLME will also apply for CLE credits in other states upon request.

Crafting Richer Public Health Messages using Moral Foundations Theory. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Network for Public Health Law. Presenter(s): Gene Matthews; Scott Burris. Type: Webinar. Level: Advanced. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: Effective messaging of public health challenges and interventions is essential to public health practice and especially to implementing public health laws and policies in a polarized political environment. It is easy for public health leaders to become consumed with the ongoing political and resource shifts taking place in public health and health care. However, it is also clear that those in public health, at all levels, want to engage more deeply and meaningfully with communities of all backgrounds who are burdened by poor health. Using Moral Foundations Theory, the speakers explain how liberals and conservative audiences resonate differently to six intuitive foundational moral values. This session explores crafting messages that embrace all six foundational values so that public health practitioners may engage a broader base of support and develop new community partnerships.

Special Instructions: Slides and videos for all three parts of this series are available on the series link.

Continuing Education: Individuals may qualify for CLE credit. ASLME is an approved provider of continuing legal education credits in several states ASLME will also apply for CLE credits in other states upon request.

Data-Driven Leadership: Lead with Data-Driven Decisions and Predictive Analytics. Year Developed: 2016. Source: GovLoop. Presenter(s): Alan S. Berson. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Introductory. Length: 20 minutes.

Annotation: Leading with the cold hard facts can be a reassuring method to know you’re making the best decisions for your organization. But this can be challenging at times when you have to discern between “good” data and “bad” data. Harnessing methods for data analysis is easier said than done, but it can make all the difference in leading your organization. This course is led by Dr. Henry Thibodeaux, Assessment and Evaluations Leader in the Office of Personnel Management, and Allen Schweyer, Executive Director of Talent Management and Leadership University. The course comprises an overview and introduction, 5 lessons, and a post-course survey.

Learning Objectives: • Discern the difference between correlation and causation. • Understand the importance of framing data analysis with precise questions and objectives. • Learn to distinguish “good” data from “bad” data. • Gain familiarity with several common data analysis techniques and where they should be used.

Continuing Education: GovLoop is registered with the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA) as a sponsor of continuing professional education on the National Registry of CPE Sponsors.

Adaptive Leadership and Public Health. Year Developed: 2015. Source: National Association of County and City Health Officials. Presenter(s): N/A. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 5 minutes.

Annotation: Local health officials and their staff are exploring innovative partnerships with other agencies in health care and beyond and identifying new ways of operating within and influencing the economic and social conditions of our health system. Such work demands a new kind of leadership – a transition from our typical spheres of influence and authority to mobilizing people to tackle tough challenges and thrive. Adaptive Leadership is a practical framework for leading consequential change in the midst of significant market and sociopolitical transformation.

Next »

New Search View My Citations

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.