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Displaying records 11 through 20 of 81 found.

Dissemination and Implementation Science: What is it and Why is it Critical to Translational Science? . Year Developed: 2018. Source: Clinical Directors Network. Presenter(s): Enola Proctor, PhD, MSW; Stephen Bartels, MD, MS; Laura-Mae Baldwin, MD, MPH. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 56 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar presents the 'why' and 'what' of dissemination and implementation science. Speakers also address reversing health disparities in complex health conditions through implementation science.

Learning Objectives: • Know what dissemination, implementation, implementation science, and dissemination science are. • Understand the features of Dissemination and Implementation (D&I) research studies, and what makes D&I research studies different from usual clinical trials . • Be able to identify funding sources for D&I research.

Special Instructions: Must enter email address to view webinar.

Where To Find MCH Resources: An Introduction. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health. Presenter(s): Keisha Watson and John Richards. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Introductory. Length: 18 minutes.

Annotation: This short presentation discusses the information needs of MCH professionals and identifies distinct online resources to address those needs, from pop and professional sources such as Google, PubMed, and Wikipedia to grant-supported resources that address MCHB topical programs and initiatives. Topics include data warehouses, research centers, epidemiology sites, professional and membership organizations

Learning Objectives: • Identify information needs of professionals • Explain the differences between types of online resources • Differentiate between trusted and questionable online resources • Understand where to go to find additional resources

Integrating Early Childhood Data. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Conference of State Legislatures. Presenter(s): Elizabeth Dabney, Carlise King. Type: n.a.. Level: Introductory. Length: 52 minutes.

Annotation: Data from both the early childhood and K–12 sectors can help policymakers inform policy discussions and funding decisions; chart the progress of children, programs, and the state; strengthen and support the early childhood workforce; and pinpoint best practices and areas of need. Linking limited, but critical, early childhood and K–12 data can help states know whether policies and programs successfully transition children from early childhood to the classroom and get them ready for school. During the webinar hear from the Early Childhood Data Collaborative and Data Quality Campaign about how state legislators and policymakers can support the linkage and use of early childhood and K-12 data to inform policy and improve child outcomes.

From Problem to Prevention: Evidence-Based Public Health. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Greater Midwest Region. Presenter(s): Derek Johnson, MLIS. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This introductory webinar provides attendees with a basic definition and framework for evidence-based public health. Special attention is paid to three of the seven steps: Community Assessment, Determining What is Known in the Literature, and Evaluating the Program or Policy. Free resources are presented that can assist practitioners with these specific steps of the evidence-based public health framework.

Learning Objectives: • Define and describe evidence-based public health. • Identify a public health need and formulate an answerable question. • Locate and search applicable literature and resources. • Understand the importance of evaluation and locate helpful resources.

Special Instructions: Registration required before accessing this course.

CPH Study Session Webinar: Biostatistics. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Board of Public Health Examiners. Presenter(s): Lisa Sullivan, PhD. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 180 minutes. Slides

Annotation: This course presents a detailed overview of biostatistics, terminology and definitions, and practice questions. It includes how data can be displayed and hypothesis testing procedures.

Learning Objectives: • Summarize a sample selected from a population. • Make inferences about population parameters based on sample statistics.

Staying Ahead of the Curve: Modeling and Public Health Decision-Making. Year Developed: 2016. Source: Centers for Disease Control-Public Health Grand Rounds. Presenter(s): Richard Hatchett, MD; Daniel Jernigan, MD; Martin Meltzer, PhD; Lauren Ancel Meyers, PhD . Type: Video. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Where are infections spreading? How many people will be affected? What are some different ways to stop the spread of an epidemic? In a process known as modeling, scientists analyze data using complex mathematical methods to provide answers to these and other questions during an emergency response. Models provide the foresight that can help decision makers better prepare for the future.

Learning Objectives:

Introduction to Instrumental Variables Based Methods for Causal Inference in Health Research. Year Developed: 2016. Source: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Office of Epidemiology and Research. Presenter(s): Maria Glymour, PhD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar presents an in-depth analysis of instrumental variables (IV) based methods for inference in public health research. Topics such as the motivation and intuition of instrumental variables analysis, how to define IV, IV assumptions, interpretation of the IV effect estimate and IV assumption violations are addressed.

Learning Objectives: • Understand the situations in which instrumental variables can be useful in health research • Describe the assumptions and interpretations for instrumental variables based effect estimates • Learn examples of instrumental variables used in health research, including policy differences, genetic variants, and other examples • Learn basic concepts for implementing instrumental variables analyses and understand whether the methods are feasible in your research setting

Disparities in the Health and Well-Being of Children and Youth in Rural Areas of the United States. Year Developed: 2016. Source: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Presenter(s): Janice Probst, PhD; Alana Knudson, PhD; Steve Holve, MD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: A presentation of recent data from national surveys and data sets on access, health status, and mortality patterns for children and youth in rural areas, along with resources and information on improving the health of these populations.

Special Instructions: DataSpeak uses a number of different technologies. To get the most out of the information, please review the technical requirements at http://hrsa.gov/archive/mchb/dataspeak/techreq/index.html

Vitally Important: Improving the Timeliness of Vital Statistics to Advance MCH. Year Developed: 2015. Source: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Presenter(s): Patricia W. Potrzebowski, PhD; Glenn Copeland, MBA; John Paulson. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: n.a.. Presentation Slides

Annotation: This presentation focuses on how states are working to improve vital statistics timeliness and data sharing, and how this is helping to inform and improve programs and health outcomes for women and infants. Topics include the importance and need for improving timeliness of vital records data; efforts underway to make vital statistics more current and thus more useful for public health program purposes; work being done to provide more timely data on infant mortality in Michigan in order to better inform programs working to improve outcomes, with a focus on the Collaborative Improvement & Innovation Network (COIIN) to Reduce Infant Mortality; and how Ohio compiles, augments, and uses the data in its public health data warehouse with a focus on using the State and Territorial Exchange of Vital Events (STEVE) System. Vital statistics—the data and health indicators collected from vital records on births and deaths—are an important source of data for answering national and state health questions. Birth and death records allow states to track maternal, fetal, and infant mortality, adverse birth outcomes, delivery characteristics, and maternal risk factors, among other statistics. Improving the timeliness of these records is essential to making sure they are most useful for monitoring and advancing public health efforts in real time.

Special Instructions: Webinar recorded using Adobe Connect. Post-Webinar Q&As (PDF – 129 KB): https://mchb.hrsa.gov/sites/default/files/mchb/MaternalChildHealthInitiatives/dataspeak/april2015qas.pdf Transcript (PDF – 254 KB): https://mchb.hrsa.gov/sites/default/files/mchb/MaternalChildHealthInitiatives/dataspeak/april2015transcript.pdf

Using Process Flow Diagramming To Understand and Improve MCH Systems and Position Title V for Health Care Reform. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Presenter(s): Amanda Cornett, MPH; Kori Flower, MS, MD, MPH; Kristen Hassmiller Lich, MHA, PhD; Sue Ewy, MS. Type: Video. Level: Intermediate. Length: 98 minutes.

Annotation: This interactive, hands‐on workshop provides background on process flow diagramming, features a presentation by a state from the National MCH Workforce Development Center cohort, and gives participants an opportunity to practice process flow diagramming using a simulated MCH process. Participants leave with a plan to apply this tool to MCH processes in their state/territory. To lead in health care reform, Title V agencies need enhanced training and tools for understanding complex processes. The National MCH Workforce Development Center (WDC) at UNC Chapel Hill has partnered with MCHB and AMCHP to offer intensive training to state and territorial Title V leaders. In the first WDC cohort, process flow diagramming has been a powerful tool for identifying areas for reducing redundancy and eliminating gaps in services.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $225,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.