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Displaying records 1 through 6 of 6 found.

Bloom's Taxonomy: Why, How, & Top Examples. Year Developed: 2017. Source: n.a.. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 4 minutes.

Annotation: This video provides a brief introduction to Bloom's taxonomy of learning in the cognitive domain. It outlines the levels of the taxonomy including remembering, understanding, applying,analyzing, evaluating, and creating. It is designed for classroom educators. Bloom's taxonomy is a set of three hierarchical models used to classify educational learning objectives into levels of complexity and specificity. The three lists cover the learning objectives in cognitive, affective and sensory domains. The cognitive domain list has been the primary focus of most traditional education and is frequently used to structure curriculum learning objectives, assessments and activities.

Foundations of Critical Thinking. Year Developed: 2012. Source: CityMatCH. Presenter(s): Enoch Hale, PhD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 35 minutes.

Annotation: Dr. Hale begins this webinar by discussing what critical thinking is, its importance and how it can be applied to professionals’ everyday work. The presentation focuses on the principles of critical thinking and the underlying preferences and beliefs we have that influence our thoughts and actions. He provides various definitions and a model for fostering a critical mind called SEEI: stating words, elaborating statements, exemplifying concepts, and illustrating an idea. The importance of creating a language of thinking is also addressed, as well as clarifying purpose, identifying assumptions, and formulating questions.

Learning Objectives: •Define critical thinking. •Describe why critical thinking is important. •Learn strategies to improve critical thinking.

Decision Making: A Systematic and Organized Approach. Year Developed: 2011. Source: South Central Public Health Partnership. Presenter(s): Peter M. Ginter, PhD. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Introductory. Length: 120 minutes. Troubleshooting Tips for South Central Public Health Partnership Courses

Annotation: This course discusses the nature of qualitative decision making and provides a rationale for developing and using a systematic and structured approach to it. The presenter explains the fundamental steps in qualitative decision making and provides a method for structuring each step of the decision making process. He also stresses how decision makers need to adopt a structured decision making process to identifying alternative course of action. The course provides examples of how to use said structured process.

Learning Objectives: •To discuss the nature of qualitative decision making. •To provide rationale for developing and using a systematic and structured approach for qualitative decision making. •To identify and explain the fundamental steps in qualitative decision making •To provide a method for structuring each step of the decision making process. •To demonstrate a structured qualitative decision making approach.

Special Instructions: Registration to the South Central Public Health Partnership is required. For new users it will take one weekday to receive an access email. If you are registered in TRAIN, login using that username and password. Click on “Course Offerings” and search for “Decision Making: A Systematic and Organized Approach.”

Critical Thinking for Public Health Practice. Year Developed: 2006. Source: Upper Midwest Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This course is for public health leaders who may need to solve a problem or crisis by thinking critically about it and make appropriate decisions using an established six step model.

Learning Objectives: • Identify and clearly define a problem situation. • Gather facts about a problem situation in an efficient and effective manner. • Identify and categorize any constraints on possible solutions to a problem situation. • Employ an appropriate method to effectively generate alternative solutions to a problem situation. • Use a set of criteria (feasibility, suitability, and flexibility) to evaluate alternative solutions to a problem situation. • Develop an action plan for implementing a solution to a problem situation. • Monitor progress after implementing a solution to a problem situation to evaluate whether or not objectives are met.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Introduction to Biostatistics 2: Variables. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Susan Telke. Type: Interactive Modules. Level: Introductory. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: In this module learners will be oriented to some types of variables and their roles in basic biostatistics. Different types of quantitative and qualitative variables will be explored. Basic graphs and charts depicting these variables will also be discussed.

Continuing Education: 0.1 CEU

Finding and Evaluating Health Information on the Internet. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: Upper Midwest Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): Christopher Childs, MS. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: The University of Iowa College of Public Health Upper Midwest Public Health Training Center, in cooperation with the Iowa Counties Public Health Association (ICPHA), has developed a practiced-based education course targeted toward new public health administrators and nursing administrators. The course is part of the UMPHTC’s continuing effort to provide training to strengthen the skills and knowledge of the current public health workforce. Topics discussed include how to enhance searching, and utilize databases for finding health information.

Learning Objectives: • Evaluate health information on the Internet using standard criteria. • Explain how to enhance searching in electronic resources. • Locate public health information resources on the Internet. • Identify regional and national public health training opportunities.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.