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Learning Opportunities for the Title V Workforce in Communities and at the Local Level Training Brief. Year Developed: Unknown. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This training brief focuses on those skills needed in communities as identified by CityMatCH's Strategic Work Plan. It covers collaboration and partnerships; evaluation; health equity and social justice for improved family and community health; use of data strategically for the transformation of family and community health; engaging and strengthening MCH leaders; and community health centers.

Ethics and Professionalism Moral Distress Series Part II: The Role of Courage and Culture. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Department of Veterans Affairs, Employee Education System and National Center for Ethics in Health Care. Presenter(s): Lisa Lehmann. Type: Webinar. Level: Advanced. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: The purpose of this knowledge-based recorded webinar, The Role of Courage and Culture, is to describe how trouble speaking up can lead to moral distress and present two potential methods to alleviate this issue: cultivating moral courage and improving organizational culture. Dr. Lisa S. Lehmann will explain why health care providers often had trouble in voicing moral and ethical concerns and how this can lead to moral distress. She will describe research which shows that cultivating moral courage can encourage employees to speak up about professionalism and patient safety concerns. She will also describe how efforts to improve organizational culture can foster ethical leadership, psychological safety and greater interprofessional teamwork, which in turn can reduce moral distress. This training will expand upon the work presented in the first session of this series, giving employees and leaders across VA concrete tools to address moral distress in their local settings. There is a post-test and evaluation after completing the course.

Learning Objectives: • Define moral distress. • Identify the relationship between moral courage and speaking up. • Describe the role of moral courage in reducing moral distress.

Special Instructions: Registration required to access this course.

Continuing Education: See course listing for CE details.

Public Health Ethics Training Series. Year Developed: 2014. Source: North Carolina Institute for Public Health. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: The "Public Health Ethics" training series is designed to promote the ethical practice of public health by teaching about the ethical principles of public health and by providing resources for creating an ethical climate in public health agencies and schools of public health. This 8 Module series includes the following topics: • 1-Distinguishing Public Health Ethics from Medical Ethics • 2-Values and Beliefs Inherent to a Public Health Perspective • 3-The Public Health Code of Ethics • 4-Law and Ethics in Public Health • 5-Pandemic Influenza: A Justice Case Study • 6-Decision-making in Public Health Ethics • 7-Barriers to the Ethical Practice of Public Health • 8-Responding to Unethical Events

Learning Objectives: Module 1--Distinguishing Public Health Ethics from Medical Ethics • Describe the common practice settings from which medical ethics and public health ethics emerge. • Explain “the tyranny of the majority”. • Explain why the medical ethics principle of autonomy does not work as well in public health. Module 2--Values and Beliefs Inherent to a Public Health Perspective • Explain how a given value or belief from the list is important to public health. Module 3--The Public Health Code of Ethics • Describe how an aspirational code can guide an ethical discussion. • Describe a situation where a given ethical principle applies in public health. • Identify means of creating an ethical environment within public health organizations. Module 4--Law and Ethics in Public Health • Describe three of the several legal powers given to public health. • Describe an ethical principle in public health that is not encoded in public health law. • Describe how the exercise of any power is an ethical issue. Module 5--Pandemic Influenza: A Justice Case Study • Provide examples of how concepts of justice are applied to anticipated responses in an influenza pandemic. Module 6--Decision-making in Public Health Ethics • Describe how to recognize an ethical issue. • Describe the elements of a fair process. • Describe the steps of ethical decision-making in a group. Module 7--Barriers to the Ethical Practice of Public Health • Identify the facets of human nature and our social environment that are particularly relevant in leading to unethical behaviors in public health. Module 8--Responding to Unethical Events • Describe the range of possible responses to an event that is clearly unethical.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account.

Continuing Education: 0.92 Certificate of Attendance

Bridging Gaps: The Vital Role of Cultural Competence in Healthcare. Year Developed: 2014. Source: University at Albany School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Wilma Alvarado-Little, M.A., M.S.W. and James O’Barr, M.S.W.. Type: Video. Level: Advanced Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Health disparities have been identified among racial and ethnic minorities within the United States. These disparities have been linked to health beliefs and behaviors, access to care, and quality of health care services. Cultural competency is one area in healthcare training that addresses health disparities by creating awareness of sociocultural and racial bias among medical and public health professionals. Jeannette South-Paul and Robert Like have stated in, Cultural Competence for the Health Workforce, "Evidence of cultural (racial, ethnic, and religious, among other determinants) discordance between health care providers and the populations they serve suggests that every member of the health workforce must understand and implement culturally competent care as the foundation for improving the quality of services delivered". Bridging Gaps: The Vital Role of Cultural Competence in Healthcare presents fundamental concepts on cultural and linguistic competence for medical and public health professionals. This webcast demonstrates why cultural and linguistic competence is important and how it can facilitate dialogue, awareness, and learning to address diverse healthcare needs. This webcast is part of the training series “Advancing Cultural Competence in the Public Health and Health Care Workforce”. More information can be found at www.advancingcc.org.

Learning Objectives: • Recognize the benefits of culturally and linguistically appropriate health services. • Describe methods for providing culturally and linguistically appropriate health services. • Explain why providing culturally competent care is essential to improving overall individual and population-based health outcomes.

A Master Class in Public Health Ethics. Year Developed: 2014. Source: National Association of County and City Health Officials. Presenter(s): Drue Barrett, Ph.D.; Alan Melnick, M.D., M.P.H., C.P.H.; Leonard Ortmann, Ph.D.; Matthew Stefanak, M.P.H.; Karyn Clark, M.A.; Jane Wernsman, R.N., B.S.N.; Linda Doerge, M.P.A.. Type: Archived Webinar. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: 74 minutes.

Annotation: The webinar highlights a set of recommendations designed to help local health departments (LHDs) build a formal infrastructure for addressing ethical issues. Guest speakers from two LHDs also share examples of ethical challenges they face, and a panel of public health ethics experts provides technical assistance.

Leadership and Advocacy: Trends and Challenges in Maternal and Child Health. Year Developed: 2011. Source: South Central Public Health Partnership. Presenter(s): Michael Fraser, PhD. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Introductory. Length: Self-paced. Troubleshooting Tips for South Central Public Health Partnership Courses

Annotation: In 1935, Title V of the Social Security Act established a federal-state partnership to address the needs of the maternal and child health population. Over the years, though changes have occurred, Title V remains the oldest federal program dedicated to the health of all mothers and children. Strong leadership and advocacy skills are critical to the program’s success. Program faculty discussed national trends in maternal and child health, national leadership for MCH, current challenges and opportunities, and future directions. *NOTE: This course was originally delivered as a satellite broadcast.

Learning Objectives: • Describe maternal and child health leadership and current challenges and opportunities. • Discuss leadership and the importance of advocacy. • Present applications of maternal and child leadership in current practice settings. • Provide ideas and suggestions for future directions of Title V Maternal and Child Health Programs in light of the Affordable Care Act.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: Certificate of Attendance; CEUs: Nursing 1.5 hours, Social Work 1.5 hours

Introduction to Ethical Frameworks for Public Health Emergencies and Disasters. Year Developed: 2010. Source: University of Minnesota Center for Public Health Preparedness. Presenter(s): Lisa Pogoff, MPH, MSW; Susan Larson, MPH, RN. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 120 minutes.

Annotation: The discusses the application of public health frameworks in emergency situations. Specific challenges and issues in disasters using ethical standards are discussed and interactive questions help guide the learner. The demands in emergencies on health care workers and different methods to allocate resources, as well as worker’s communication with the public, are additionally covered.

Learning Objectives: •Define what behaviors are morally acceptable. •Specify how people should act in various situations. •Reflect historical/cultural values and principles.

Special Instructions: Registration to the University of Minnesota School of Public Health is required. If direct link doesn't work, see their main menu under URL2 field and scroll down to "Introduction to Ethical Frameworks for Public Health Emergencies and Disasters."

Continuing Education: 1 Continuing Education Hour . A post test and certificate are available upon completion.

Facing Ethical Challenges; Dealing with Outcomes: Stories from the Field. Year Developed: 2009. Source: Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Presenter(s): Harvey Kayman, MD, MPH. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 40 minutes.

Annotation: With an intended audience of local and state public health workers, this presentation draws on stories from public health professionals of scenarios demonstrating ethical dilemmas they’ve encountered. Participation from audience members centered on how they think a given struggle should be resolved makes this an interactive webinar. Dr. Kayman discusses the differences in biomedical and public health ethics and frames his discussion around beneficence and justice. A protocol plan that public health professionals might use to guide decision-making during crises also is presented. Slides and handouts area available for use.

Learning Objectives: • List and describe public health ethical principles and an ethical framework to resolve moral tensions disasters might bring up. • Explain how the scenarios presented illustrate how the framework and principles can be used. • Develop methods to make decisions with collaborators in the midst of a disaster.

Special Instructions: To access the presentation, scroll to the bottom of the landing page and click “Play Recording.”

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.