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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 13 found.

Learning Opportunities for the Title V Workforce in Communities and at the Local Level Training Brief. Year Developed: Unknown. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This training brief focuses on those skills needed in communities as identified by CityMatCH's Strategic Work Plan. It covers collaboration and partnerships; evaluation; health equity and social justice for improved family and community health; use of data strategically for the transformation of family and community health; engaging and strengthening MCH leaders; and community health centers.

Strengthening Skills For Health Equity: Pennsylvania's Health Equity Committee. Year Developed: 2021. Source: National MCH Workforce Development Center. Presenter(s): Syrai Harrel, MSHE, PHPA and Aerielle Waters, MPH, PHPA. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 20 minutes.

Annotation: This video describes Pennsylvania's Title V equity work as part of the National MCH Workforce Development Center's Strengthening Skills for Health Equity Skills Institute held remotely in March 2021. Pennsylvania has developed a Health Equity Committee to increase Title V's capacity to achieve health equity in the design, development, and implementation of public health programs, services, and systems. This committee encourages training, buy-in, tools for technical assistance and a health equity plan.

Strengthening Skills For Health Equity: Oregon Title V. Year Developed: 2021. Source: National MCH Workforce Development Center. Presenter(s): Nurit Fischler. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 20 minutes.

Annotation: This video describes Oregon's MCAH Title V equity work as part of the National MCH Workforce Development Center's Strengthening Skills for Health Equity Skills Institute held remotely in March 2021. Ms. Fischler describes the Oregon Strategic Goal to eliminate health disparities by 2030 through public health modernization, a state health improvement plan, their governor's racial justice task force, current legislation to declare racism as a public health crisis, and a commitment to address inequities made more visible through the COVID-19 pandemic.

Strengthening Skills For Health Equity: Louisiana Title V. Year Developed: 2021. Source: National MCH Workforce Development Center. Presenter(s): Gloria Grady, MPH. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 20 minutes.

Annotation: This video describes Louisiana's Title V equity work as part of the National MCH Workforce Development Center's Strengthening Skills for Health Equity Skills Institute held remotely in March 2021. Louisiana follows a learning/testing/growing model where they: (1) learn through training and consultation with experts about health equity; (2) test through development of a health equity action team and action plan; and (3) grow through ongoing conversations on racial justice with staff, families, and community advocates.

Getting Our House in Order: Addressing Internal Racial Equity. Year Developed: 2019. Source: CityMatch. Presenter(s): Jessica Ehule; Ann Novias; Janet Jones;. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 91 minutes.

Annotation: The desire to achieve equity drives the reason why many of us work in the field of maternal and child health. Racial inequities are evident in health outcomes across the board. In addressing these disparities, organizations often neglect to assess how they may be contributing to the racial inequities we work so hard to eliminate. We are working within a system founded on principles to advance specific groups of people, while leaving others behind. This foundation has led to biases being present in our policies, procedures, and day-to-day interactions. The webinar features CityMatCH members Janet Jones of the Waco-McLennan County Public Health District, Ana Novais of the Rhode Island Department of Health, and Jessica Ehule, CityMatCH staff member. Join CityMatCH’s Equity Action group and CityLeaders Cohort 12 as we discuss the strategies used by these agencies to actualize racial equity with discussion about how leaders can be impactful in this work.

A Conversation on Ethical Considerations for a Fair and Effective Health Care System. Year Developed: 2018. Source: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health. Presenter(s): Chris Feudtner, MD, PhD, MPH; Grace Oei, MD, MA; Chaplain Mark Bartel, M Div, SCC. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 59 minutes.

Annotation: What ethical considerations should guide the design and evaluation of systems of care for children with medical complexity? There are inevitable tradeoffs that any complex health care system must confront when attempting to achieve multiple worthy goals, from benefitting individual patients and families and securing fair distribution of benefits across populations, to operating in a manner that is transparent and free from conflicts of interest. Discussing the article, Ethical Framework for Risk Stratification and Mitigation Programs for Children with Medical Complexity, the panel shared recommendations that help ensure programs for children with medical complexity avoid potentially ethically problematic situations and practices. A video and presentation slides are available.

Unconscious Bias: Do I Have the Tools to Recognize It and Speak Up?. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Region IV Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): Leonie Gordon, MD. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: Unconscious bias refers to the biases we hold that are not in our conscious control. Research shows that these biases can adversely affect key decisions in the workplace. The session enables you to work towards reducing the effects of unconscious bias for yourself and within your organization. Using examples that you will be able to relate to, we help you to explore the link between implicit bias and the impact on the organization. The overall aim of the session is to provide participants with an understanding of the nature of Unconscious Bias and how it impacts on individual and group attitudes, behaviors and decision-making processes.

Learning Objectives: • Explain the source and function of unconscious bias. • Discuss how unconscious bias impacts on decision-making and relationships in the organization. • Develop strategies and techniques for reducing personal unconscious bias, as well as the unconscious bias that manifests in teams and across the organization. • Develop a strategy for individual action.

Ethics and Professionalism Moral Distress Series Part II: The Role of Courage and Culture. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Department of Veterans Affairs, Employee Education System and National Center for Ethics in Health Care. Presenter(s): Lisa Lehmann. Type: Webinar. Level: Advanced. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: The purpose of this knowledge-based recorded webinar, The Role of Courage and Culture, is to describe how trouble speaking up can lead to moral distress and present two potential methods to alleviate this issue: cultivating moral courage and improving organizational culture. Dr. Lisa S. Lehmann will explain why health care providers often had trouble in voicing moral and ethical concerns and how this can lead to moral distress. She will describe research which shows that cultivating moral courage can encourage employees to speak up about professionalism and patient safety concerns. She will also describe how efforts to improve organizational culture can foster ethical leadership, psychological safety and greater interprofessional teamwork, which in turn can reduce moral distress. This training will expand upon the work presented in the first session of this series, giving employees and leaders across VA concrete tools to address moral distress in their local settings. There is a post-test and evaluation after completing the course.

Learning Objectives: • Define moral distress. • Identify the relationship between moral courage and speaking up. • Describe the role of moral courage in reducing moral distress.

Special Instructions: Registration required to access this course.

Continuing Education: See course listing for CE details.

How Ethics Serves Public Health. Year Developed: 2014. Source: National Science Board. Presenter(s): Arthur Caplan. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 10 minutes.

Annotation: Using the problem of low rates of flu vaccinations as a case study, Arthur Caplan tells how bioethics can change behaviors. Caplan is the 2014 individual recipient of the National Science Board’s prestigious Public Service Award, recognizing his leadership and successful initiatives in the field of bioethics.

Bridging Gaps: The Vital Role of Cultural Competence in Healthcare. Year Developed: 2014. Source: University at Albany School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Wilma Alvarado-Little, M.A., M.S.W. and James O’Barr, M.S.W.. Type: Video. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Health disparities have been identified among racial and ethnic minorities within the United States. These disparities have been linked to health beliefs and behaviors, access to care, and quality of health care services. Cultural competency is one area in healthcare training that addresses health disparities by creating awareness of sociocultural and racial bias among medical and public health professionals. Jeannette South-Paul and Robert Like have stated in, Cultural Competence for the Health Workforce, "Evidence of cultural (racial, ethnic, and religious, among other determinants) discordance between health care providers and the populations they serve suggests that every member of the health workforce must understand and implement culturally competent care as the foundation for improving the quality of services delivered". Bridging Gaps: The Vital Role of Cultural Competence in Healthcare presents fundamental concepts on cultural and linguistic competence for medical and public health professionals. This webcast demonstrates why cultural and linguistic competence is important and how it can facilitate dialogue, awareness, and learning to address diverse healthcare needs. This webcast is part of the training series “Advancing Cultural Competence in the Public Health and Health Care Workforce”. More information can be found at www.advancingcc.org.

Learning Objectives: • Recognize the benefits of culturally and linguistically appropriate health services. • Describe methods for providing culturally and linguistically appropriate health services. • Explain why providing culturally competent care is essential to improving overall individual and population-based health outcomes.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $225,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.