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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 25 found.

Ensuring Equity in COVID-19 Decision Making: Equity Lens Tool for Health Departments. Year Developed: 2021. Source: Human Impact Partners and Big Cities Health Coalition. Presenter(s): Lili Farhang, Heather Jue Northover, and Gretchen Musicant. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Recording of January 11, 2021 webinar where Human Impact Partners and Big Cities Health Coalition discuss their tool to support health departments in addressing equity in COVID-19 response. Featuring Lili Farhang, Co-Director, Human Impact Partners, Heather Jue Northover, Director, Center for Health Equity, Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, and Gretchen Musicant, Commissioner, City of Minneapolis Health Department.

Learning Objectives: • Reenergize the practice of applying an equity lens in COVID-19 decision making. • Assess how decisions will be experienced by specific communities and ensure these decisions work for the people most impacted. • Learn an approach for engaging with and remaining accountable to communities historically disenfranchised from decision making.

Advancing Equity and Justice by Connecting Evaluation to Strategy. Year Developed: 2021. Source: Community Science. Presenter(s): Kien Lee, Anand Dholika. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar will share lessons learned about how to successfully get your Strategy and Evaluation teams to work together to create effective feedback loops. What typically gets in the way – Tradition. Threat to strategy team. Level of effort. Institutional norms.

Strategies for Promoting Health Equity in your State. Year Developed: 2019. Source: National MCH Workforce Development Center. Presenter(s): Rebecca Greenleaf, Nevillene White, et al.. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Intermediate. Length: n.a..

Annotation: A commonly asked question across states is “What strategic steps can we take to advance health equity at our health department?” 1 In response to this need in the field the MCH Navigator in collaboration with the National MCH Workforce Development Center created this learning opportunity to assist MCH professionals in answering that question. Originally a full presentation focused on health equity conducted by the National MCH Workforce Development Center, we have separated it into multiple sections for easier access and the ability for learners to quickly locate specific sections of interest. This resource is formatted to include the following sections: an introduction, 10 individual strategies to achieve health equity, a presentation by Nevillene White of the New York State Department of Health which provides success stories applying health equity strategies in the field, and a short wrap up with additional resources provided.

Project READY: Reimagining Equity & Access for Diverse Youth. Year Developed: 2019. Source: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's School of Information and Library Science. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Professional Development Curriculum. Level: Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: Research shows that youth services library staff in both public and school libraries recognize the need for professional and personal knowledge related to race and racism and anti-racist work (Hughes-Hassell & Stivers, 2015); however, there are currently few comprehensive resources that specifically address the needs of library professionals. The Project READY curriculum addresses this gap in existing professional development opportunities for youth services library staff.

Learning Objectives: • Introduce youth services library staff to research in areas such as race and racism, critical theory, and culturally responsive or sustaining pedagogy. • Establish a shared understanding of foundational concepts and issues related to race, racism, and racial equity. • Encourage self-reflection related to race and racial identity for both white and BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and People of Color) library staff in public and school libraries. • Amplify the work of practitioners and scholars who are providing inclusive and culturally responsive services for youth of color and Indigenous youth. • Provide concrete strategies for creating and/or improving library programs and services for Black youth, Indigenous youth, and children and teens of color.

Health Equity: Start Where You Are. Year Developed: 2019. Source: Natinonal Institute for Children's Health Quality. Presenter(s): Stacy Scott, PhD, MPA and Elizabeth Coté, MD, MPA. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar is designed to support individuals who are pursuing equity within the health care system. It provides: • An overview of health equity and implicit bias, and their impact on children's health, • A modeling exercise to explore how to recognize and address individual implicit bias, and • Resources and guidance to help attendees continue this journey after the webinar.

Diversity and Health Equity Training Brief. Year Developed: 2018. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This training brief focuses on online trainings and resources for use by the Title V workforce in approaching diversity as a way to address health disparities, health equity, and removing barriers to care.

Community Development as a Partner for Health Equity. Year Developed: 2018. Source: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families & Communities, Maternal and Child Health Life Course Research Network (LCRN). Presenter(s): Douglas Jutte, MD, MPH; Daniel Lau, MPH. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 15 minutes.

Annotation: Through this webinar, the Build Healthy Places Network provides an overview of the community development sector, a multi-billion-dollar sector that serves as an action arm for addressing social determinants of health through the development and financing of affordable housing, grocery stores, community centers, health clinics, and services in low- and moderate-income communities. The overview focuses on the sector’s alignment with the health equity goals of public health, shared measurement strategies, and emerging opportunities for cross-sector collaboration.

Special Instructions: This link goes to a preview; to view the full video, download it or add it to your dropbox.

State Approaches to Addressing Health Disparities. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Conference of State Legislatures and Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. Presenter(s): Shavon Arline-Bradley; Jim Abeler, Sarah Hernandez. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 58 minutes.

Annotation: Health disparities—differences in health and health care experienced by groups based on social, economic and environmental factors—persist across the nation. Each year, health disparities lead to significant human and financial costs, as certain people experience poorer living conditions, worse health status and treatment outcomes, and more difficulty accessing health care services than their peers in other population groups. State legislators have pursued various policy approaches to reduce health disparities in their communities and states. Through legislative tracking, NCSL has identified multiple strategies being pursued by states, including increasing workforce diversity, improving cultural competence in health care services and addressing the social determinants of health. This webinar, sponsored by NCSL and the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, discusses why state policymakers may consider addressing health disparities, and explore state policy approaches and examples.

Measuring Health Disparities. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Michigan Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This interactive course focuses on some basic issues for public health practice -- how to understand, define and measure health disparity. This course examines the language of health disparity to come to some common understanding of what that term means, explains key measures of health disparity and shows how to calculate them. This course was originally released in 2005. Given its success as a foundational course, updates were made in 2017 for this new, web-based version.

Learning Objectives: By the end of the first content section (which includes Part I What are Health Disparities? and Part II Issues in Measuring Health Disparities), you will be able to: • Identify the dimensions of health disparity as described in Healthy People 2020 • List three definitions of health disparity. • Interpret health disparity in graphical representations of data. • Explain relative and absolute disparity. • Describe how reference groups can affect disparity measurement. By the end of the second content section (which includes Part III Measures of Health Disparities and Part IV Analytic Steps in Measuring Health Disparity), you will be able to: • Describe at least three complex measures of health disparities. • List strengths and weaknesses of at least three health disparity measures. •Summarize the analytic steps in measuring health disparity.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: 3 CHES; 3.3 CNE Contact Hours

Introduction to Cultural Competency and Humility. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Wisconsin Center for Public Health Education and Training. Presenter(s): Jameela Ali, MPH. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Introductory. Length: n.a..

Annotation: The ever-increasing diversity of our communities in Wisconsin and across the nation warrants increased cultural awareness on the part of public health professionals. By understanding the importance of cultural awareness, cultural competence and cultural humility, public health professionals will be better equipped to eliminate the long-standing disparities in the health and mental health status of diverse racial, ethnic, and cultural groups. This module provides a basic foundation in the philosophy, values, and conceptual frameworks of cultural competence and cultural humility. 

Learning Objectives: • Increase awareness and appreciation for the cultural diversity of Wisconsin • Define and understand concepts of culture, cultural awareness, cultural humility, and cultural competence • Identify how to incorporate cultural humility into public health through practical application • Highlight capacities and skills necessary to work effectively across diverse cultures

Special Instructions: Requires Adobe Flash.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $225,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.