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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 22 found.

Diversity and Health Equity Training Brief. Year Developed: 2018. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This training brief focuses on online trainings and resources for use by the Title V workforce in approaching diversity as a way to address health disparities, health equity, and removing barriers to care.

Community Development as a Partner for Health Equity. Year Developed: 2018. Source: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families & Communities, Maternal and Child Health Life Course Research Network (LCRN). Presenter(s): Douglas Jutte, MD, MPH; Daniel Lau, MPH. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 15 minutes.

Annotation: Through this webinar, the Build Healthy Places Network provides an overview of the community development sector, a multi-billion-dollar sector that serves as an action arm for addressing social determinants of health through the development and financing of affordable housing, grocery stores, community centers, health clinics, and services in low- and moderate-income communities. The overview focuses on the sector’s alignment with the health equity goals of public health, shared measurement strategies, and emerging opportunities for cross-sector collaboration.

Special Instructions: This link goes to a preview; to view the full video, download it or add it to your dropbox.

State Approaches to Addressing Health Disparities. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Conference of State Legislatures and Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. Presenter(s): Shavon Arline-Bradley; Jim Abeler, Sarah Hernandez. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 58 minutes.

Annotation: Health disparities—differences in health and health care experienced by groups based on social, economic and environmental factors—persist across the nation. Each year, health disparities lead to significant human and financial costs, as certain people experience poorer living conditions, worse health status and treatment outcomes, and more difficulty accessing health care services than their peers in other population groups. State legislators have pursued various policy approaches to reduce health disparities in their communities and states. Through legislative tracking, NCSL has identified multiple strategies being pursued by states, including increasing workforce diversity, improving cultural competence in health care services and addressing the social determinants of health. This webinar, sponsored by NCSL and the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, discusses why state policymakers may consider addressing health disparities, and explore state policy approaches and examples.

Measuring Health Disparities. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Michigan Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This interactive course focuses on some basic issues for public health practice -- how to understand, define and measure health disparity. This course examines the language of health disparity to come to some common understanding of what that term means, explains key measures of health disparity and shows how to calculate them. This course was originally released in 2005. Given its success as a foundational course, updates were made in 2017 for this new, web-based version.

Learning Objectives: By the end of the first content section (which includes Part I What are Health Disparities? and Part II Issues in Measuring Health Disparities), you will be able to: • Identify the dimensions of health disparity as described in Healthy People 2020 • List three definitions of health disparity. • Interpret health disparity in graphical representations of data. • Explain relative and absolute disparity. • Describe how reference groups can affect disparity measurement. By the end of the second content section (which includes Part III Measures of Health Disparities and Part IV Analytic Steps in Measuring Health Disparity), you will be able to: • Describe at least three complex measures of health disparities. • List strengths and weaknesses of at least three health disparity measures. •Summarize the analytic steps in measuring health disparity.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: 3 CHES; 3.3 CNE Contact Hours

Introduction to Cultural Competency and Humility. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Wisconsin Center for Public Health Education and Training. Presenter(s): Jameela Ali, MPH. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Introductory. Length: n.a..

Annotation: The ever-increasing diversity of our communities in Wisconsin and across the nation warrants increased cultural awareness on the part of public health professionals. By understanding the importance of cultural awareness, cultural competence and cultural humility, public health professionals will be better equipped to eliminate the long-standing disparities in the health and mental health status of diverse racial, ethnic, and cultural groups. This module provides a basic foundation in the philosophy, values, and conceptual frameworks of cultural competence and cultural humility. 

Learning Objectives: • Increase awareness and appreciation for the cultural diversity of Wisconsin • Define and understand concepts of culture, cultural awareness, cultural humility, and cultural competence • Identify how to incorporate cultural humility into public health through practical application • Highlight capacities and skills necessary to work effectively across diverse cultures

Special Instructions: Requires Adobe Flash.

Data for Addressing Health Disparities. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Presenter(s): Teresa Litton. Type: Webcast. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This webcast presents key findings from the Washington Health Alliance’s 2014 Disparities in Care Report that health care providers and their community partners can use to jointly address racial and ethnic disparities in health. Utilizing the report and its Medicaid claims analysis, health-related organizations can see how care is or is not provided and where opportunities for collaboration may exist.

Learning Objectives: • Increase knowledge of the Washington Health Alliance as a partner in health system transformation and population health efforts. • Increase understanding of health care data available through the Washington Health Alliance. • Identify five key findings from the Washington Health Alliance’s 2014 Disparities in Care report.

Special Instructions: Webinar participants will be encouraged to share ideas for using data to promote population health and health equity. Slides will be available the morning of the session on the Hot Topics website. This session will be recorded and the archive posted by the next day. We offer audio for this webinar through the phone or through your computer's speakers. Due to differences in internet quality at viewers' locations, we can't guarantee that the computer audio will be smooth and continuous. If the audio cuts out and is distracting, please call in on the phone line instead.

Addressing Disparities and Disproportionality in Systems Serving Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. Year Developed: 2015. Source: National Center for Cultural Competence. Presenter(s): Diana Autin, Tawara D. Goode, Andy Imparato, Thomas Uno. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Advanced. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: This forum explores contributing factors to disparities and disproportionality and what three organizations are doing at the policy and practice levels to mitigate them. It begins with a discussion on how, when compared to non-Hispanic Whites, members of other racial and ethnic groups continue to be adversely impacted by health and health care disparities. It continues by exploring the overrepresentation of students primarily African American and most recently Latino in special education and children and youth with disabilities (across racial and ethnic groups) who are disproportionately placed in this nation’s juvenile justice system.

Learning Objectives: • Define and differentiate between health and health care disparities. • Define disproportionality and overrepresentation. • Cite the impact of disparities and disproportionality on individuals with disabilities and their families. • List three approaches to combat or mitigate health/health care disparities and disproportionality in education and juvenile justice. • Reflect on the role of leadership in bringing about change.

Using the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) to Conduct Life Course Analyses (Using Existing Data to Examine Life Course Health Development). Year Developed: 2014. Source: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families & Communities, Maternal and Child Health Life Course Research Network (LCRN). Presenter(s): Narayan Sastry, PhD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar presents an overview of conducting lifecourse analysis with the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID). Origins of PSID, study designs and core PSID content areas are reviewed. An additional example of analyzing the long-term demographic effects of Hurricane Katrina on the pre-storm population in New Orleans in also included.

Learning Objectives:

Special Instructions: Click on "Webinar recording available here" to view a 15-minute preview on Dropbox. To view the entire webinar, download or add it to your Dropbox. Please note that during the first few minutes of this webinar, there is no visual, so you will see a black screen.

Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) to Conduct Life Course Analyses (Using Existing Data to Examine Life Course Health Development). Year Developed: 2014. Source: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families & Communities, Maternal and Child Health Life Course Research Network (LCRN). Presenter(s): Elizabeth Cooksey, PhD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar, part of the LCRN’s series based on the Handbook of Life Course Health Development and features Elizabeth Cooksey as the presenter. In this training, participants will learn how to use the NLS surveys to conduct research analysis. A brief history of the survey, examples from the field and research illustrations are presented.

Learning Objectives:

Special Instructions: Click on "Slides available here" and/or "Audio available here."

Health Impact Reviews: A Step Toward Health Equity in All Policies. Year Developed: 2014. Source: Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Presenter(s): Christy Hoff, MPH; Sierra Rotakhina, MPH. Type: Webcast. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Representatives from the Washington State Board of Health and Governor's Interagency Council on Health Disparities discuss how they use Health Impact Reviews (HIR) to analyze how proposed legislation or budgetary changes could impact community health. The presentation provides an overview of the HIR framework and methods, a discussion of who can request an HIR, and case examples about bullying and mental health awareness bills. Presenters also discuss their outreach efforts to state legislators and their staff to increase demand for their services.

Learning Objectives: • Describe the health impact review framework and methods. • Outline the types of legislative proposals that make good candidates for a health impact review. • Describe how public health practitioners in every arena can contribute to and benefit from this work.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.