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Displaying records 1 through 6 of 6 found.

Ethics and Professionalism Moral Distress Series Part II: The Role of Courage and Culture. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Department of Veterans Affairs, Employee Education System and National Center for Ethics in Health Care. Presenter(s): Lisa Lehmann. Type: Webinar. Level: Advanced. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: The purpose of this knowledge-based recorded webinar, The Role of Courage and Culture, is to describe how trouble speaking up can lead to moral distress and present two potential methods to alleviate this issue: cultivating moral courage and improving organizational culture. Dr. Lisa S. Lehmann will explain why health care providers often had trouble in voicing moral and ethical concerns and how this can lead to moral distress. She will describe research which shows that cultivating moral courage can encourage employees to speak up about professionalism and patient safety concerns. She will also describe how efforts to improve organizational culture can foster ethical leadership, psychological safety and greater interprofessional teamwork, which in turn can reduce moral distress. This training will expand upon the work presented in the first session of this series, giving employees and leaders across VA concrete tools to address moral distress in their local settings. There is a post-test and evaluation after completing the course.

Learning Objectives: • Define moral distress. • Identify the relationship between moral courage and speaking up. • Describe the role of moral courage in reducing moral distress.

Special Instructions: Registration required to access this course.

Continuing Education: See course listing for CE details.

5-Minute MCH. Year Developed: 2015. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): Varies.. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: 5-Minute MCH is a microlearning program designed to cover each of the 12 MCH Leadership Competencies. The program is structured using an easy-to-follow modular format designed to increase knowledge and skills through 5-minute intensive learning sessions. In module 1 of each competency, participants will learn about a new competency through a 5-minute video podcast. This includes learning what knowledge and skill sets each competency contains and how they are important in the daily work of MCH professionals. In module 2 of each competency, participants will receive 5 highly focused learning opportunities for that competency. Learners may take one or all of the trainings to sharpen knowledge and skills. In module 3 of each competency, participants will receive 5 implementation strategies to put knowledge to practice. Learners may share their experiences implementing the strategies on the 5-Minute Portal. In module 4 of each competency, participants will hear a 5-minute presentation from an expert in the field.

A Master Class in Public Health Ethics. Year Developed: 2014. Source: National Association of County and City Health Officials. Presenter(s): Drue Barrett, Ph.D.; Alan Melnick, M.D., M.P.H., C.P.H.; Leonard Ortmann, Ph.D.; Matthew Stefanak, M.P.H.; Karyn Clark, M.A.; Jane Wernsman, R.N., B.S.N.; Linda Doerge, M.P.A.. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 74 minutes.

Annotation: The webinar highlights a set of recommendations designed to help local health departments (LHDs) build a formal infrastructure for addressing ethical issues. Guest speakers from two LHDs also share examples of ethical challenges they face, and a panel of public health ethics experts provides technical assistance.

Ethics in Public Health: A Closer Look at Current Issues. Year Developed: 2013. Source: University at Albany School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Bruce White, DO, JD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 58 minutes. YouTube video

Annotation: This webinar examines the definition of public health ethics, explores how ethical issues in public health may differ from other ethical issues by explaining the 12 Ethical Public Health Guidelines, and reviews several current issues in public health ethics, including the flu vaccine, over-the-counter contraception, medical majijuana, and physician-assisted suicide. Handouts of the presentation (41 slides), CE credit information, and an evaluation and post-test are provided.

Learning Objectives: • Describe the difference between professional ethics, research ethics, clinical ethics, and public health ethics. • List at least two current issues in public health ethics. • Evaluate and apply decision-making frameworks to analyze ethical challenges in public health.

Continuing Education: Nursing Contact Hours, CME, and CHES credits are available. Users need to fill out an evaluation and post-test.

Practical Law for Public Health Officials. Year Developed: 2011. Source: Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Presenter(s): Jeffrey Killip, JD, MPH and Susan Allan, MD, JD, MPH. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: Do you know how the law contributed to motor vehicle safety, vaccination, or safer workplaces? Law reform or litigation has played a part in most of the greatest public health achievements in the 20th century. As public health professionals and leaders, understanding public health law and how to use it is essential to protecting the public’s health. In this module, you will learn how to assess when to involve legal counsel, how to get effective legal advice, and what laws will affect your decision-making ability when facing public health threats. By the end, you will be able to use core concepts of public health law to more effectively protect the public’s health while avoiding legal trouble.

Learning Objectives: • Recognize legal issues. • Formulate legal questions. • Implement effective strategies for working with legal counsel. • Describe key principles of public health law. • Identify key public health laws that govern leadership’s responsibilities, authority, and limitations.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: 1.5 CNE Contact Hours

Protecting Human Research Participants. Year Developed: 2008. Source: National Institutes of Health. Presenter(s): n/a. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 180 minutes.

Annotation: This course is intended for use by individuals pursuing human subject research. It includes 7 modules and 4 quizzes. Topics addressed include the history of human subject participation, including War Crimes, and the Tuskegee Syphilis Study, the three ethical principles made in the Belmont Report, and the informed consent process. Justice, equity and special group consent also are covered, as are risks and benefits of participatory research, the role of Institutional Review Boards (IRB), and clinical trial requirements . The course has been retired as of Sept. 28, 2018; archival materials are available as a reference.

Learning Objectives: • Describe the history and importance of human subjects protections. • Identify research activities that involve human subjects. • Discover the risks a research project might pose to participants. • Understand how to minimize the risks posed by a research project. • Describe additional protections needed for vulnerable populations. • Understand additional issues that should be considered for international research. • Describe appropriate procedures for recruiting research participants and obtaining informed consent. • Identify the different committees that monitor human subjects protections. • Understand the importance of study design in the protection of research participants.

Special Instructions: Registration is required then click on "Registration".

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $225,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.