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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 12 found.

Ethics and Professionalism Moral Distress Series Part II: The Role of Courage and Culture. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Department of Veterans Affairs, Employee Education System and National Center for Ethics in Health Care. Presenter(s): Lisa Lehmann. Type: Webinar. Level: Advanced. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: The purpose of this knowledge-based recorded webinar, The Role of Courage and Culture, is to describe how trouble speaking up can lead to moral distress and present two potential methods to alleviate this issue: cultivating moral courage and improving organizational culture. Dr. Lisa S. Lehmann will explain why health care providers often had trouble in voicing moral and ethical concerns and how this can lead to moral distress. She will describe research which shows that cultivating moral courage can encourage employees to speak up about professionalism and patient safety concerns. She will also describe how efforts to improve organizational culture can foster ethical leadership, psychological safety and greater interprofessional teamwork, which in turn can reduce moral distress. This training will expand upon the work presented in the first session of this series, giving employees and leaders across VA concrete tools to address moral distress in their local settings. There is a post-test and evaluation after completing the course.

Learning Objectives: • Define moral distress. • Identify the relationship between moral courage and speaking up. • Describe the role of moral courage in reducing moral distress.

Special Instructions: Registration required to access this course.

Continuing Education: See course listing for CE details.

Public Health Learning Modules. Year Developed: 2014. Source: Association for Prevention Teaching and Research. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Interactive Modules. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-Paced.

Annotation: Public Health Learning Modules are a teaching tool to advance knowledge of policy initiatives, existing and emerging research, and transformative models. They contain video lectures, slide presentations, student assessments, in-class activities and resources. The following 15 modules follow the framework of Healthy People 2020, the science-based 10-year national objectives for improving the health of all Americans: Module 1--Advancing Healthy People 2020: Learning and Practice Module 2--The Legal Infrastructure of Public Health Module 3--Social Determinants of Health: a Lens for Public Health Module 4--Emergencies: Prevention, Preparedness, Response and Recovery Module 5--Tobacco Use: Prevention, Cessation and Policy Module 6--Substance Use: Addressing Addiction and Emerging Issues Module 7--Mental Health: A Systems Approach Module 8--Access to Health Services: Multiple Perspectives Module 9--Healthcare Associated Infections Across the Spectrum of Care Module 10--Health Information Technology: Using Data to Inform Practice Module 11--Food: Obesity, Access and Ongoing Issues Module 12--Injury Prevention: Targeting Teen Driving Module 13--Using Policy and Best Practices in Maternal, Infant and Child Health: Maternity Care Coalition Module 14--Using Best Practices to Provide Health Services to the LGBT Population: The Mazzoni Center Module 15--Oral Health Across the Lifespan Module 16--Public Health Infrastructure in the United States: An Integrated System Module 17--Environmental Health: Issues and Impact Last Module--Bringing it All Together: Healthy People 2020 in the Classroom and Beyond

Learning Objectives: Module 1--Advancing Health People 2020: Learning and Practice • Introduce the Healthy People 2020 Learning Modules project. • Define the overarching goals of the Healthy People 2020 initiative. • Describe the available data to track progress related to Healthy People objectives. • Explain the modules format and how Healthy People can more effectively be integrated into public health education. Module 2--The Legal Infrastructure of Public Health • Understand the importance of law in the Public Health infrastructure. • Integrate law and Public Health systems research and practice. • Recognize infrastructural Public Health law at work. Module 3--Social Determinants of Health: a Lens for Public Health • Understand the overarching framework of the Social Determinants of Health (SDOH) and how they are woven throughout all of the topic areas of Healthy People 2020. • Identify the five domains of SDOH within Healthy People 2020. • Explore the impact of SDOH on population health through practical application. Module 4--Emergencies: Prevention, Preparedness, Response and Recovery • Describe the history of emergencies and their influence on prevention activities. • Evaluate methods for preparing for emergencies at the individual, community, and governmental levels. • Describe the process for emergency response for different scales/types of emergencies citing specific examples. • Assess the emergency recovery process and the challenges therein for different types of emergencies. Module 5--Tobacco Use: Prevention, Cessation and Policy • Improve knowledge of policy and program applications to influence tobacco screening and cessation assessment, advice, and counseling in health care settings involving traditional and emerging tobacco products. • Increase knowledge and policy applications to improve indoor (and outdoor) smoke-free laws in a variety of settings. • Expand knowledge and applications for the development of increasing federal, state, and local taxes on tobacco products to reduce tobacco consumption. Module 6--Substance Use: Addressing Addiction and Emerging Issues • Increase knowledge of prevalence, challenges and opportunities for addressing current substance abuse problems through policy and preventive programs. • Improve knowledge of the prevalence, issues, challenges and opportunities for reducing the prevalence of underage drinking and driving in the US through current policies and preventive programs. •Improve knowledge of the prevalence, challenges and opportunities for reducing prescription drug abuse through current policies and preventive programs. Module 7--Mental Health: A Systems Approach Coming Soon... Module 8--Access to Health Services: Multiple Perspectives • Understand how access to care is defined. • Describe barriers to access. • Identify and describe the components of the safety net. Module 9--Healthcare Associated Infections Across the Spectrum of Care • Understand the burden and nature of healthcare-associated infections across the spectrum of care. • Discuss prevention strategies that are effective across the spectrum of care. • Review the epidemiology associated with the most common hospital-associated infections. • Examine the causes of healthcare-associated infections in long-term care facilities. • Identify the risk for healthcare-associated infections in ambulatory care settings. Module 10--Health Information Technology: Using Data to Inform Practice • Introduce the topic of Health Information Technology. • Review the primary uses of Health Information Technology in practice. • Describe the use of Health Information Technology as it impacts population health. Module 11--Food: Obesity, Access and Ongoing Issues • Understand connections between the built environment and health. • Review current recommendations, practices and progress in the field working to provide access to affordable nutritious food. • Examine current research on food access strategies and health promotion. • Describe the process of engaging stakeholders and stimulate policy change. Module 12--Injury Prevention: Targeting Teen Driving • Introduce the topic of injury prevention, focusing on teen driving crashes. • Discuss data sources to evaluate the magnitude of the issue and success of interventions. • Explain existing policy interventions. • Describe the specific example of New Jersey’s teen driver policy. Module 13--Using Policy and Best Practices in Maternal, Infant and Child Health: Maternity Care Coalition • Describe the utility of a multi-faceted approach to address maternal, infant and child health issues. • Identify policy approaches to public health issues being addressed by • Community Based Organizations. • Describe the components of a multi-tiered breastfeeding promotion initiative. Module 14--Using Best Practices to Provide Health Services to the LGBT Popualtion: The Mazzoni Center • Describe cultural competence as it relates to LGBT health services. • Identify key policy issues in the LGBT population. • Describe the components of culturally competent LGBT services. Module 15--Bringing it All Together: Healthy People 2020 in the Classroom and Beyond • Describe the various ways public health officials use Healthy People 2020 in the municipal public health system. • Identify at least two opportunities to demonstrate knowledge and use of Healthy People 2020 in ongoing and future work.

Continuing Education: Each module has continuing education credits; the courses expire 12/1/2017

Public Health Ethics Training Series. Year Developed: 2014. Source: North Carolina Institute for Public Health. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: The "Public Health Ethics" training series is designed to promote the ethical practice of public health by teaching about the ethical principles of public health and by providing resources for creating an ethical climate in public health agencies and schools of public health. This 8 Module series includes the following topics: • 1-Distinguishing Public Health Ethics from Medical Ethics • 2-Values and Beliefs Inherent to a Public Health Perspective • 3-The Public Health Code of Ethics • 4-Law and Ethics in Public Health • 5-Pandemic Influenza: A Justice Case Study • 6-Decision-making in Public Health Ethics • 7-Barriers to the Ethical Practice of Public Health • 8-Responding to Unethical Events

Learning Objectives: Module 1--Distinguishing Public Health Ethics from Medical Ethics • Describe the common practice settings from which medical ethics and public health ethics emerge. • Explain “the tyranny of the majority”. • Explain why the medical ethics principle of autonomy does not work as well in public health. Module 2--Values and Beliefs Inherent to a Public Health Perspective • Explain how a given value or belief from the list is important to public health. Module 3--The Public Health Code of Ethics • Describe how an aspirational code can guide an ethical discussion. • Describe a situation where a given ethical principle applies in public health. • Identify means of creating an ethical environment within public health organizations. Module 4--Law and Ethics in Public Health • Describe three of the several legal powers given to public health. • Describe an ethical principle in public health that is not encoded in public health law. • Describe how the exercise of any power is an ethical issue. Module 5--Pandemic Influenza: A Justice Case Study • Provide examples of how concepts of justice are applied to anticipated responses in an influenza pandemic. Module 6--Decision-making in Public Health Ethics • Describe how to recognize an ethical issue. • Describe the elements of a fair process. • Describe the steps of ethical decision-making in a group. Module 7--Barriers to the Ethical Practice of Public Health • Identify the facets of human nature and our social environment that are particularly relevant in leading to unethical behaviors in public health. Module 8--Responding to Unethical Events • Describe the range of possible responses to an event that is clearly unethical.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account.

Continuing Education: 0.92 Certificate of Attendance

Workplace Violence Training Spotlight. Year Developed: 2013. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): Keisha Watson, PhD; Beth DeFrancis, MLS; John Richards, MA. Type: Training Series. Level: Intermediate Introductory Advanced. Length: Series, various lengths.

Annotation: This collection of over 20 learning opportunities (ranging from introductory to advanced), gathered by the MCH Navigator, presents trainings and resources to assist Title V staff and grantees in focusing on how to interact with potentially violent individuals during periods of high stress and emergency, as well as the broader prevention agenda of workplace mental wellness. Topics include: (1) online trainings, videos, manuals, and toolkits related to workplace violence and (2) mental health online trainings, manuals, blogs and other resources, including hotlines.

Ethics in Public Health: A Closer Look at Current Issues. Year Developed: 2013. Source: University at Albany School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Bruce White, DO, JD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 58 minutes. YouTube video

Annotation: This webinar examines the definition of public health ethics, explores how ethical issues in public health may differ from other ethical issues by explaining the 12 Ethical Public Health Guidelines, and reviews several current issues in public health ethics, including the flu vaccine, over-the-counter contraception, medical majijuana, and physician-assisted suicide. Handouts of the presentation (41 slides), CE credit information, and an evaluation and post-test are provided.

Learning Objectives: • Describe the difference between professional ethics, research ethics, clinical ethics, and public health ethics. • List at least two current issues in public health ethics. • Evaluate and apply decision-making frameworks to analyze ethical challenges in public health.

Continuing Education: Nursing Contact Hours, CME, and CHES credits are available. Users need to fill out an evaluation and post-test.

The Constitutional and Legal Basis for Public Health Actions. Year Developed: 2011. Source: University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Anne Barry, MPH. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: A basic understanding of public health law is essential to the practice of public health across our nation. States and local units of government have unique authority to maintain and protect the health of the people who live within their jurisdictions. However to exercise these powers, we must understand them and use them within the boundaries of the constitution and legal authority. This course will provide some very basic tools to develop a greater appreciation and understanding of the authority we have to protect the public health while maintaining the appropriate respect for individual rights that must be balanced in any of our actions.

Learning Objectives: • Have a basic understanding of the constitutional and regulatory powers in public health and how these powers are applied in public health situations and activities. • Be able to critically analyze various public health situations and activities by balancing the rights of individuals with the legal powers and duties to assure optimum population health.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: 1 Certification; 0.1 CEU/CE; 1 Contact Hours

Introduction to Ethical Frameworks for Public Health Emergencies and Disasters. Year Developed: 2010. Source: University of Minnesota Center for Public Health Preparedness. Presenter(s): Lisa Pogoff, MPH, MSW; Susan Larson, MPH, RN. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 120 minutes.

Annotation: The discusses the application of public health frameworks in emergency situations. Specific challenges and issues in disasters using ethical standards are discussed and interactive questions help guide the learner. The demands in emergencies on health care workers and different methods to allocate resources, as well as worker’s communication with the public, are additionally covered.

Learning Objectives: •Define what behaviors are morally acceptable. •Specify how people should act in various situations. •Reflect historical/cultural values and principles.

Special Instructions: Registration to the University of Minnesota School of Public Health is required. If direct link doesn't work, see their main menu under URL2 field and scroll down to "Introduction to Ethical Frameworks for Public Health Emergencies and Disasters."

Continuing Education: 1 Continuing Education Hour . A post test and certificate are available upon completion.

Facing Ethical Challenges; Dealing with Outcomes: Stories from the Field. Year Developed: 2009. Source: Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Presenter(s): Harvey Kayman, MD, MPH. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 40 minutes.

Annotation: With an intended audience of local and state public health workers, this presentation draws on stories from public health professionals of scenarios demonstrating ethical dilemmas they’ve encountered. Participation from audience members centered on how they think a given struggle should be resolved makes this an interactive webinar. Dr. Kayman discusses the differences in biomedical and public health ethics and frames his discussion around beneficence and justice. A protocol plan that public health professionals might use to guide decision-making during crises also is presented. Slides and handouts area available for use.

Learning Objectives: • List and describe public health ethical principles and an ethical framework to resolve moral tensions disasters might bring up. • Explain how the scenarios presented illustrate how the framework and principles can be used. • Develop methods to make decisions with collaborators in the midst of a disaster.

Special Instructions: To access the presentation, scroll to the bottom of the landing page and click “Play Recording.”

Outbreak at Watersedge. Year Developed: 2004. Source: University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Jayne Griffith, MA, MPH. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 60 minutes. Link to all online trainings.

Annotation: In this short, web-based interactive exercise, individuals learn about concepts of environmental and public health by helping to recognize, investigate, test, and draw conclusions about an epidemic. Learners will review patient interviews, map potential contaminant sites, visit the source of the outbreak, and draw conclusions from lab results and observations. In addition to gaining knowledge about environmental health, individuals will also learn about the roles of various public health professionals at a local health department.

The History of Public Health Informatics: Where Do We Go from Here?. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: South Central Public Health Partnership. Presenter(s): Nir Menachemi, PhD, MPH . Type: Online Course. Level: Advanced. Length: Self-paced. Troubleshooting Tips for South Central Public Health Partnership Courses

Annotation: What is public health informatics (PHI)? Simply put, PHI is a sub-field of public health. Program faculty will journey through the evolution of public health informatics and describe how key events over the past decade have contributed to development and utilization of many computerized systems that support public health practice. Special focus will be given to major PHI applications including syndromic surveillance. Emerging (e.g., geographic information systems, text-messaging) and future (e.g., social networking, public health information exchange) PHI applications will also be discussed.

Learning Objectives: • Discuss how the sub-discipline of public health informatics has evolved over time. • Describe how health information technology (HIT) can be used to enhance public health practice. • List potential ethical, social, and political issues associated with the development of HIT applications for public health purposes.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: Certificate of Attendance

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.