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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 59 found. Sorted by

Learning Opportunities for the Title V Workforce in Communities and at the Local Level Training Brief. Year Developed: Unknown. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This training brief focuses on those skills needed in communities as identified by CityMatCH's Strategic Work Plan. It covers collaboration and partnerships; evaluation; health equity and social justice for improved family and community health; use of data strategically for the transformation of family and community health; engaging and strengthening MCH leaders; and community health centers.

Diversity and Health Equity Training Brief. Year Developed: 2018. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This training brief focuses on online trainings and resources for use by the Title V workforce in approaching diversity as a way to address health disparities, health equity, and removing barriers to care.

Community Development as a Partner for Health Equity. Year Developed: 2018. Source: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families & Communities, Maternal and Child Health Life Course Research Network (LCRN). Presenter(s): Douglas Jutte, MD, MPH; Daniel Lau, MPH. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 15 minutes.

Annotation: Through this webinar, the Build Healthy Places Network provides an overview of the community development sector, a multi-billion-dollar sector that serves as an action arm for addressing social determinants of health through the development and financing of affordable housing, grocery stores, community centers, health clinics, and services in low- and moderate-income communities. The overview focuses on the sector’s alignment with the health equity goals of public health, shared measurement strategies, and emerging opportunities for cross-sector collaboration.

Special Instructions: This link goes to a preview; to view the full video, download it or add it to your dropbox.

Where To Find MCH Resources: An Introduction. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health. Presenter(s): Keisha Watson and John Richards. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Introductory. Length: 18 minutes.

Annotation: This short presentation discusses the information needs of MCH professionals and identifies distinct online resources to address those needs, from pop and professional sources such as Google, PubMed, and Wikipedia to grant-supported resources that address MCHB topical programs and initiatives. Topics include data warehouses, research centers, epidemiology sites, professional and membership organizations

Learning Objectives: • Identify information needs of professionals • Explain the differences between types of online resources • Differentiate between trusted and questionable online resources • Understand where to go to find additional resources

State Approaches to Addressing Health Disparities. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Conference of State Legislatures and Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. Presenter(s): Shavon Arline-Bradley; Jim Abeler, Sarah Hernandez. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 58 minutes.

Annotation: Health disparities—differences in health and health care experienced by groups based on social, economic and environmental factors—persist across the nation. Each year, health disparities lead to significant human and financial costs, as certain people experience poorer living conditions, worse health status and treatment outcomes, and more difficulty accessing health care services than their peers in other population groups. State legislators have pursued various policy approaches to reduce health disparities in their communities and states. Through legislative tracking, NCSL has identified multiple strategies being pursued by states, including increasing workforce diversity, improving cultural competence in health care services and addressing the social determinants of health. This webinar, sponsored by NCSL and the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, discusses why state policymakers may consider addressing health disparities, and explore state policy approaches and examples.

Public Health Pronto. Year Developed: 2017. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: Self-paced. Module Menu

Annotation: Public Health Pronto is one of the MCH Navigator's microlearning projects that allows you to participate in short bursts of learning to improve your public health skills. Similar in format to the 5-Minute MCH microlearning program, Public Health Pronto has an improved the format, while keeping the emphasis on just-in-time, incremental, communal learning that can be accessed on-the-go to match your fast-paced work life. The program addresses the eight Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals and three Health Transformation cores (in collaboration with the National MCH Workforce Development Center), putting key public health concepts into alignment with MCH priorities by using an easy-to-follow modular format designed to increase your knowledge and skills through 5-minute intensive learning sessions.

Protecting Human Subjects and Institutional Review Boards: An Overview. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Justice Research and Statistics Association. Presenter(s): Ross Hickey, JD, CIP, CIPA; George Shaler, MPH. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 61 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar introduces participants to the basics of institutional review board (IRBs), the need for them and when to submit research protocols for review to an IRB. The webinar, webinar slides, and participant biographies are available.

Learning Objectives: • How do I know if I am doing human subject research? • How does an IRB ensure the rights and welfare of human subjects involved in research are adequately protected? • Participants will learn to "issue spot" where the need for an IRB is likely to arise. • Participants will understand the background and purpose of the relevant human subject research regulations. • Participants will understand how to draft functional IRB protocols and procedures.

Mini-tutorials [on human subjects research]. Year Developed: 2017. Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Human Research Protections. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: Series, various lengths.

Annotation: This series of short tutorials (about 15 minutes each) focus on specific aspects of U. S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP) human subjects regulations and policy. They include Institutional Review Board (IRB) review criteria, quorum and voting in IRB meetings; membership requirements for IRBs, prisoner research series, and OHRP reporting requirements.

Measuring Health Disparities. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Michigan Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This interactive course focuses on some basic issues for public health practice -- how to understand, define and measure health disparity. This course examines the language of health disparity to come to some common understanding of what that term means, explains key measures of health disparity and shows how to calculate them. This course was originally released in 2005. Given its success as a foundational course, updates were made in 2017 for this new, web-based version.

Learning Objectives: By the end of the first content section (which includes Part I What are Health Disparities? and Part II Issues in Measuring Health Disparities), you will be able to: • Identify the dimensions of health disparity as described in Healthy People 2020 • List three definitions of health disparity. • Interpret health disparity in graphical representations of data. • Explain relative and absolute disparity. • Describe how reference groups can affect disparity measurement. By the end of the second content section (which includes Part III Measures of Health Disparities and Part IV Analytic Steps in Measuring Health Disparity), you will be able to: • Describe at least three complex measures of health disparities. • List strengths and weaknesses of at least three health disparity measures. •Summarize the analytic steps in measuring health disparity.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: 3 CHES; 3.3 CNE Contact Hours

Ethics and Professionalism Moral Distress Series Part II: The Role of Courage and Culture. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Department of Veterans Affairs, Employee Education System and National Center for Ethics in Health Care. Presenter(s): Lisa Lehmann. Type: Webinar. Level: Advanced. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: The purpose of this knowledge-based recorded webinar, The Role of Courage and Culture, is to describe how trouble speaking up can lead to moral distress and present two potential methods to alleviate this issue: cultivating moral courage and improving organizational culture. Dr. Lisa S. Lehmann will explain why health care providers often had trouble in voicing moral and ethical concerns and how this can lead to moral distress. She will describe research which shows that cultivating moral courage can encourage employees to speak up about professionalism and patient safety concerns. She will also describe how efforts to improve organizational culture can foster ethical leadership, psychological safety and greater interprofessional teamwork, which in turn can reduce moral distress. This training will expand upon the work presented in the first session of this series, giving employees and leaders across VA concrete tools to address moral distress in their local settings. There is a post-test and evaluation after completing the course.

Learning Objectives: • Define moral distress. • Identify the relationship between moral courage and speaking up. • Describe the role of moral courage in reducing moral distress.

Special Instructions: Registration required to access this course.

Continuing Education: See course listing for CE details.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.