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Displaying records 1 through 7 of 7 found.

From Chaos to Collaboration: Discovering Consensus Among Competing Interests. Year Developed: 2018. Source: National Conference of State Legislatures. Presenter(s): Larry Schooler. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 50 minutes.

Annotation: Legislators and staff are often faced with the challenge of making decisions, or helping to make decisions, that satisfies diverse constituencies with competing interests. In this webinar, participants learned about both the art and science behind finding consensus to address challenging public policy issues by exploring effective methods and proven techniques that produce agreement to policy challenges. Participants received with new tools and skills for creating consensus among diverse interest groups.

Giving and Receiving Feedback For Personal and Professional Growth. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Region IV Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): Shana Merlin. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: Without feedback, individuals and organizations cannot grow. Feedback is the key to better serving your community and getting the most out of your team. But giving and receiving feedback can be incredibly uncomfortable and unproductive. And when done poorly, feedback can actually be destructive. In this interactive and light-hearted session, learn the right questions to ask and how to handle the feedback – good or bad – with courtesy and professionalism. Get tools in how to deliver feedback that is specific, actionable and measurable. So instead of shrinking from feedback you can embrace it for the opportunity it is.

Learning Objectives: • Ask open, specific questions to solicit useful feedback. • Use the LAST method (Listen Apologize Solve Thank) when dealing with negative feedback. • Develop a growth mindset that is curious, flexible, and welcomes feedback as a tool for personal and professional development.

Leadership: Giving and Receiving Feedback. Year Developed: 2013. Source: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women’s and Children’s Health Policy Center. Presenter(s): Robert Wm. Blum, MD, PhD, MPH. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 40 minutes.

Annotation: In this multi-section video presentation, Dr. Blum discusses the critical importance of and challenges inherent in giving and receiving feedback, whether one is in a supervisory, employee, or peer communication situation. Strategies for effective interactions of this nature are provided.

Implementing and Sustaining Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) in an Organization. Year Developed: 2009. Source: Upper Midwest Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This course is designed for leaders and professionals who work in public health. The goal is to provide them with an awareness of quality improvement and how it can be used in public health to "work smarter, not harder". There are four sections in this course: Section 1: CQI Myths Section 2: Brief Overview of CQI Section 3: Incorporating CQI into Organizational Culture Section 4: Demonstrating How CQI works in Governmental Public Health – A Case Study

Learning Objectives: • Describe three common myths of CQI and the corresponding reality. • Define continuous quality improvement and how it can be used to enhance organizational performance. • Describe common characteristics of CQI. • Describe the elements needed for an organization to successfully implement and sustain CQI activities. • Discuss how to successfully incorporate CQI into an organization's culture. • Identify examples of how CQI has been implemented in a local public health agency.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Introduction to Management in Public Health. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Jim Begun, PhD. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes. Link to all online trainings.

Annotation: This online self-paced module focuses on the competencies and eight roles of effective managers in public health organizations. To understand personal management roles, the learner begins by completing a self-assessment on their values, skills and management style. Several tools and concepts from management theory and practice are presented, including the 360-degree feedback tool, Abilene Paradox, devil’s advocate strategy, and balanced scorecard technique. The presentation continues by describing SWOT analysis, different motivational and resistant styles, job enrichment, and dialogue techniques within specific management roles. In addition, current public health managers describe their experiences. The module requires a pre and posttest to receive credit.

Learning Objectives: • Articulate the wide range of roles and competencies of effective managers in public health. • Describe and defend a framework of eight roles for effective management practice.

Special Instructions: Registration to the University of Minnesota Centers for Public Health Education & Outreach is required. Click on “Register and take this online training.” A form and a pre-quiz need to be submitted before the presentation will load.

Continuing Education: 1 Continuing Education Hour (CEH) is available.

Advanced Leadership and Practice (Part 2). Year Developed: n.a.. Source: South Central Public Health Partnership. Presenter(s): Peter M. Ginter, PhD; Andy Rucks, PhD. Type: Online Course. Level: Advanced. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: Dramatic change will occur in public health and health care in the next decade. This course , the second of a 2-part series, provides public health practitioners and other health care providers with the leadership skills necessary to work effectively in the change environment at a community, state or regional level. These leadership skills are essential for designing and advocating for programs and policies necessary to promote health.

Learning Objectives: • Describe and discuss what leaders do. • Understand the need for a clear, exciting vision for an organization. • Identify the characteristics and components of effective visions. • Understand the need for and role of effective missions. • Identify the characteristics and components of effective missions. • Understand the ends-means relationship of mission, vision and goals and how they narrow the scope of the organization. • Show that new goals will have to be adopted for programs when the vision and mission change. • Identify strategies for understanding and supporting a consistent vision. • Understand that creating coalitions is a process of developing common interests and goals. • Identify important stakeholders. • Understand that organization and leadership are essential if coalitions are to be maintained and achieve their purpose.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: Certificate of Attendance

Advanced Leadership and Practice (Part 1). Year Developed: n.a.. Source: South Central Public Health Partnership. Presenter(s): Peter M. Ginter, PhD. Type: Online Course. Level: Advanced. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: Dramatic change will occur in public health and health care in the next decade. This course, the first of a 2-part series, provides public health practitioners and other health care providers with the leadership skills necessary to work effectively in the change environment at a community, state or regional level. These leadership skills are essential for designing and advocating for programs and policies necessary to promote health.

Learning Objectives: • Discuss the nature and role of leadership. • Discuss the difference between leadership and management. • Discuss the relationship of leadership and personality. • Discuss the importance of and how leaders use systems thinking. • Learn how to organize and assess qualitative decisions. • Discuss the importance of and how to set direction for an organization. • Discuss the importance of and how to create an organizational culture. • Understand your personal leadership philosophy.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account.

Continuing Education: Certificate of Attendance

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $225,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.