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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 37 found.

Strategies for Promoting Health Equity in your State. Year Developed: 2019. Source: National MCH Workforce Development Center. Presenter(s): Rebecca Greenleaf, Nevillene White, et al.. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Intermediate. Length: n.a..

Annotation: A commonly asked question across states is “What strategic steps can we take to advance health equity at our health department?” 1 In response to this need in the field the MCH Navigator in collaboration with the National MCH Workforce Development Center created this learning opportunity to assist MCH professionals in answering that question. Originally a full presentation focused on health equity conducted by the National MCH Workforce Development Center, we have separated it into multiple sections for easier access and the ability for learners to quickly locate specific sections of interest. This resource is formatted to include the following sections: an introduction, 10 individual strategies to achieve health equity, a presentation by Nevillene White of the New York State Department of Health which provides success stories applying health equity strategies in the field, and a short wrap up with additional resources provided.

Maternal, Child, and Adolescent Health Life Course Perspective, Practice, and Leadership Training Series. Year Developed: 2019. Source: Center of Excellence in Maternal, Child, and Adolescent Health; University of California, Berkley. Presenter(s): Michael Lu, MD, MS, MPH; Paula Braveman, MD, MPH; Kiko Malin, MSW/MPH; Anthony Iton, MD, JD, MPH; and Vijaya Hogan, MPH, DrPH. Moderated by Julianna Deardorff, PdD. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: 5 modules; self-paced. Registration link

Annotation: The Maternal, Child, and Adolescent Health (MCAH) Life Course Perspective, Practice, & Leadership course is designed to provide an understanding of life course perspective, its practical applications, and related leadership opportunities. The life course perspective is a conceptual framework for understanding health trajectories of populations over time. The life course perspective posits that broad social, economic, and environmental factors not only shape health and contribute to health outcomes but are also the underlying causes of inequities in a wide range of maternal and child health outcomes. This course first provides a brief summary of the development and central components of this perspective. Building off these foundational concepts, the course then focuses on practical applications of this perspective in both healthcare settings and public health interventions. Through interviews with leaders in the MCAH field, including clinicians, researchers, and public health practitioners, this course will highlight essential leadership knowledge and skills necessary to apply a life course perspective in practice. The course is self-directed, online, and open source, which allows participants to learn at their own speed and convenience free of charge. While the course is designed with clinical professionals and public health practitioners in mind, it is available to all learners including students and professionals in other fields.

Learning Objectives: Learning Objectives (comprehensive) By the end of the training series, participants will be able to: • Define and describe the life course perspective and its core concepts • Identify examples of how the life course perspective has been applied and implemented in practice settings across the MCAH field • Identify leadership knowledge and skills that support advancing a life course perspective in practice. • Apply life course perspective knowledge and leadership skills to individual professional development.

Special Instructions: Registration is required.

Working “Upstream” to Prevent Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs). Year Developed: 2018. Source: Children's Safety Network. Presenter(s): Joanne Klevens, Vicky Roper, and Jim Vetter. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: In this interactive webinar, Dr. Joanne Klevens, an epidemiologist at CDC, explored what ACEs are, their prevalence, their inequitable burden on low-income adults and people of color, and their impact on health and life opportunities. She introduced the World Health Organization’s (WHO) framework for addressing social determinants of health inequities and examined how CDC has used this framework to move its efforts “upstream.” Dr. Klevens presented the evidence around policies that hold the potential to prevent ACEs and the importance of “narrative” to reduce inequities. Vicky Roper, M.Ed., Director of the Kansas Children’s Service League, described how the Kansas Essentials for Childhood project is utilizing the CDC’s “Preventing Child Abuse and Neglect: A Technical Package for Policy, Norm, and Programmatic Activities” as a framework to move work addressing ACEs upstream. She also shared examples of Kansas’ advocacy, media, messaging, education and awareness, and evaluation efforts. Ms. Roper discussed Kansas’ work to foster family-friendly work environments, which can help to reduce ACEs. The webinar was moderated by Jim Vetter, Ed.M., of Education Development Center, Inc. (EDC).

Learning Objectives: • Understand what ACEs are, their prevalence, their inequitable burden on low-income adults and people of color, and their impact on health and life opportunities. • Be introduced to the World Health Organization’s (WHO) framework for addressing social determinants of health inequities • Gain experience in interpreting the evidence around policies that hold the potential to prevent ACEs and the importance of “narrative” to reduce inequities.

Opioids and Early Adversity: Connecting Childhood Trauma and Addiction. Year Developed: 2018. Source: National Conference of State Legislatures. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are potentially traumatic events, such as abuse or neglect, that can have negative, lasting effects on health and well-being. This webinar explores the connection between ACEs and the opioid epidemic. Speakers discuss how ACEs can affect later substance misuse, including the intergenerational impacts on families. Experts and legislators will highlight potential policy options and innovative state strategies.

Learning Objectives: • Understand the connection between ACEs and the opioid epidemic. • Learn examples of how ACEs can affect later substance misuse, including the intergenerational impacts on families. • Gain knowledge on how to employ potential policy options and innovative state strategies.

Diversity and Health Equity Training Brief. Year Developed: 2018. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This training brief focuses on online trainings and resources for use by the Title V workforce in approaching diversity as a way to address health disparities, health equity, and removing barriers to care.

Community Development as a Partner for Health Equity. Year Developed: 2018. Source: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families & Communities, Maternal and Child Health Life Course Research Network (LCRN). Presenter(s): Douglas Jutte, MD, MPH; Daniel Lau, MPH. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 15 minutes.

Annotation: Through this webinar, the Build Healthy Places Network provides an overview of the community development sector, a multi-billion-dollar sector that serves as an action arm for addressing social determinants of health through the development and financing of affordable housing, grocery stores, community centers, health clinics, and services in low- and moderate-income communities. The overview focuses on the sector’s alignment with the health equity goals of public health, shared measurement strategies, and emerging opportunities for cross-sector collaboration.

Special Instructions: This link goes to a preview; to view the full video, download it or add it to your dropbox.

Adverse Childhood Experiences: Trauma-Informed Strategies and Student Well-Being. Year Developed: 2018. Source: Corwin: A SAGE Publishing Company. Presenter(s): Ricky Robertson. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar focuses on a whole-staff approach to foster resilience in both students living with Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and the professionals who work with them in America's rural, suburban and urban schools. yyy

Learning Objectives: • Understand the gaps in data when addressing ACEs. • Acquire knowledge and tools to treat ACES as an equity issue. • Learn the whole-staff, multi-tiered systematic approach for addressing ACEs.

Using Geographic Information Science to Advance Heath Equity and Environmental Justice. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Region 2 Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): Andrew Maroko, PhD. Type: Webcast. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: n.a..

Annotation: Environmental factors have an important impact on the health of communities. Public health professionals may use geographic information sciences (GIS) to assess the health of communities by analyzing exposure, or being subjected to negative factors such as pollution, as well as accessibility, or the ability to access positive factors such as green space and healthy food. In this webinar, Dr. Andrew Maroko discusses the process of geovisualization, hypothesis generation, data exploration, and communication and knowledge transfer in conducting environmental justice research. Dr. Maroko also describes various methods and technologies used to estimate exposure and accessibility, and provides examples of GIS in environmental justice/health equity projects in New York City and Glasgow, Scotland.

Learning Objectives: • To describe how geographic information science can be used to advance health equity and environmental justice. • To describe the environmental factors that lead to health disparities. • To list examples of how geographic information science has been used in health equity research.

Special Instructions: Registration required before accessing this course.

Continuing Education: CHES, CPHCE

Understanding Adverse Childhood Experiences. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Conference of State Legislatures. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 55 minutes.

Annotation: Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are potentially traumatic events that can have negative, lasting effects on health and well-being of children. These experiences range from physical, emotional, or sexual abuse to parental divorce, economic hardships, or the incarceration of a parent or guardian. Multiple ACEs can lead to potentially negative consequences of riskier behavior and poorer health outcomes. This session helps legislators understand the impact of ACEs and policy options and strategies that support families and children’s health and well-being. Hear from a state that is tackling ACEs across child welfare, health and other policies.

Learning Objectives: • Understand the range of ACEs. • Be able to translate the impact of ACEs into policy options and stategies. • Learn from a state example.

Strengthening the Health Workforce Education Pipeline: Tools, Resources and Outcomes . Year Developed: 2017. Source: HRSA, The Bureau of Health Workforce. Presenter(s): Jacqueline Rodrigue; Natasha Cox. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar increases awareness of health workforce education pipeline programs and shares innovative, best practices regarding the need to recruit and retain students from disadvantaged backgrounds and underrepresented minorities (URM) to strengthen the health workforce.

Learning Objectives: • Provide the federal perspective on the shortage of students from disadvantaged backgrounds and URM in the health workforce and the value of education pipeline programs. • Highlight innovative approaches and best practice strategies for health workforce pipeline programs. • Discuss successful methods to increase recruitment and retention of students from disadvantaged backgrounds and URM to strengthen the health workforce • Share successful outcomes and measures for health workforce education pipeline programs.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.