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Displaying records 11 through 20 of 29 found.

Systems Support Maps in Five Minutes. Year Developed: 2018. Source: National MCH Workforce Development Center. Presenter(s): Seri Link, Kristen Hassmiller-Lich. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 5 minutes.

Annotation: This video describes developing a systems support map by defining one's role, responsibilities, needs, resources, and wishes, and gives an example of a pediatrician's role in treating children with special health care needs.

Process Flow Diagramming in Five Minutes. Year Developed: 2018. Source: National MCH Workforce Development Center. Presenter(s): Seri Link, Kristen Hassmiller-Lich. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 5 minutes.

Annotation: This video describes how to document work flow with process flow diagamming to better understand specific systems. The example is enhancing the system of entry to improve timely eligibility screening of children referred to public health services and reduce duplication of effort in obtaining family information.

Health Care Transition & Title V Care Coordination Initiatives. Year Developed: 2018. Source: Got Transition. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: Series; various lengths.

Annotation: This is a five-part Webinar Series featuring examples of best practices among state Title V agencies, tools and resources, and problem-solving strategies. Titles include: (1) Starting A Transition Improvement Process Using the Six Core Elements of Health Care Transition; (2) Transition Preparation; (3) Transfer to Adult Care; (4) Integration into Adult Care; and (5) Youth, Young Adult & Parent Engagement. Recordings and handouts are available.

Learning Objectives: Session 1: • Overview of health care transition baseline results from Title V care coordination (CC) programs. • Forming a HCT quality improvement team with CC team and youth/young adults/parents. • Defining HCT pilot population, timeline, measures of success. • Selecting HCT core elements and delineating roles of CC program and YSHCN providers. Session 2: • Identifying key components of HCT policy for CC programs that families/youth want to know. • Customizing transition readiness assessment (RA) for CC programs • Piloting and disseminating HCT policy and RA. • Incorporating RA skill needs into plan of care and educating youth and families on needed skills. • Preparing medical summary and emergency care plan with youth and families and their providers. Session 3: • Identifying willing adult primary and specialty providers. • Sequencing plans for transferring young adults with multiple providers. • Identifying ways to support adult practices (consultation, care coordination). • Preparing transfer package and communicating with pediatric and adult practices. Session 4: • Ensuring welcome and orientation FAQs from the adult practice to transferring young adults and pediatric practice. • Facilitating initial appointment to adult doctor, including confirmation of receipt of transfer package. • Supporting adult practice with CC assistance from Title V and linking to adult disability resources. Session 5: • Identifying youth/young adults/parents to participate in HCT initiatives in Title V CC programs. • Providing transition education and training and mentoring opportunities. • Eliciting consumer feedback with HCT care coordination process. • Building youth/young adult/parent leadership roles on HCT within state Title V programs.

Causal Loop Diagramming in Five Minutes. Year Developed: 2018. Source: National MCH Workforce Development Center. Presenter(s): Seri Link, Kristen Hassmiller-Lich. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 5 minutes.

Annotation: This video describes how causal loop diagramming works to help understand problems that change often or for which past interventions have not worked. It is illustrated with an example of the shortage of registered nurses.

Life Course Health Development of Individuals with Cerebral Palsy. Year Developed: 2017. Source: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families & Communities, Maternal and Child Health Life Course Research Network (LCRN). Presenter(s): Briano Di Rezze, PhD; Matthew Freeman, MA; Robert Palisano, PT, ScD, FAPTA; Debra Stewart, MSc, OT Reg. (Ont.). Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 15:05 minutes.

Annotation: Together these researchers from the CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research share their interpretive description of lifecourse health development of individuals with cerebral palsy to promote developmental capacities for future roles and healthy adult living beginning in childhood.

Improving Systems of Care for Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs and Autism Spectrum Disorder. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Conference of State Legislatures. Presenter(s): Tahra Johnson; Michelle Jarvis; Shawna Wright; Thomas Holmes; Susan Lontine. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: 58 minutes.

Annotation: Children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN) are defined as children who have or are at increased risk for a chronic physical, developmental, behavioral, or emotional condition and who also require health and related services of a type or amount beyond that required by children generally. For this population of children, there are often barriers to accessing treatment from a shortage of providers to lack of coverage. This webinar explores barriers to accessing care and discusses strategies that states can implement to improve systems of care for Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs (CYSHCN) and those with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

Health Equity in the Face of Change: Tools for a National Campaign Against Racism. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Region IV Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): Camara Jones, MD, MPH, PhD. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar inspires participants to stategize to act on three dimensions of health intervention, three levels of racism, and three principles for achieving health equity. Dr. Camara Jones presents a Cliff Analogy for understanding three dimensions of health intervention: providing health services, addressing the social determinants of health (including poverty and neighborhood conditions), and addressing the social determinants of equity (including racism and other systems of structured inequity). She then turns her focus to a discussion of racism as a social determinant of equity and a root cause of “racial”/ethnic differences in health outcomes. She defines racism as “a system of structuring opportunity and assigning value based on the social interpretation of how one looks (which is what we call ‘race’), that unfairly disadvantages some individuals and communities, unfairly advantages other individuals and communities, and saps the strength of the whole society through the waste of human resources.” She identifies three levels of racism (institutionalized, personally-mediated, and internalized) and illustrates these three levels with her Gardener’s Tale allegory. She then generalizes her discussion of racism to encompass other systems of structured inequity. Dr. Jones defines health equity as “assurance of the conditions for optimal health for all people,” identifies three principles for achieving health equity, and gives examples of how those principles can be operationalized. She closes with two additional allegories to equip attendees to name racism and other systems of structured inequity, ask “How is racism operating here?”, and organize and strategize to act.

Learning Objectives: • Illustrate the relationship between health services, addressing the social determinants of health, and addressing the social determinants of equity using a Cliff Analogy • Define racism as a system and identify three impacts of that system • Describe three levels of racism and illustrate those levels using the Gardener’s Tale allegory • Define health equity and identify three principles for achieving health equity

Special Instructions: After registering on the site, the site will send you an email with a link to access the training.

Achieving True Partnership: Integrating Family Engagement in Systems of Care. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Center for Medical Home Implementation, National Center for Family Professional Partnerships, Bright Futures National Center. Presenter(s): Deborah Garneau MA, Cornelia Deagle PhD MSPH, Barbara Kahler MD FAAP, Dana Yarbrough. Type: n.a.. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 56 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar identified practical strategies to facilitate partnerships between systems of care, focusing specifically on collaboration between Title V programs, state American Academy of Pediatrics Chapters, and family leadership organizations. Faculty presented lessons learned from a state-wide medical home implementation project with family leadership.

Learning Objectives: • Define and describe the characteristics of family engagement at the systems level. • Identify practical strategies and tools that encourage and measure family engagement at the systems level, including partnerships between Title V programs, state AAP chapters, and Family-to-Family Health Information Centers. • Describe evidence=based and evidence-informed practices for family engagement at the systems level.

Rethinking the Role of Stress in Development: Emerging Evolutionary Perspectives. Year Developed: 2016. Source: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families & Communities, Maternal and Child Health Life Course Research Network (LCRN). Presenter(s): Marco Del Giudice, PhD. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 61 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar explores the influence of stress on development and health from an evolutionary perspective. Current mainstream models are based on the concept of “toxic stress,” and emphasize the disruptive effects of chronic exposure to stressors during development (allostatic load). An emerging alternative approach suggests that the outcomes of early stress may often represent evolved adaptations to challenging environments rather than instances of dysregulation. The webinar presents the main tenets of alternative models and their implications for health development, discusses key empirical findings, and highlights novel directions for research on this crucial topic.

From Early Adversity to Permanency: Implications for Occupational and Life Course Health Development. Year Developed: 2016. Source: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families & Communities, Maternal and Child Health Life Course Research Network (LCRN). Presenter(s): Amy Lynch, PhD, OTR/L, SCFES. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar examines the impact of early adversity and trauma upon the occupational development and success of children developing in an atypical environment - namely those who have experienced foster care and/or international adoption - including the "ripple effect" across the lifespan.

Learning Objectives:

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $225,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.