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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 13 found.

Novel Approaches to Public Health: Tech and Innovation for Supporting Public Health. Year Developed: 2017-2018. Source: Public Health Institute. Presenter(s): Sue Grinnell and others. Type: Webinar Series. Level: Introductory. Length: Series, various lengths.

Annotation: Technology is now an integral part of our every day lives, but are we leveraging it effectively in public health? Join hosts Public Health Institute (PHI) and P2Health to explore innovative approaches to solving public health problems, learn about emerging trends in technology and other innovations to support improved health, hear from startups bosWell and Bloomlife on the solutions they've devised to address health issues, and discover resources and information on technology and innovation.

Learning Objectives: • Explore innovative approaches to solving public health problems. • Learn about emerging trends in technology and other innovations to support improved health. • Hear from startups bosWell and Bloomlife on the solutions they've devised to address health issues. • Discover resources and information on technology and innovation.

2018 DMCHWD Grantee Virtual Meeting: How to Tell Your Program's Story. Year Developed: 2018. Source: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Maternal and Child Health Workforce Development. Presenter(s): Deborah Klein Walker, EdD. Type: PowerPoint Presentation. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-paced, multiple items..

Annotation: The meeting addressed how to compose and share your program's story from a high-level perspective, emphasizing effectiveness, impact, and interaction with key audiences. It also underscored the value of building and establishing relationships with decision-makers, state agencies, community organizations, and more. To highlight Dr. Klein Walker's presentation, three (3) DMCHWD grantees shared their examples during the webinar. You can view the YouTube recording of the presentation. Their slides and attachments are located on the webpage at the link in this record. The three programs were: * Leadership Education in Adolescent Health (LEAH): MCH H.O.P.E.S. (Birmingham, AL) * Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities (LEND): Cincinnati Children's Hospital (Cincinnati, OH) * Healthy Tomorrows: Clinic in the Park (Santa Ana, CA) This resource includes the meeting agenda, PowerPoint slides, transcripts, discussion notes, and other materials.

Managing Social Determinants of Health: A Framework for Identifying, Addressing Disparities in Medicaid Populations / A Conceptual and Analytical Framework for Identifying and Addressing the Social Determinants of Health in Medicaid Populations. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Health Management Associates and Disability Policy Consortium. Presenter(s): Ellen Breslin; Anissa Lambertino; Dennis Heaphy; Tony Dreyfus. Type: n.a.. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes. Slides

Annotation: Social determinants of health are increasingly recognized by Medicaid programs as important drivers of poor health outcomes and disparities that lead to higher costs. In response, Medicaid programs are beginning to analyze social determinants of health as potential causes of health disparities. During this webinar, Ellen Breslin and Anissa Lambertino of HMA, Dennis Heaphy of the Disability Policy Consortium, and independent consultant Tony Dreyfus presented an analytical framework for understanding the impact social determinants of health have on Medicaid populations. Leveraging work done by the Institute of Medicine, the framework includes measures and statistical methods that Medicaid programs, health plans, and accountable care organizations can use to generate the type of information needed to develop interventions that improve health outcomes.

Learning Objectives: • Understand why social determinants of health are key to addressing health disparities and achieving the goals of payment and delivery system reform. • Learn about the value of population-based approaches for examining the relationship between social determinants of health and health disparities. • Find out what it takes to implement the type of framework, measures and statistical methods needed to effectively examine the importance of social determinants of health on health outcomes.

CPH Study Session Webinars. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Board of Public Health Examiners. Presenter(s): Lisa Sullivan, PhD. Type: Webcast. Level: Advanced. Length: Series; various lengths.

Annotation: ASPPH hosts a series of online study sessions in January to help Certified in Public Health (CPH) candidates prepare for the CPH exam. Each study session is led by expert faculty from ASPPH member schools and programs and focuses on one of the core areas of public health: behavioral and social sciences, biostatistics, cross-cutting areas, environmental health, epidemiology, and health policy and management. Each session is two to three hours long and include lectures and interactive segments.

Addressing Infant Mortality Expert Webinar Series. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Institute for Children's Health Quality. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Webinar Series. Level: Advanced. Length: n.a..

Annotation: The multi-part webinar series is an opportunity for public health professionals to hear experts and influencers in the maternal and child health field share examples and best practices for supporting efforts to reduce infant mortality and improve maternal and infant health. Participants take away actionable insights that contribute to the goal of every child reaching his or her first birthday and beyond. Scheduled webinars are: 1. The Residual Impact of Historical Structural Inequities: Connecting Residential Segregation and Mortgage Discrimination to Current Infant Mortality and Breastfeeding Rates 7/27/2017 2. Learning from Rare Events Infant Mortality Data 8/22/17 3. The Role of State Health Leaders in Addressing Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome 8/31/17 4. Exploring State Medicaid Performance Measures, Improvement Projects, & Incentives to Promote Improvement in Women's Health Services and Perinatal Outcomes 9/18/17 5. The Prematurity Campaign Collaborative 9/25/17 6. Aligning State and Local Health Departments to Improve Maternal and Child Health 9/28/2017 7. Big Wins and Next Steps in Addressing Infant Mortality 11/15/2017

Learning Objectives: Webinar 2: 1. Determine which statistical process control (SPC) charts are most effective for small numbers and rare events data reporting and learning 2. Describe how to make and interpret SPC charts for rare events 3. Identify ways to use small numbers data to identify progress and improvement as a result of IM CoIIN activities 4. Plan how to best share and present data with small numbers to team members and stakeholders 5. Interpret the stratification of IM data (e.g. by racial groups) when it involves small numbers Webinar 3: 1. Explain primary, secondary and tertiary prevention strategies for Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome 2. Identify innovative interventions for prevention being employed by states targeting Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome 3. Describe how to work collaboratively across state and community partner to prevent Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome 4. Identify non-traditional partners that states can work with collaboratively to address Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome Webinar 5: 1. Describe the goals and structure of the March of Dimes Prematurity Campaign Collaborative 2. Identify opportunities to partner in the areas of intentionality and birth spacing, increasing access to 17 P and addressing social determinants of health 3. Explain consumer-focused communications strategies and how to get involved.

Moving the Needle on Maternal Health: Updates on Federal and State Initiatives. Year Developed: 2016. Source: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Presenter(s): William Callaghan, MD, MPH; Elliot Main, MD; Kimberly Sherman, MPH. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This DataSpeak webinar presented a look at maternal health and mortality data with a focus on how this data is collected and defined, different measurement methods, and how federal and state stakeholders are working to improve maternal health. The slide presentation, transcript and post-webinar Questions and Answers are available on the MCHB HRSA website at https://mchb.hrsa.gov/data/data-research-epidemiology/dataspeak-webinar-series

Special Instructions: DataSpeak uses a number of different technologies. To get the most out of the information, please review the technical requirements at http://hrsa.gov/archive/mchb/dataspeak/techreq/index.html

Community Violence as a Population Health Issue. Year Developed: 2016. Source: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Health and Medicine Division. Presenter(s): John Rich, Howard Pinderhughes, Charles Branas, Roberto Rodriquez, Devonne Boggan, Jeffrey Butts, Thea James, Steve Marans, John Markovic, Medina Henry. Type: Workshop. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: 21 videos; varying length.

Annotation: The Roundtable on Population Health Improvement held a one-day public workshop exploring trauma-informed approaches to community violence through a health equity lens. Participants at this workshop explored the impacts of trauma and violence on communities and explore approaches that communities and multisector partners are using to prevent violence and build safe, resilient, and healthy communities. Approaches considered included hospital and health system violence intervention programs and trauma-informed policing. Participants explored the evidence base for the effectiveness of these strategies and approaches for reducing violence in communities. The workshop showcased examples that can serve as models in different sectors and communities and share lessons learned in new and compelling ways. The welcome video is 14 minutes long.

Learning Objectives: • Explore the impacts of trauma and violence on communities. • Explore strategies and approaches that communities and multisector partners are using to prevent violence and build resilience. • Explore the evidence base for the effectiveness of these strategies and approaches for reducing the impact of violence on communities. • Provide a platform to showcase examples that can serve as models for other communities, with an explicit attention to the intersections of structural racism and structural violence

Special Instructions: Additional meeting resources including the meeting agenda, presentation slides, and attachments are available at http://nationalacademies.org/hmd/Activities/PublicHealth/PopulationHealthImprovementRT/2016-JUN-16.aspx

Collaboration and Communication in Healthcare: Principles of Interprofessional Practice. Year Developed: 2016. Source: University of California, San Francisco, Interprofessional Education Program. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate Introductory. Length: Series; varying lengths..

Annotation: Interprofessional collaborative practice is key to safe, high quality, accessible, patient-centered care. This course aims to introduce health professions learners to the fundamental principles and skills for effective interprofessional collaborative practice. This course is comprised of five modules consisting of 6-10 segments each. The five modules are available to be used consecutively or as stand-alone content. Module 1: What’s it all about? Introducing core interprofessional education concepts. (7 videos) Module 2: Who is on my team? Understanding the roles and abilities of different health professions. (6 videos) Module 3: How will our work get done? Understanding task distribution, accountability, and communication. (8 videos) Module 4: How do we tackle challenges? Conflict management and negotiation. (9 videos) Module 5: How can we work together? Leadership and membership in teams. (10 videos)

Learning Objectives: • Explore the benefits of interprofessional collaboration for patients and providers. • Discuss some of the forces that are moving healthcare towards greater interprofessional collaboration. • Describe the roles and scope of practice for different healthcare professionals Introduce key skills to enhance communication, collaboration and conflict management. • Explore team leadership and membership.

Partnering in the Title V Block Grant Process. Year Developed: 2015. Source: National Center for Family Professional Partnerships. Presenter(s): Nora Wells, Lisa Maynes, Pip Marks, Joni Bruce, Diana Autin. Type: Video Webinar. Level: Advanced. Length: 64 minutes. List of training webinars

Annotation: Title V needs family involvement to strengthen the Block Grant. In this webinar, a panel of family leaders from three states--California, Oklahoma, and Vermont--shared their organizations' involvement in the Block Grant process and detail their paths to partnership with their state Title V, sharing tips and lessons learned along the way for building this important relationship. The list of training webinars provides a link to the slides and 5 handouts for this presentation.

Enhancing Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) Surveillance and Partnerships to Reach Special Populations in Four States. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Presenter(s): Eirian Coronado, MA; Indu Ahluwalia, MPH, PhD; Kathy Burke, MSW; Leslie Harrison, MPH. Type: Video Conference. Level: Introductory. Length: 62 minutes.

Annotation: In 2012, the CDC Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) began a multiyear collaboration with the W.K. Kellogg Foundation (WKKF) to expand PRAMS surveillance in four states with WKKF funded initiatives. During this Workshop, CDC‐PRAMS, Mississippi and New Mexico, share examples of partner engagement, and describe innovations that have been developed to enhance PRAMS data collection efforts among minority and low‐income women as part of the WKKF collaboration.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.