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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 28 found.

Novel Approaches to Public Health: Tech and Innovation for Supporting Public Health. Year Developed: 2017-2018. Source: Public Health Institute. Presenter(s): Sue Grinnell and others. Type: Webinar Series. Level: Introductory. Length: Series, various lengths.

Annotation: Technology is now an integral part of our every day lives, but are we leveraging it effectively in public health? Join hosts Public Health Institute (PHI) and P2Health to explore innovative approaches to solving public health problems, learn about emerging trends in technology and other innovations to support improved health, hear from startups bosWell and Bloomlife on the solutions they've devised to address health issues, and discover resources and information on technology and innovation.

Learning Objectives: • Explore innovative approaches to solving public health problems. • Learn about emerging trends in technology and other innovations to support improved health. • Hear from startups bosWell and Bloomlife on the solutions they've devised to address health issues. • Discover resources and information on technology and innovation.

Health Equity Guide Webinar Series. Year Developed: 2017-2018. Source: Human Impact Partners. Presenter(s): Linda Rae Murray, Rebekah Gowler, Deborah Garneau, Shawna Davie, Matias Valenzuela, Jordan Bingham, Evonda Smith, Sandi Galvez, Rex Archer, Lili Farhang, Andy Wessel, Jeanne Ayers. Type: Webinar Series. Level: Advanced. Length: 255 minutes.

Annotation: This 4-part webinar series brings together national experts and local health departments to discuss their work to advance health equity. Each webinar focuses on a set of strategic practices that health departments can take to pursue a wall-to-wall transformation of how they work internally, with communities, and alongside other government agencies.

Getting Our House in Order: Addressing Internal Racial Equity. Year Developed: 2019. Source: CityMatch. Presenter(s): Jessica Ehule; Ann Novias; Janet Jones;. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 91 minutes.

Annotation: The desire to achieve equity drives the reason why many of us work in the field of maternal and child health. Racial inequities are evident in health outcomes across the board. In addressing these disparities, organizations often neglect to assess how they may be contributing to the racial inequities we work so hard to eliminate. We are working within a system founded on principles to advance specific groups of people, while leaving others behind. This foundation has led to biases being present in our policies, procedures, and day-to-day interactions. The webinar features CityMatCH members Janet Jones of the Waco-McLennan County Public Health District, Ana Novais of the Rhode Island Department of Health, and Jessica Ehule, CityMatCH staff member. Join CityMatCH’s Equity Action group and CityLeaders Cohort 12 as we discuss the strategies used by these agencies to actualize racial equity with discussion about how leaders can be impactful in this work.

Emerging Leaders in Public Health: Transformative Change through Health Equity at the Local Level. Year Developed: 2018. Source: CityMatCH. Presenter(s): Janet Suttie; Julian Drix; Margaret Reid. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 59 minutes.

Annotation: In 2014, the Kresge Foundation launched a new initiative to equip local public health officers with the knowledge and skills to lead in today’s changing health care environment. Many grantees have decided to take a health equity approach to transforming the role of the local health department. This webinar informs attendees of the overarching goals of the Emerging Leaders in Public Health program, and showcases the work of two local health departments transforming their role in the community through a health equity lens.

Learning Objectives: • Learn how reframing the role of the health department may lead to transformative change within the community • Learn how communities are using ELPH program to address health equity and health factors that directly impact the community • Be provided with information for applying to the next cohort of the Emerging Leaders in Public Health Program

Community Development as a Partner for Health Equity. Year Developed: 2018. Source: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families & Communities, Maternal and Child Health Life Course Research Network (LCRN). Presenter(s): Douglas Jutte, MD, MPH; Daniel Lau, MPH. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 15 minutes.

Annotation: Through this webinar, the Build Healthy Places Network provides an overview of the community development sector, a multi-billion-dollar sector that serves as an action arm for addressing social determinants of health through the development and financing of affordable housing, grocery stores, community centers, health clinics, and services in low- and moderate-income communities. The overview focuses on the sector’s alignment with the health equity goals of public health, shared measurement strategies, and emerging opportunities for cross-sector collaboration.

Special Instructions: This link goes to a preview; to view the full video, download it or add it to your dropbox.

Changing the Public Conversation on Health: How to Use Framing to "Decode" Social Determinants and Health Equity. Year Developed: 2018. Source: CityMatCH. Presenter(s): Andy Wessel, MPH. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 80 minutes.

Annotation: Despite the foundational role that health plays in everyone's quality of life, the field of public health is not well understood by the general public and decision-makers. This webinar describes how the Douglas County Health Department in Omaha is applying research from FrameWorks Institute and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to build stronger support for prevention and equity approaches.

Learning Objectives: • Why our messages frequently fail to translate the importance of public health to people outside the field. • How to use well-researched values and explanatory metaphors to "decode" our work on social determinants and health equity. • Why "naked numbers" are problematic and how "social math" can help our audience better understand the significance of data • How these framing practices can be applied to MCH advocacy.

Using Geographic Information Science to Advance Heath Equity and Environmental Justice. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Region 2 Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): Andrew Maroko, PhD. Type: Webcast. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: n.a..

Annotation: Environmental factors have an important impact on the health of communities. Public health professionals may use geographic information sciences (GIS) to assess the health of communities by analyzing exposure, or being subjected to negative factors such as pollution, as well as accessibility, or the ability to access positive factors such as green space and healthy food. In this webinar, Dr. Andrew Maroko discusses the process of geovisualization, hypothesis generation, data exploration, and communication and knowledge transfer in conducting environmental justice research. Dr. Maroko also describes various methods and technologies used to estimate exposure and accessibility, and provides examples of GIS in environmental justice/health equity projects in New York City and Glasgow, Scotland.

Learning Objectives: • To describe how geographic information science can be used to advance health equity and environmental justice. • To describe the environmental factors that lead to health disparities. • To list examples of how geographic information science has been used in health equity research.

Special Instructions: Registration required before accessing this course.

Continuing Education: CHES, CPHCE

Training for Health Equity in the Context of Public Health 3.0. Year Developed: 2017. Source: HRSA, Bureau of Health Workforce, Division of Nursing and Public Health. Presenter(s): Jaques Colon. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Advanced. Length: 68 minutes.

Learning Objectives: • Learn about the root causes of health inequity. • Discuss strategic practices to address those root causes. • Identify skills needed in your state and implications for training.

Special Instructions: Requires Adobe Flash

State Approaches to Addressing Health Disparities. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Conference of State Legislatures and Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. Presenter(s): Shavon Arline-Bradley; Jim Abeler, Sarah Hernandez. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 58 minutes.

Annotation: Health disparities—differences in health and health care experienced by groups based on social, economic and environmental factors—persist across the nation. Each year, health disparities lead to significant human and financial costs, as certain people experience poorer living conditions, worse health status and treatment outcomes, and more difficulty accessing health care services than their peers in other population groups. State legislators have pursued various policy approaches to reduce health disparities in their communities and states. Through legislative tracking, NCSL has identified multiple strategies being pursued by states, including increasing workforce diversity, improving cultural competence in health care services and addressing the social determinants of health. This webinar, sponsored by NCSL and the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, discusses why state policymakers may consider addressing health disparities, and explore state policy approaches and examples.

Maternal Health in Crisis: Ensuring Nationwide Access to Maternity Care Providers. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs and NIHCM Foundation. Presenter(s): Ashlyn Christianson, Katy Kozhimannil PhD, Mallory Schwarz. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: Nearly half of all U.S. counties lack a practicing OB-GYN, and the shortage is expected to grow, with projections showing as many as 8,800 fewer OB-GYNs practicing than will be needed in 2020. Maternity workforce shortages and maldistribution are of particular concern for the Medicaid program, which covers about half of all births in the U.S. Meanwhile, American women are dying from pregnancy-related complications at a higher rate than in any other developed country—a problem that’s exacerbated by limited access to providers.

Learning Objectives: • Understand the dynamics behind maternity workforce challenges, particularly in rural and other underserved areas; • Learn an example of a public-private collaboration to connect Medicaid mothers-to-be with prenatal care and resources like transportation to doctor visits; • Describe how financial incentives can be used to encourage medical professionals to specialize in maternal health and to work in underserved areas.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.