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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 19 found.

Strengthening Skills For Health Equity: Pennsylvania's Health Equity Committee. Year Developed: 2021. Source: National MCH Workforce Development Center. Presenter(s): Syrai Harrel, MSHE, PHPA and Aerielle Waters, MPH, PHPA. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 20 minutes.

Annotation: This video describes Pennsylvania's Title V equity work as part of the National MCH Workforce Development Center's Strengthening Skills for Health Equity Skills Institute held remotely in March 2021. Pennsylvania has developed a Health Equity Committee to increase Title V's capacity to achieve health equity in the design, development, and implementation of public health programs, services, and systems. This committee encourages training, buy-in, tools for technical assistance and a health equity plan.

Social Determinants of Health: Challenges and Opportunities in Rural America. Year Developed: 2020. Source: Rural Health Research Gateway. Presenter(s): Jan Probst, PhD. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes. direct you tube link

Annotation: Social determinants of health are defined by the World Health Organization as "the conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work, and age". For rural populations, many of these elements are less favorable than within urban areas. Building on work conducted by the Rural and Minority Health Research Center, this presentation reviews some of the key elements associated with health across rural White and minority populations, such as education, income, and health facility availability.

Learning Objectives: • Learn to define key terms around SDOH and rural ameria • Describe rural disparities • Understand how to plan a way forward

An MCH Reset Retreat to Determine What Matters Now. Year Developed: 2020. Source: ATMCH and MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): Janine Hill, PhD(c), MPH, ACC and Kris Risley, DrPH, CPCC. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: More retreat than webinar, this is an opportunity to unite as an MCH community. Join this archived webinar us as we quiet our minds, identify and align our priorities and values, and see the present circumstances with increased clarity and new insights about how to move forward.

Learning Objectives: • Recognize sources of stress • Identify ways to address stress • Clarify values • Identify priorities • Determine an action plan • Share renewal strategies

MCH Policy and Advocacy: A Focused Look. Year Developed: 2018. Source: University of Illinois at Chicago. Presenter(s): Arden Handler, DrPH. Type: Video. Level: Intermediate. Length: 75 minutes total, broken up into 10 short videos.

Annotation: This learning opportunity was recorded from the 2018 policy and advocacy lecture that Dr. Handler presented to her class at the University of Illinois at Chicago. It is divided in 10 short videos for ease of engagement. In the presentation, she outlines key advocacy components, the difference between case and class advocacy, and a review of policy and advocacy through the history of MCH. She explains current trends and the need for ongoing education and advocacy at national, state, and local levels. It concludes with current advocacy laws and a summary of the topic grounded in the current public health environment.

Learning Objectives: • Understand the strategic differences between advocacy and community organizing/community empowerment strategies. class issues, compromise, internal vs. external agents of change, and the difference between advocacy from the left and from the right. • Be able to to connect women and children's topics when advocating for services and discusses using children as a population group to address broader issues of social justice. • Synthesize the differences of case and class advocacy. • Become familiar with the history of advocacy related to MCH. • Understand how the advocacy process works. • Be able to use strategies in three main categories to advance MCH topic areas. • Be able to develop a plan to follow current lobbying laws appropriately.

Local Health Policy 101: Understanding Ordinances, Resolutions, and Proclamations. Year Developed: 2018. Source: Network for Public Health Law. Presenter(s): Jill Krueger, JD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 63 minutes.

Annotation: Attend this webinar, co-sponsored by the Network for Public Health Law and the National Association of Local Boards of Health (NALBOH), to learn about public health legal and policy innovations in small-town and medium-sized communities, as well as in the nation's largest cities, to address issues such as child poverty, tobacco control, environmental health and mental health. A video and slides are available.

Learning Objectives: • Describe the role of a local board of health, health department, city/ county government, and legal counsel with regard to reviewing and updating public health laws. • Explain the difference between advisory authority and policy-making authority, and how differing authority might make a resolution, proclamation, or ordinance an appropriate legal tool. • List resources for researching local public health laws and policies. • Identify examples of legal and policy innovations in the areas of child poverty, healthy eating, active living, tobacco control, environmental health, and mental health in rural, suburban, and urban communities.

Continuing Education: CLS credit may be available. Inquire to the network for details.

Health Care Transition & Title V Care Coordination Initiatives. Year Developed: 2018. Source: Got Transition. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: Series; various lengths.

Annotation: This is a five-part Webinar Series featuring examples of best practices among state Title V agencies, tools and resources, and problem-solving strategies. Titles include: (1) Starting A Transition Improvement Process Using the Six Core Elements of Health Care Transition; (2) Transition Preparation; (3) Transfer to Adult Care; (4) Integration into Adult Care; and (5) Youth, Young Adult & Parent Engagement. Recordings and handouts are available.

Learning Objectives: Session 1: • Overview of health care transition baseline results from Title V care coordination (CC) programs. • Forming a HCT quality improvement team with CC team and youth/young adults/parents. • Defining HCT pilot population, timeline, measures of success. • Selecting HCT core elements and delineating roles of CC program and YSHCN providers. Session 2: • Identifying key components of HCT policy for CC programs that families/youth want to know. • Customizing transition readiness assessment (RA) for CC programs • Piloting and disseminating HCT policy and RA. • Incorporating RA skill needs into plan of care and educating youth and families on needed skills. • Preparing medical summary and emergency care plan with youth and families and their providers. Session 3: • Identifying willing adult primary and specialty providers. • Sequencing plans for transferring young adults with multiple providers. • Identifying ways to support adult practices (consultation, care coordination). • Preparing transfer package and communicating with pediatric and adult practices. Session 4: • Ensuring welcome and orientation FAQs from the adult practice to transferring young adults and pediatric practice. • Facilitating initial appointment to adult doctor, including confirmation of receipt of transfer package. • Supporting adult practice with CC assistance from Title V and linking to adult disability resources. Session 5: • Identifying youth/young adults/parents to participate in HCT initiatives in Title V CC programs. • Providing transition education and training and mentoring opportunities. • Eliciting consumer feedback with HCT care coordination process. • Building youth/young adult/parent leadership roles on HCT within state Title V programs.

State Approaches to Addressing Health Disparities. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Conference of State Legislatures and Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. Presenter(s): Shavon Arline-Bradley; Jim Abeler, Sarah Hernandez. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 58 minutes.

Annotation: Health disparities—differences in health and health care experienced by groups based on social, economic and environmental factors—persist across the nation. Each year, health disparities lead to significant human and financial costs, as certain people experience poorer living conditions, worse health status and treatment outcomes, and more difficulty accessing health care services than their peers in other population groups. State legislators have pursued various policy approaches to reduce health disparities in their communities and states. Through legislative tracking, NCSL has identified multiple strategies being pursued by states, including increasing workforce diversity, improving cultural competence in health care services and addressing the social determinants of health. This webinar, sponsored by NCSL and the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, discusses why state policymakers may consider addressing health disparities, and explore state policy approaches and examples.

Crafting Richer Public Health Messages: Messaging and the 5 Essential Public Health Law Services. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Network for Public Health Law. Presenter(s): Scott Burris; Doug Blanke; Benjamin D. Winig. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: The 2016 Five Essential Public Health Law Services framework reflects the key scientific, legal, and advocacy activities necessary to support the timely adoption and diffusion of effective public health legal and policy interventions. The services are not all purely legal, nor are they provided only by lawyers. Instead, researchers and scientists, government officials and practitioners, and business, community, faith, and other leaders may all be involved in any given activity. The Five Essential Public Health Law Services were developed from and based upon public health law success stories, like that of tobacco control. In this webinar, the presenters explain their research over the past year exploring how this framework can be employed to more successfully advance public health law initiatives, with specific focus on preemption, housing code enforcement, and early childhood care and education. Presenters also discuss how the messaging used to advance public health laws, when crafted in a way that embraces the full range of intuitive moral values, may lead to broader community and political support for successfully developing, enacting and then enforcing new legal solutions.

Special Instructions: Slides and videos for all three parts of this series are available on the series link.

Continuing Education: Individuals may qualify for CLE credit. ASLME is an approved provider of continuing legal education credits in several states ASLME will also apply for CLE credits in other states upon request.

CPH Study Session Webinars. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Board of Public Health Examiners. Presenter(s): Lisa Sullivan, PhD. Type: Webinar. Level: Advanced. Length: Series; various lengths.

Annotation: ASPPH hosts a series of online study sessions in January to help Certified in Public Health (CPH) candidates prepare for the CPH exam. Each study session is led by expert faculty from ASPPH member schools and programs and focuses on one of the core areas of public health: behavioral and social sciences, biostatistics, cross-cutting areas, environmental health, epidemiology, and health policy and management. Each session is two to three hours long and include lectures and interactive segments.

Public Health Law: A Tool to Address Emerging Health Concerns. Year Developed: 2016. Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Presenter(s): Montrece McNeill Ransom, JD, MPH, Matthew Penn, JD, MLIS, Karen DeSalvo, MD, MPH, MSc. Type: n.a.. Level: Introductory. Length: n.a..

Annotation: Law is a critical tool for protecting and promoting the health of the public. Some of history's greatest public health successes, such as childhood immunization and safer workplaces, would not have been possible without changes to laws and policies. But public health law also involves evaluating laws, even ones not traditionally seen as health related, and exploring their impact on individuals and communities. Such analyses provide evidence that policymakers can use to inform future lawmaking. Increased understanding of the influence of social determinants on health has brought about innovative policy approaches including Health in All Policies. Public health law is an integral part of these initiatives and seeks to contribute to the advancement and promotion of health for all. In this session of Public Health Grand Rounds, we celebrate the 15th anniversary of CDC's Public Health Law Program. Speakers will provide an overview of public health law, describe how it is an essential component of contemporary public health practice, and discuss the emergence of modern concepts of public health law, including legal epidemiology.

Continuing Education: See course listing for CE details.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $225,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.