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2018 DMCHWD Grantee Virtual Meeting: How to Tell Your Program's Story. Year Developed: 2018. Source: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Maternal and Child Health Workforce Development. Presenter(s): Deborah Klein Walker, EdD. Type: PowerPoint Presentation. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-paced, multiple items..

Annotation: The meeting addressed how to compose and share your program's story from a high-level perspective, emphasizing effectiveness, impact, and interaction with key audiences. It also underscored the value of building and establishing relationships with decision-makers, state agencies, community organizations, and more. To highlight Dr. Klein Walker's presentation, three (3) DMCHWD grantees shared their examples during the webinar. You can view the YouTube recording of the presentation. Their slides and attachments are located on the webpage at the link in this record. The three programs were: * Leadership Education in Adolescent Health (LEAH): MCH H.O.P.E.S. (Birmingham, AL) * Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities (LEND): Cincinnati Children's Hospital (Cincinnati, OH) * Healthy Tomorrows: Clinic in the Park (Santa Ana, CA) This resource includes the meeting agenda, PowerPoint slides, transcripts, discussion notes, and other materials.

Crafting Richer Public Health Messages: Messaging and the 5 Essential Public Health Law Services. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Network for Public Health Law. Presenter(s): Scott Burris; Doug Blanke; Benjamin D. Winig. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: The 2016 Five Essential Public Health Law Services framework reflects the key scientific, legal, and advocacy activities necessary to support the timely adoption and diffusion of effective public health legal and policy interventions. The services are not all purely legal, nor are they provided only by lawyers. Instead, researchers and scientists, government officials and practitioners, and business, community, faith, and other leaders may all be involved in any given activity. The Five Essential Public Health Law Services were developed from and based upon public health law success stories, like that of tobacco control. In this webinar, the presenters explain their research over the past year exploring how this framework can be employed to more successfully advance public health law initiatives, with specific focus on preemption, housing code enforcement, and early childhood care and education. Presenters also discuss how the messaging used to advance public health laws, when crafted in a way that embraces the full range of intuitive moral values, may lead to broader community and political support for successfully developing, enacting and then enforcing new legal solutions.

Special Instructions: Slides and videos for all three parts of this series are available on the series link.

Continuing Education: Individuals may qualify for CLE credit. ASLME is an approved provider of continuing legal education credits in several states ASLME will also apply for CLE credits in other states upon request.

Storytelling as Best Practice. Year Developed: 2012. Source: American Academy of Pediatrics. Presenter(s): Andy Goodman. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 57 minutes.

Annotation: Andy Goodman addresses why storytelling is important for public health practice and how to utilize it within the field. He begins by describing why narrative is a powerful persuader and what kinds of stories help make a point. Using organizational identity, Mr. Goodman describes how to build a culture around storytelling. The presentation also highlights MCH organizations that effectively incorporate storytelling into their mission as well as on their website. A question and answer session, slides, and transcripts are available.

Learning Objectives: • Understand why storytelling is the single most powerful communication tool ever created. • Learn specific ways to use stories to advance an organization's mission.

Special Instructions: To access the presentation slides and audio, click on “Presentation Slides” and “Listen to the Recording” under “Materials.” [Note: Need Windows Media Player for audio].

Health Policy Communications. Year Developed: 2007. Source: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation . Presenter(s): Jackie Judd. Type: Video Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 15 minutes. List of all archived webinars as of 09/13, when website was closed.

Annotation: This presentation is an overview of the media and how to present information to policy-makers and journalists. Ms. Judd describes the importance of tailoring messages to different audiences and interviewers, as well as establishing rules with a reporter. The presentation also covers the basics of messaging and how to navigate different types of interviews (i.e. print/online, television, and/or radio). The components necessary for briefing decision-makers is also included.

Special Instructions: kaiserEDU.org website was closed in September 2013. Tutorials are no longer updated but due to demand by professors who are still using the tutorials in class assignments, the Kaiser Family Foundation has made them available for download on archive site.

Public Health Policy and Advocacy: Building Advocacy Skills for Social Change . Year Developed: n.a.. Source: University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Traci Toomey, PhD, MPH; Jeff Nachbar. Type: Online Course. Level: Advanced Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes. Link to all online trainings.

Annotation: This module is framed around specific professionals’ experiences of how to reach policy-makers. Differences between lobbying types and tools to advocate for social change are discussed, as well as the formal legislative process of how bills and laws are created. Legislators and representatives are also interviewed on their opinions about how to best influence policy-makers. A pre and post assessment is available.

Learning Objectives: • Define health policy and explain the importance of advocacy to make social change. • Describe the legislative process, including how a bill becomes a law. • Discuss various tools that can be used to advocate for social change at the legislative level. • Describe what influences policy makers.

Special Instructions: Registration to the University of Minnesota School of Public Health is required. For new users click here to register. Scroll down to "Public Health Policy and Advocacy: Building Advocacy Skills for Social Change". (https://cpheo1.sph.umn.edu/login/?desturl=https%3A%2F%2Fcpheo1%2Esph%2Eumn%2Eedu%2FMCLPH%2FIntroEpi%2Easp)

Continuing Education: 1 Continuing Education Hour Available

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.