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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 14 found.

2018 DMCHWD Grantee Virtual Meeting: How to Tell Your Program's Story. Year Developed: 2018. Source: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Maternal and Child Health Workforce Development. Presenter(s): Deborah Klein Walker, EdD. Type: PowerPoint Presentation. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-paced, multiple items..

Annotation: The meeting addressed how to compose and share your program's story from a high-level perspective, emphasizing effectiveness, impact, and interaction with key audiences. It also underscored the value of building and establishing relationships with decision-makers, state agencies, community organizations, and more. To highlight Dr. Klein Walker's presentation, three (3) DMCHWD grantees shared their examples during the webinar. You can view the YouTube recording of the presentation. Their slides and attachments are located on the webpage at the link in this record. The three programs were: * Leadership Education in Adolescent Health (LEAH): MCH H.O.P.E.S. (Birmingham, AL) * Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities (LEND): Cincinnati Children's Hospital (Cincinnati, OH) * Healthy Tomorrows: Clinic in the Park (Santa Ana, CA) This resource includes the meeting agenda, PowerPoint slides, transcripts, discussion notes, and other materials.

Integrating Early Childhood Data. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Conference of State Legislatures. Presenter(s): Elizabeth Dabney, Carlise King. Type: n.a.. Level: Introductory. Length: 52 minutes.

Annotation: Data from both the early childhood and K–12 sectors can help policymakers inform policy discussions and funding decisions; chart the progress of children, programs, and the state; strengthen and support the early childhood workforce; and pinpoint best practices and areas of need. Linking limited, but critical, early childhood and K–12 data can help states know whether policies and programs successfully transition children from early childhood to the classroom and get them ready for school. During the webinar hear from the Early Childhood Data Collaborative and Data Quality Campaign about how state legislators and policymakers can support the linkage and use of early childhood and K-12 data to inform policy and improve child outcomes.

Crafting Richer Public Health Messages: Messaging and the 5 Essential Public Health Law Services. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Network for Public Health Law. Presenter(s): Scott Burris; Doug Blanke; Benjamin D. Winig. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: The 2016 Five Essential Public Health Law Services framework reflects the key scientific, legal, and advocacy activities necessary to support the timely adoption and diffusion of effective public health legal and policy interventions. The services are not all purely legal, nor are they provided only by lawyers. Instead, researchers and scientists, government officials and practitioners, and business, community, faith, and other leaders may all be involved in any given activity. The Five Essential Public Health Law Services were developed from and based upon public health law success stories, like that of tobacco control. In this webinar, the presenters explain their research over the past year exploring how this framework can be employed to more successfully advance public health law initiatives, with specific focus on preemption, housing code enforcement, and early childhood care and education. Presenters also discuss how the messaging used to advance public health laws, when crafted in a way that embraces the full range of intuitive moral values, may lead to broader community and political support for successfully developing, enacting and then enforcing new legal solutions.

Special Instructions: Slides and videos for all three parts of this series are available on the series link.

Continuing Education: Individuals may qualify for CLE credit. ASLME is an approved provider of continuing legal education credits in several states ASLME will also apply for CLE credits in other states upon request.

The Tool for Sharing Best Practices. Year Developed: 2016. Source: National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools. Presenter(s): Lisa Mwaikambo, MPH. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 58 minutes. presentation slides

Annotation: The Tool for Sharing Best Practices helps public health professionals by outlining five practical steps to share best practices throughout their organizations. Sharing best practices can help your organization learn from successes, replicate successful programs, and improve outcomes.

Mental Health-Focused Methods and Tools to Support Evidence-Informed Decision Making. Year Developed: 2016. Source: National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools. Presenter(s): Susan Snelling, PhD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Advanced Introductory. Length: 90 minutes. presentation slides

Annotation: This webinar on evidence-informed decision-making (EIDM) draws on The National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools (NCCMT)'s seven-step process, with reference to methods and tools for each step that are specific to mental health practice. The National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools (NCCMT) is one of six National Collaborating Centres for Public Health in Canada with a collective mandate to strengthen public health in the country.

Engaging Senior Leadership in Your Quality Improvement (QI) Work. Year Developed: 2016. Source: National Institute for Children's Health Quality and Public Health Quality Improvement Exchange. Presenter(s): Megan Johnson MSc, Ty Kane MPH. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 61 minutes.

Annotation: Even in cases when leaders are supportive and enthusiastic, the right tools and proper framing of the work can lead to higher engagement, which can result in a successful, long-term change. This webinar recording provides strategies to engage senior leaders in quality improvement work.

Writing Briefing Memos. Year Developed: 2012. Source: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women’s and Children’s Health Policy Center. Presenter(s): Marjory Ruderman, MHS. Type: Video Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 15 minutes.

Annotation: This presentation focuses on the nature, elements and specific uses of briefing memos, and tips for writing good ones. By comparing memo writing to the Ikea business model, Ms. Ruderman discusses solutions to writing an effective memo, including using clear visual cues and logical paths, focusing on the memo’s purpose, avoiding jargon, simplifying sentence structure, and presenting and concluding data effectively.

Learning Objectives: • Understand what a briefing memo is and why you would write one. • Describe the IKEA Effect. • Learn how to present data effectively.

Storytelling as Best Practice. Year Developed: 2012. Source: American Academy of Pediatrics. Presenter(s): Andy Goodman. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 57 minutes.

Annotation: Andy Goodman addresses why storytelling is important for public health practice and how to utilize it within the field. He begins by describing why narrative is a powerful persuader and what kinds of stories help make a point. Using organizational identity, Mr. Goodman describes how to build a culture around storytelling. The presentation also highlights MCH organizations that effectively incorporate storytelling into their mission as well as on their website. A question and answer session, slides, and transcripts are available.

Learning Objectives: • Understand why storytelling is the single most powerful communication tool ever created. • Learn specific ways to use stories to advance an organization's mission.

Special Instructions: To access the presentation slides and audio, click on “Presentation Slides” and “Listen to the Recording” under “Materials.” [Note: Need Windows Media Player for audio].

Writing Policy Briefs: A Guide to Translating Science and Engaging Stakeholders. Year Developed: 2011. Source: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women’s and Children’s Health Policy Center. Presenter(s): Marjory Ruderman, MHS. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Introductory Advanced. Length: 18 minutes.

Annotation: The challenges, art and craft of writing documents intended to translate science to action (policy, programs, services) are the subjects of this distance education module. While the primary intended audiences are public health students and practicing professionals, faculty at public health and other MCH training and education programs may find useful tools in this module. Learning objectives give emphasis to basic elements and structure of policy briefs, and to skills development in synthesizing data and information in order to communicate effectively with non-science audiences. The module offers an introductory lecture, examples of the skills in action, and structured exercises for completing the process of writing your own policy brief.

Learning Objectives: • Understand the basic elements of a policy brief. • Identify the information needs of different audiences. • Synthesize data to convey policy implications. • Craft concise language. • Organize information effectively.

Special Instructions: To access video, click “Play Lecture” next to “A. Video Lecture: The Art and Craft of Policy Briefs.”

MCH and Chronic Disease Prevention: Policy, Science, and Opportunities (Capacity Building Webinar #5). Year Developed: 2011. Source: National Association of County and City Health Officials, CityMatCH. Presenter(s): Kenneth Smith, PhD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: 81minutes.

Annotation: In this webinar, part of the Emerging Issues in Maternal and Child Health Series, the presenter explains the Policy, Systems, and Environmental (PSE) change approach in chronic disease prevention and MCH. Specific examples are given related to the home visitation program.

Learning Objectives: • Define policy, systems, and environmental (PSE) change. • Explain the framework, rationale, and opportunities for using the PSE approach in chronic disease and MCH. • Participate in an interactive discussion session to explore how the PSE approach can be used in MCH, and specifically in a home visitation program.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.