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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 10 found.

A New Approach to Assessing Family Engagement in Health Care Systems. Year Developed: 2019. Source: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health. Presenter(s): Beth Dworetzky; Nanfi Lubogo; Susan Chacon. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Health care providers, payers, and systems serving children, youth and families increasingly focus on family engagement as a strategy to improve health care delivery, enhance consumer and provider satisfaction, and reduce costs. Assessing how well an organization or agency is engaging families is a critical step in achieving these goals. A recent issue brief from Family Voices, A Framework for Assessing Family Engagement in Systems Change, proposes four domains of family engagement – representation, transparency, impact and commitment. Join us as we explore this framework, share models of success and discuss common barriers to incorporating meaningful family engagement in systems-level initiatives. It is recommended that attendees read the issue brief prior to the event.

From Chaos to Collaboration: Discovering Consensus Among Competing Interests. Year Developed: 2018. Source: National Conference of State Legislatures. Presenter(s): Larry Schooler. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: 50 minutes.

Annotation: Legislators and staff are often faced with the challenge of making decisions, or helping to make decisions, that satisfies diverse constituencies with competing interests. In this webinar, participants learned about both the art and science behind finding consensus to address challenging public policy issues by exploring effective methods and proven techniques that produce agreement to policy challenges. Participants received with new tools and skills for creating consensus among diverse interest groups.

A Conversation on Meaningful Family Engagement, from Clinical Care to Health Policy. Year Developed: 2018. Source: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health. Presenter(s): Rylin Rodgers; Richard Antonelli, MD; Ruth E. K. Stein, MD, FAAP. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Engaging with families is vital to transforming the health care system and positively impacting the life course of vulnerable populations. Families have extensive experience in partnering with professionals to improve systems of care, are organized and connected across the country, and stand ready to assist at every level of next efforts for improvement. Learn how to meaningfully involve families at every level of health care systems and engage them as critical partners in designing policies that will improve care for all children. Discussing, Families of Children with Medical Complexity: A View from the Front Lines, the lead author and experts in the field reviewed the article’s key content and shared thoughts on the implications of its recommendations. A video and presentation slides are available.

Maternal Health in Crisis: Ensuring Nationwide Access to Maternity Care Providers. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs and NIHCM Foundation. Presenter(s): Ashlyn Christianson, Katy Kozhimannil PhD, Mallory Schwarz. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: Nearly half of all U.S. counties lack a practicing OB-GYN, and the shortage is expected to grow, with projections showing as many as 8,800 fewer OB-GYNs practicing than will be needed in 2020. Maternity workforce shortages and maldistribution are of particular concern for the Medicaid program, which covers about half of all births in the U.S. Meanwhile, American women are dying from pregnancy-related complications at a higher rate than in any other developed country—a problem that’s exacerbated by limited access to providers.

Learning Objectives: • Understand the dynamics behind maternity workforce challenges, particularly in rural and other underserved areas; • Learn an example of a public-private collaboration to connect Medicaid mothers-to-be with prenatal care and resources like transportation to doctor visits; • Describe how financial incentives can be used to encourage medical professionals to specialize in maternal health and to work in underserved areas.

When Public Health Goes to Court: Judicial Structure and Functions. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Network for Public Health Law. Presenter(s): David T. Emerson, Lorre Cuzze, JD, MPH; Tina Batra Hershey, JD, MPH; Kerri McGowan Lowrey, JD, MPH. Type: Webcast. Level: Advanced. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar examines the structure and essential functions of the state and federal court systems, including administrative courts, explores the Tribal court system, and describes the role of court watch programs in addressing public health issues.

Continuing Education: CLEs are available for some attendees.

Achieving Health Equity: Addressing Racism as a Threat to the Health and Well-being of our Nation. Year Developed: 2012. Source: Michigan Public Health Training Center and the Genesee County Health Department. Presenter(s): Camara Jones, MD, MPH, PhD. Type: Webcast. Level: Introductory. Length: 110 minutes.

Annotation: This presentation equips public health workers with tools for motivating, initiating, and sustaining work to address health equity. These tools include the “Cliff Analogy” animation which distills three levels of health intervention; a definition of racism which can be generalized to become a definition of any structured inequity; the “Gardener’s Tale” allegory which illustrates and encourages discussion about three levels of racism; data on the relationship between “socially assigned race” and self-rated health; a three-part definition of health equity including what it is, how to achieve it, and how it relates to health disparities; and information on an international anti-racism treaty which can serve as a platform for action.

Learning Objectives: • Describe the relationship between medical care, secondary prevention, primary prevention, addressing the social determinants of health, and addressing the social determinants of equity using the “Cliff Analogy.” • Define racism, and distinguish three levels of racism using the "Gardener's Tale" allegory. • Describe the relationship between “socially-assigned race” and self-rated general health status on the 2004 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. • Identify the status of the United States with regard to the International Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Racial Discrimination.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account. Mac users need to download Silverlight to view.

Bloomberg Leadership Series: The Art of Science Advice to Policy Makers. Year Developed: 2008. Source: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Harvey Fineberg, MD, PhD. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Advanced. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Dr. Harvey Fineberg discusses his experiences with leadership and describes how his early career helped shape his evolution as a leader in public health, including roles as Dean of the Harvard School of Public Health and as the President of the Institute of Medicine. Throughout the lecture, he notes tips and strategies to influence and persuade policymakers. The second half of the presentation consists of a question and answer session with audience members, and addresses how to grab individuals’ attention and the importance of message framing. A discussion on the differences between storytelling, social movements and best practices concludes the talk.

Health Policy and the Federal Budget. Year Developed: 2006. Source: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation . Presenter(s): Tim Westmoreland. Type: Video Webinar. Level: Intermediate Advanced Introductory. Length: 20 minutes. List of all archived webinars as of 09/13, when website was closed.

Annotation: This presentation concisely defines terms related to the federal budget, provides an overview of the budget process and discusses how this process affects health policy. After defining revenues, spending, deficit, and debt, Professor Westmoreland presents important concepts related to the budget: types of spending, baseline, limits and scorekeeping. He then explains how the budget process causes four health policy problems: 1) discretionary spending can’t keep up with health care costs; 2) long-term expenditures are discouraged by the five-year time frame for scorekeeping; 3) tax spending (deductions, credits, etc.) are not clear and unevaluated; 4) scorekeeping overprices and undervalues health benefits.

Special Instructions: kaiserEDU.org website was closed in September 2013. Tutorials are no longer updated but due to demand by professors who are still using the tutorials in class assignments, the Kaiser Family Foundation has made them available for download on archive site. To access learning opportunity, download zip file and click "player.html."

Pediatric Trauma and Disaster. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: South Central Public Health Partnership. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This online course addresses specific topics in pediatric trauma care, hospital disaster preparedness, and response for incidents involving children. The course provides an overview of early hospital responder care for pediatric trauma and disasters with an emphasis on hazards and response capabilities. The curriculum covers emergency department preparedness for receiving multiple pediatric patients, and conducting an acute assessment, diagnosis and stabilization of the severely injured child. Examples and lessons learned from responding to pediatric injuries resulting from the 2011 Alabama tornado outbreak are discussed.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account.

Continuing Education: 1 Certificate of Attendance

Pediatric Issues in Disasters and Emergencies. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: South Central Public Health Partnership. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: The purpose of this introductory course is to provide an overview of pediatric issues that should be considered before, during, and after emergencies. In this course, the definition of disaster is all-hazards; some of the topics covered include: keeping children safe from violence after a disaster, basic preparatory measures that caregivers should take in case of family separation due to disaster, and issues related to the pediatric health care system.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account.

Continuing Education: Certificate of Attendance

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.