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Displaying records 1 through 8 of 8 found.

MCH Policy and Advocacy: A Focused Look. Year Developed: 2018. Source: University of Illinois at Chicago. Presenter(s): Arden Handler, DrPH. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Advanced. Length: 75 minutes total, broken up into 10 short videos.

Annotation: This learning opportunity was recorded from the 2018 policy and advocacy lecture that Dr. Handler presented to her class at the University of Illinois at Chicago. It is divided in 10 short videos for ease of engagement. In the presentation, she outlines key advocacy components, the difference between case and class advocacy, and a review of policy and advocacy through the history of MCH. She explains current trends and the need for ongoing education and advocacy at national, state, and local levels. It concludes with current advocacy laws and a summary of the topic grounded in the current public health environment.

Learning Objectives: • Understand the strategic differences between advocacy and community organizing/community empowerment strategies. class issues, compromise, internal vs. external agents of change, and the difference between advocacy from the left and from the right. • Be able to to connect women and children's topics when advocating for services and discusses using children as a population group to address broader issues of social justice. • Synthesize the differences of case and class advocacy. • Become familiar with the history of advocacy related to MCH. • Understand how the advocacy process works. • Be able to use strategies in three main categories to advance MCH topic areas. • Be able to develop a plan to follow current lobbying laws appropriately.

A Conversation on Meaningful Family Engagement, from Clinical Care to Health Policy. Year Developed: 2018. Source: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health. Presenter(s): Rylin Rodgers; Richard Antonelli, MD; Ruth E. K. Stein, MD, FAAP. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Engaging with families is vital to transforming the health care system and positively impacting the life course of vulnerable populations. Families have extensive experience in partnering with professionals to improve systems of care, are organized and connected across the country, and stand ready to assist at every level of next efforts for improvement. Learn how to meaningfully involve families at every level of health care systems and engage them as critical partners in designing policies that will improve care for all children. Discussing, Families of Children with Medical Complexity: A View from the Front Lines, the lead author and experts in the field reviewed the article’s key content and shared thoughts on the implications of its recommendations. A video and presentation slides are available.

Influencing Change in Public and Organizational Policy in Support of Cultural Diversity and Cultural and Linguistic Competence. Year Developed: 2015. Source: National Center for Cultural Competence. Presenter(s): Diana Autin, Tawara D. Goode, Andy Imparato, Thomas Uno. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: This "Web-based Learning and Reflection" forum is designed to share examples from organizations that have recognized their own limitations in promoting cultural diversity and advancing and sustaining cultural and linguistic competence within human services, or those within the systems in which they are involved, related to the lack of cultural diversity and marginal attention that is given to fostering cultural and linguistic competence.

Learning Objectives: • Define a model of cultural competence including the role of policy in its implementation. • Define linguistic competence (Goode & Jones framework). • Cite legal mandates and requirements (policy directives) for language access for individuals with limited English proficiency. • Describe three approaches to influence change in organizational and public policy that promote cultural diversity and advance and sustain cultural and linguistic competence. • Reflect on the role of leadership in bringing about such change.

Confronting Health Disparities in African American Communities. Year Developed: 2015. Source: University at Albany School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Thomas A. LaVeist, PhD. Type: Video. Level: Advanced. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: More than one-third of U.S. adults (over 72 million people) and 17% of U.S. children are obese; substantial differences exist in obesity prevalence by race/ethnicity, and these differences vary by sex and age. The prevalence of obesity among adults from 2007-2010 was largest among African American women compared with white and Mexican American women and men. Obesity prevalence among African American adults was the largest compared to other race ethnicity groups. Obesity increases the risk of many preventable health conditions, including heart disease, stroke and diabetes. African Americans live sicker and die younger than any other ethnic group in the nation. African Americans have the largest death rates from heart disease and stroke compared with other racial and ethnic populations. This program focuses on the reality of African-American health disparity-why it exists and the impact of environment, income and other determinants of health on the incidence of diabetes, obesity and heart disease within African American communities, and what can be done about it.

Learning Objectives: • Identify the impact of environment, income and other determinants of health on the incidence of obesity, as well as preventable diseases in African American communities • Describe community approaches for addressing health disparities in African American communities • Illustrate an example of the application of community engagement in practice.

Health Impact Reviews: A Step Toward Health Equity in All Policies. Year Developed: 2014. Source: Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Presenter(s): Christy Hoff, MPH; Sierra Rotakhina, MPH. Type: Webcast. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Representatives from the Washington State Board of Health and Governor's Interagency Council on Health Disparities discuss how they use Health Impact Reviews (HIR) to analyze how proposed legislation or budgetary changes could impact community health. The presentation provides an overview of the HIR framework and methods, a discussion of who can request an HIR, and case examples about bullying and mental health awareness bills. Presenters also discuss their outreach efforts to state legislators and their staff to increase demand for their services.

Learning Objectives: • Describe the health impact review framework and methods. • Outline the types of legislative proposals that make good candidates for a health impact review. • Describe how public health practitioners in every arena can contribute to and benefit from this work.

Policy Analysis: Selection and Analysis of Policy Alternatives and Policy Feasibility. Year Developed: 2013. Source: University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Arden Handler, DrPH. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 39 minutes.

Annotation: This presentation provides a review of two approaches to analysis of policy alternatives: 1) use of an evaluation framework; and 2) assessment of feasibility. Dr. Handler presents a sex-step process for policy analysis, providing specific guidance for each step. Particular attention is given to developing criteria for evaluation and selection. Dr. Handler’s guidance is provided in the form of sets of questions that an analyst needs to ask and answer at each step. Suggestions for locating source documentation also are provided.

Learning Objectives: • Understand the three main foci in policy analysis. • Learn how to analyze policy using and evaluative framework. • Learn how to distinguish between retrospective and prospective analyses.

Achieving Health Equity: Addressing Racism as a Threat to the Health and Well-being of our Nation. Year Developed: 2012. Source: Michigan Public Health Training Center and the Genesee County Health Department. Presenter(s): Camara Jones, MD, MPH, PhD. Type: Webcast. Level: Introductory. Length: 110 minutes.

Annotation: This presentation equips public health workers with tools for motivating, initiating, and sustaining work to address health equity. These tools include the “Cliff Analogy” animation which distills three levels of health intervention; a definition of racism which can be generalized to become a definition of any structured inequity; the “Gardener’s Tale” allegory which illustrates and encourages discussion about three levels of racism; data on the relationship between “socially assigned race” and self-rated health; a three-part definition of health equity including what it is, how to achieve it, and how it relates to health disparities; and information on an international anti-racism treaty which can serve as a platform for action.

Learning Objectives: • Describe the relationship between medical care, secondary prevention, primary prevention, addressing the social determinants of health, and addressing the social determinants of equity using the “Cliff Analogy.” • Define racism, and distinguish three levels of racism using the "Gardener's Tale" allegory. • Describe the relationship between “socially-assigned race” and self-rated general health status on the 2004 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. • Identify the status of the United States with regard to the International Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Racial Discrimination.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account. Mac users need to download Silverlight to view.

MCH and Chronic Disease Prevention: Policy, Science, and Opportunities (Capacity Building Webinar #5). Year Developed: 2011. Source: National Association of County and City Health Officials, CityMatCH. Presenter(s): Kenneth Smith, PhD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: 81minutes.

Annotation: In this webinar, part of the Emerging Issues in Maternal and Child Health Series, the presenter explains the Policy, Systems, and Environmental (PSE) change approach in chronic disease prevention and MCH. Specific examples are given related to the home visitation program.

Learning Objectives: • Define policy, systems, and environmental (PSE) change. • Explain the framework, rationale, and opportunities for using the PSE approach in chronic disease and MCH. • Participate in an interactive discussion session to explore how the PSE approach can be used in MCH, and specifically in a home visitation program.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.