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Displaying records 1 through 9 of 9 found.

Evidence Insight Video Series. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Mathematica Policy Research. Presenter(s): Ann Person, Phil Killewald, Alex Resch, Mariel Finucane, Lauren Vollmer. Type: Webinar Series. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: 5 videos, self paced.

Annotation: In a world where data are proliferating as never before, more policymakers are relying on research evidence to serve the public good. What are the research methods that offer the most useful data to policymakers in this rapidly changing landscape? Find out in #EvidenceInsight, a new video series from Mathematica Policy Research. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are considered the gold standard of rigorous research design. For decades, Mathematica researchers have designed, executed, and replicated large-scale RCTs in many different policy and program areas. Today, greater availability of high quality administrative data—along with an abundance of emerging technologies—have increased demand for faster program evaluation with equally robust results. This demand, coupled with shrinking resources, has motivated researchers to consider new methods that are more efficient and less expensive than RCTs, but just as reliable. This video series is designed to help policymakers who need access to strong evidence. After a brief video describing the series, additional videos address these topics: Bayesian Methods: A Faster, Probabilistic Approach to Research Design. Adaptive Randomization: A Fresh Perspective on Traditional Research Design. Rapid-Cycle Evaluation: Determining What Works in Less Time. Predictive Analytics: Transforming Decision Making in Three Steps.

Race, Language and Ethnicity Data Collection. Year Developed: 2014. Source: National Center for Family Professional Partnerships. Presenter(s): Julie Lucero, PhD, MPH. Type: Webcast. Level: Introductory. Length: 58 minutes. Slides

Annotation: Collection of Race/Ethnicity and Language (REL) data data is important to tracking progress of health disparities across populations. Health disparities impact individual and family well-being throughout the United States by compounding and intersecting with traumatic life conditions such as the chronic strain of poverty and marginalization. The presentation included a brief history of health disparities and race/ethnicity categories; a description of why REL data are collected; and how to ask the questions.

The Role and Use of Evidence in Policy. Year Developed: 2013 est.3.. Source: Wisconsin Center for Public Health Education and Training. Presenter(s): Elizabeth Feder, PhD. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: 120 minutes.

Annotation: This course focuses on how public health professionals can better promote the use of their own work in policy discussions. Participants will explore how evidence is used in policy-making, and how sometimes policy decisions are made despite contrary evidence. The use of evidence may vary, depending upon the political process, so participants will consider several theoretical models of the policy process and what they imply about the use of evidence. This training also addresses how to improve evidence use and the role of knowledge brokers as well as how to frame messages for different audiences.

Learning Objectives: • Describe how evidence is used in policy making. • Identify how the use of evidence in policy making can be improved. • Discover ways in which you can better promote the use of your work in the policy discussions.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Using the Evidence-Based Public Health Framework to Move Policy Forward . Year Developed: 2011. Source: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. Presenter(s): Dr. Ross Brownson. Type: Webcast. Level: Introductory. Length: 20-25 minutes.

Annotation: Dr. Brownson is a Professor of Epidemiology at Washington University in St. Louis. Dr. Brownson is the author of six books and over 280 peer-reviewed articles. His books include Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control, Applied Epidemiology, Handbook of Obesity Prevention, Communicating Public Health Information Effectively: A Guide for Practitioners, and Evidence-Based Public Health.

Learning Objectives: • Understand how the seven-stage EBPH framework can inform evidence-based policies. • Learn how to enhance evidence based public health through the EBPH framework.

Special Instructions: This course provider requires additional registration and/or a fee outside of TRAIN. Click on the 'Go to Step 2 of Registration' button to add this course to 'My Learning' and proceed to the course provider's website.

MCH and Chronic Disease Prevention: Policy, Science, and Opportunities (Capacity Building Webinar #5). Year Developed: 2011. Source: National Association of County and City Health Officials, CityMatCH. Presenter(s): Kenneth Smith, PhD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: 81minutes.

Annotation: In this webinar, part of the Emerging Issues in Maternal and Child Health Series, the presenter explains the Policy, Systems, and Environmental (PSE) change approach in chronic disease prevention and MCH. Specific examples are given related to the home visitation program.

Learning Objectives: • Define policy, systems, and environmental (PSE) change. • Explain the framework, rationale, and opportunities for using the PSE approach in chronic disease and MCH. • Participate in an interactive discussion session to explore how the PSE approach can be used in MCH, and specifically in a home visitation program.

How Can Use of the Performance Standards Drive National, State and Local Public Health Policy?. Year Developed: 2008. Source: Alabama Public Health Training Network. Presenter(s): Laura Landrum, MUPP; Judy Monroe, MD; F. Douglas Scutchfield, MD. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Advanced. Length: 85 minutes.

Annotation: Ms. Landrum begins by discussing “Performance Standards as Good Policy”. She focuses on 4 standards to improve the quality of public health practice and performance and continues by focusing on the history and key concepts of the CDC’s National Public Health Performance Standards Program (NPHPSP). The 10 essential public health services are addressed, as well as reasons to use NPHPSP and specific examples of various States’ use of performance improvement. Dr. Monroe continues next addressing user’s perspective and lessons learned from employing the national performance measures. Dr. Scutchfield concludes the lecture by discussing research objectives, methods, and findings from Public Health Systems research on system and community characteristics influence on public health performance.

Learning Objectives: • Learn key data findings from the research into the NPHPSP. • Discuss how the NPHPSP has incorporated language into legislation for state health improvement planning.

Special Instructions: To access the video, scroll down on the landing page to the “View Program” gray box and choose a player to open the presentation. [Note: Need Real Player or Windows Media Player to watch].

Bloomberg Leadership Series: The Art of Science Advice to Policy Makers. Year Developed: 2008. Source: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Harvey Fineberg, MD, PhD. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Advanced. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Dr. Harvey Fineberg discusses his experiences with leadership and describes how his early career helped shape his evolution as a leader in public health, including roles as Dean of the Harvard School of Public Health and as the President of the Institute of Medicine. Throughout the lecture, he notes tips and strategies to influence and persuade policymakers. The second half of the presentation consists of a question and answer session with audience members, and addresses how to grab individuals’ attention and the importance of message framing. A discussion on the differences between storytelling, social movements and best practices concludes the talk.

Health Policy and the Federal Budget. Year Developed: 2006. Source: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation . Presenter(s): Tim Westmoreland. Type: Video Webinar. Level: Intermediate Advanced Introductory. Length: 20 minutes. List of all archived webinars as of 09/13, when website was closed.

Annotation: This presentation concisely defines terms related to the federal budget, provides an overview of the budget process and discusses how this process affects health policy. After defining revenues, spending, deficit, and debt, Professor Westmoreland presents important concepts related to the budget: types of spending, baseline, limits and scorekeeping. He then explains how the budget process causes four health policy problems: 1) discretionary spending can’t keep up with health care costs; 2) long-term expenditures are discouraged by the five-year time frame for scorekeeping; 3) tax spending (deductions, credits, etc.) are not clear and unevaluated; 4) scorekeeping overprices and undervalues health benefits.

Special Instructions: kaiserEDU.org website was closed in September 2013. Tutorials are no longer updated but due to demand by professors who are still using the tutorials in class assignments, the Kaiser Family Foundation has made them available for download on archive site. To access learning opportunity, download zip file and click "player.html."

DataSpeak Webinar Series. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: Maternal and Child Health Information Resource Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Webinar Series. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: Series; various lengths.

Annotation: This webinar series features special topics related to maternal and child health (MCH) data. Each event features one or more speakers who are considered experts in their field. The MCH Epidemiology and Statistics Program coordinates the series. The program is dedicated to the goal of helping MCH practitioners on the federal, state, and local levels to improve their capacity to gather, analyze, and use data for planning and policymaking.

Special Instructions: DataSpeak uses a number of different technologies. To get the most out of the information, please review the technical requirements at http://hrsa.gov/archive/mchb/dataspeak/techreq/index.html

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.