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How to Make Sense of Your Agency’s Data: Move from Data Collection to Analytics . Year Developed: 2018. Source: GovLoop. Presenter(s): Jack London. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Introductory. Length: 10 minutes.

Annotation: With a growing population, an increase in connected devices and the rapid pace of technological development, agencies are now collecting more data than ever before. Not to mention, the sprawl of government information systems and technologies means that agencies are also generating significant amounts of information. All that data can be extremely valuable to the way government achieves mission goals. But to reap that value, agencies must be able to do more than collect it; they must be able to analyze it. In this course, we examine the barriers that many agencies face in bridging the gap between collection and analytics. We also identify the three critical tasks that agencies must achieve to glean insights from their data. Finally, we examine how data analytics can have real impact on the operations of government agencies. The course comprises an overview, 3 lessons, a knowledge check, and a post-course survey.

Learning Objectives:

Continuing Education: GovLoop is registered with the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA) as a sponsor of continuing professional education on the National Registry of CPE Sponsors.

Overcoming the Challenges of Data Analytics in Government: Embrace Data Analytics. Year Developed: 2016. Source: GovLoop. Presenter(s): Jack London. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Introductory. Length: 30 minutes.

Annotation: This course is for anyone who wants to innovate the way their agencies gather and analyze data. It focuses on technology as well as organizational innovation to help your agency harness big data. The course lays out a roadmap to navigating data analytics and management and outlines the various opportunities of data analytics as well as the challenges of getting started. It also highlights how to select technology solutions and build your analytics expertise. The course comprises an overview, 6 lessons, a knowledge check, and a post-course survey.

Learning Objectives:

Continuing Education: GovLoop is registered with the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA) as a sponsor of continuing professional education on the National Registry of CPE Sponsors.

Data Analytics Fundamentals: Learn to Use Your Data. Year Developed: 2016. Source: GovLoop. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Introductory. Length: 30 minutes.

Annotation: Data is powerful. We can use it to shape policies; craft citizen services; and even secure government. But it takes more than data alone to drive better decision-making and ultimately better outcomes. We also need the right tools to combine that data and search for patterns, anomalies and trends that otherwise would go undetected. The course explores how to turn your data into insights, explains what data analytics is, how it’s different from big data, and – most importantly – how it can impact government operations and citizen services. Then, it discusses how to get the most out of your data by walking through some common challenges to data success and then matching those challenges to cultural and technical solutions. To help us with some of the technical lingo, we also hear from expert, Melissa Fields, Solutions Architect at ClearShark – an industry leader in providing customized, integrated and managed IT solutions to government. The course comprises an overview, 6 lessons,2 interactive segments, and a post-course survey.

Learning Objectives:

Continuing Education: GovLoop is registered with the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA) as a sponsor of continuing professional education on the National Registry of CPE Sponsors.

Contextualizing Guidance Workbook. Year Developed: 2016. Source: National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools. Presenter(s): Elizabeth Alverex, MD, MPH; John Lavis, MD, MSC, PHD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 70 minutes. presentation slides

Annotation: The Contextualizing Guidance Workbook can help professionals consider factors from the broader health system and political system so you make the most appropriate policy recommendations and decisions.

Race, Language and Ethnicity Data Collection. Year Developed: 2014. Source: National Center for Family Professional Partnerships. Presenter(s): Julie Lucero, PhD, MPH. Type: Webcast. Level: Introductory. Length: 58 minutes. Slides

Annotation: Collection of Race/Ethnicity and Language (REL) data data is important to tracking progress of health disparities across populations. Health disparities impact individual and family well-being throughout the United States by compounding and intersecting with traumatic life conditions such as the chronic strain of poverty and marginalization. The presentation included a brief history of health disparities and race/ethnicity categories; a description of why REL data are collected; and how to ask the questions.

Using the Evidence-Based Public Health Framework to Move Policy Forward . Year Developed: 2011. Source: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. Presenter(s): Dr. Ross Brownson. Type: Webcast. Level: Introductory. Length: 20-25 minutes.

Annotation: Dr. Brownson is a Professor of Epidemiology at Washington University in St. Louis. Dr. Brownson is the author of six books and over 280 peer-reviewed articles. His books include Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control, Applied Epidemiology, Handbook of Obesity Prevention, Communicating Public Health Information Effectively: A Guide for Practitioners, and Evidence-Based Public Health.

Learning Objectives: • Understand how the seven-stage EBPH framework can inform evidence-based policies. • Learn how to enhance evidence based public health through the EBPH framework.

Special Instructions: This course provider requires additional registration and/or a fee outside of TRAIN. Click on the 'Go to Step 2 of Registration' button to add this course to 'My Learning' and proceed to the course provider's website.

MCH and Chronic Disease Prevention: Policy, Science, and Opportunities (Capacity Building Webinar #5). Year Developed: 2011. Source: National Association of County and City Health Officials, CityMatCH. Presenter(s): Kenneth Smith, PhD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: 81minutes.

Annotation: In this webinar, part of the Emerging Issues in Maternal and Child Health Series, the presenter explains the Policy, Systems, and Environmental (PSE) change approach in chronic disease prevention and MCH. Specific examples are given related to the home visitation program.

Learning Objectives: • Define policy, systems, and environmental (PSE) change. • Explain the framework, rationale, and opportunities for using the PSE approach in chronic disease and MCH. • Participate in an interactive discussion session to explore how the PSE approach can be used in MCH, and specifically in a home visitation program.

Bloomberg Leadership Series: The Art of Science Advice to Policy Makers. Year Developed: 2008. Source: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Harvey Fineberg, MD, PhD. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Advanced. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Dr. Harvey Fineberg discusses his experiences with leadership and describes how his early career helped shape his evolution as a leader in public health, including roles as Dean of the Harvard School of Public Health and as the President of the Institute of Medicine. Throughout the lecture, he notes tips and strategies to influence and persuade policymakers. The second half of the presentation consists of a question and answer session with audience members, and addresses how to grab individuals’ attention and the importance of message framing. A discussion on the differences between storytelling, social movements and best practices concludes the talk.

Health Policy and the Federal Budget. Year Developed: 2006. Source: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation . Presenter(s): Tim Westmoreland. Type: Video Webinar. Level: Intermediate Advanced Introductory. Length: 20 minutes. List of all archived webinars as of 09/13, when website was closed.

Annotation: This presentation concisely defines terms related to the federal budget, provides an overview of the budget process and discusses how this process affects health policy. After defining revenues, spending, deficit, and debt, Professor Westmoreland presents important concepts related to the budget: types of spending, baseline, limits and scorekeeping. He then explains how the budget process causes four health policy problems: 1) discretionary spending can’t keep up with health care costs; 2) long-term expenditures are discouraged by the five-year time frame for scorekeeping; 3) tax spending (deductions, credits, etc.) are not clear and unevaluated; 4) scorekeeping overprices and undervalues health benefits.

Special Instructions: kaiserEDU.org website was closed in September 2013. Tutorials are no longer updated but due to demand by professors who are still using the tutorials in class assignments, the Kaiser Family Foundation has made them available for download on archive site. To access learning opportunity, download zip file and click "player.html."

Critical Thinking for Public Health Practice. Year Developed: 2006. Source: Upper Midwest Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This course is for public health leaders who may need to solve a problem or crisis by thinking critically about it and make appropriate decisions using an established six step model.

Learning Objectives: • Identify and clearly define a problem situation. • Gather facts about a problem situation in an efficient and effective manner. • Identify and categorize any constraints on possible solutions to a problem situation. • Employ an appropriate method to effectively generate alternative solutions to a problem situation. • Use a set of criteria (feasibility, suitability, and flexibility) to evaluate alternative solutions to a problem situation. • Develop an action plan for implementing a solution to a problem situation. • Monitor progress after implementing a solution to a problem situation to evaluate whether or not objectives are met.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.