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Displaying records 1 through 9 of 9 found.

MCH Policy and Advocacy: A Focused Look. Year Developed: 2018. Source: University of Illinois at Chicago. Presenter(s): Arden Handler, DrPH. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Advanced. Length: 75 minutes total, broken up into 10 short videos.

Annotation: This learning opportunity was recorded from the 2018 policy and advocacy lecture that Dr. Handler presented to her class at the University of Illinois at Chicago. It is divided in 10 short videos for ease of engagement. In the presentation, she outlines key advocacy components, the difference between case and class advocacy, and a review of policy and advocacy through the history of MCH. She explains current trends and the need for ongoing education and advocacy at national, state, and local levels. It concludes with current advocacy laws and a summary of the topic grounded in the current public health environment.

Learning Objectives: • Understand the strategic differences between advocacy and community organizing/community empowerment strategies. class issues, compromise, internal vs. external agents of change, and the difference between advocacy from the left and from the right. • Be able to to connect women and children's topics when advocating for services and discusses using children as a population group to address broader issues of social justice. • Synthesize the differences of case and class advocacy. • Become familiar with the history of advocacy related to MCH. • Understand how the advocacy process works. • Be able to use strategies in three main categories to advance MCH topic areas. • Be able to develop a plan to follow current lobbying laws appropriately.

Engaging Senior Leadership in Your Quality Improvement (QI) Work. Year Developed: 2016. Source: National Institute for Children's Health Quality and Public Health Quality Improvement Exchange. Presenter(s): Megan Johnson MSc, Ty Kane MPH. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 61 minutes.

Annotation: Even in cases when leaders are supportive and enthusiastic, the right tools and proper framing of the work can lead to higher engagement, which can result in a successful, long-term change. This webinar recording provides strategies to engage senior leaders in quality improvement work.

Health Impact Reviews: A Step Toward Health Equity in All Policies. Year Developed: 2014. Source: Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Presenter(s): Christy Hoff, MPH; Sierra Rotakhina, MPH. Type: Webcast. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Representatives from the Washington State Board of Health and Governor's Interagency Council on Health Disparities discuss how they use Health Impact Reviews (HIR) to analyze how proposed legislation or budgetary changes could impact community health. The presentation provides an overview of the HIR framework and methods, a discussion of who can request an HIR, and case examples about bullying and mental health awareness bills. Presenters also discuss their outreach efforts to state legislators and their staff to increase demand for their services.

Learning Objectives: • Describe the health impact review framework and methods. • Outline the types of legislative proposals that make good candidates for a health impact review. • Describe how public health practitioners in every arena can contribute to and benefit from this work.

A Public Health with Impact: The Path to What Works. Year Developed: 2014 est.. Source: National Association of County and City Health Officials. Presenter(s): Brandie Adams-Piphus, MPH. Type: Podcast. Level: Introductory. Length: 12 minutes.

Annotation: Brandie Adams-Piphus, MPH, NACCHO Senior Program Analyst, describes the role of the health department in advancing evidence-based public health and helpful resources. This podcast increases local health officials' awareness of their role in using evidence-based public health practice to prevent chronic disease and keep people healthier.

Learning Objectives: • Define evidence-based public health and the role of the LHO in evidence-based public health. • Describe how NACCHO’s Framework for Evidence-Based Decision Making and Planning can help you carry out your role in evidence-based public health. • Utilize tools and resources that can help you put NACCHO’s Framework for Evidence-Based Decision Making and Planning into practice.

Achieving Health Equity: Addressing Racism as a Threat to the Health and Well-being of our Nation. Year Developed: 2012. Source: Michigan Public Health Training Center and the Genesee County Health Department. Presenter(s): Camara Jones, MD, MPH, PhD. Type: Webcast. Level: Introductory. Length: 110 minutes.

Annotation: This presentation equips public health workers with tools for motivating, initiating, and sustaining work to address health equity. These tools include the “Cliff Analogy” animation which distills three levels of health intervention; a definition of racism which can be generalized to become a definition of any structured inequity; the “Gardener’s Tale” allegory which illustrates and encourages discussion about three levels of racism; data on the relationship between “socially assigned race” and self-rated health; a three-part definition of health equity including what it is, how to achieve it, and how it relates to health disparities; and information on an international anti-racism treaty which can serve as a platform for action.

Learning Objectives: • Describe the relationship between medical care, secondary prevention, primary prevention, addressing the social determinants of health, and addressing the social determinants of equity using the “Cliff Analogy.” • Define racism, and distinguish three levels of racism using the "Gardener's Tale" allegory. • Describe the relationship between “socially-assigned race” and self-rated general health status on the 2004 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. • Identify the status of the United States with regard to the International Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Racial Discrimination.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account. Mac users need to download Silverlight to view.

The Affordable Care Act and Children with Special Health Care Needs: An Analysis and Steps for State Policymakers. Year Developed: 2011. Source: National Academy for State Health Policy and the Catalyst Center. Presenter(s): Carol Tobias; Meg Comeau; Kathleen Farrell; Catherine Hess; Liz Fowler; Linda Peltz; Phyllis Sloyer; Steve Fitton. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Intermediate Introductory. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar focuses on the Affordable Care Act (ACA) as it relates to children with special health care needs (CSHCN) or children that are at-risk for chronic conditions that require more services than typical children. The speakers identify CSHCN-specific needs with respect to 1) universal, continuous coverage, 2) adequate coverage, and affordable coverage. For each of the three broad topics, relevant statutory and regulatory provisions are identified and explained, followed by discussion of opportunities and challenges. Steps state policymakers should consider to address needs of CSHCN in health reform are discussed. A companion report can be found at: http://www.catalystctr.org.

Achieving Health Equity through Policy, Systems and Environmental Changes. Year Developed: 2010. Source: University at Albany School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Robert Fullilove, EdD; Pamela Ferrari, RN. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Advanced. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This program highlights a public health approach that includes policy, systems and environmental changes that can significantly impact the social determinants of health and subsequently lay the groundwork to achieve health equity. It explains health disparities, health equity, and social determinants of health, giving examples as seen in community health centers. The speakers describe what policy systems and environmental changes are required for impact to be measurable as measured by a Health Impact Pyramid. Handouts of the presentation (28 slides), CE credit information, and an evaluation and post-test are provided.

Learning Objectives: • Describe the social determinants of health, the effect they have on chronic disease/diabetes and how they contribute to health disparities/inequities. • Explain the differences between health disparity and health inequity. • Understand how health equity affects every individual. • Describe the impact of public policy on vulnerable rural and urban New York State communities • Understand the policy, systems and environmental changes that impact social determinants.

Special Instructions: This training downloads onto your computer and needs RealPlayer to operate.

Continuing Education: Nursing Contact Hours, CME, and CHES credits are available. Users need to fill out an evaluation and post-test.

Role of States in Health Policy. Year Developed: 2006. Source: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Presenter(s): Alan Weil, MPP. Type: Video Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 15 minutes. List of all archived webinars as of 09/13, when website was closed.

Annotation: This presentation begins with a discussion of the state as a regulator of health insurance and health care providers and reviews the states’ role as a purchaser of health care by focusing on Medicaid. Mr. Weil provides further detail on states’ various efforts to expand coverage. The lecture continues by discussing the state as a health care provider via its provision of services to specific populations in need, including the disabled, the mentally ill and the incarcerated, as well as through federal funding for programs like Title V and breast and cervical cancer screening.

Special Instructions: kaiserEDU.org website was closed in September 2013. Tutorials are no longer updated but due to demand by professors who are still using the tutorials in class assignments, the Kaiser Family Foundation has made them available for download on archive site.

Public Health Policy and Advocacy: Building Advocacy Skills for Social Change . Year Developed: n.a.. Source: University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Traci Toomey, PhD, MPH; Jeff Nachbar. Type: Online Course. Level: Advanced Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes. Link to all online trainings.

Annotation: This module is framed around specific professionals’ experiences of how to reach policy-makers. Differences between lobbying types and tools to advocate for social change are discussed, as well as the formal legislative process of how bills and laws are created. Legislators and representatives are also interviewed on their opinions about how to best influence policy-makers. A pre and post assessment is available.

Learning Objectives: • Define health policy and explain the importance of advocacy to make social change. • Describe the legislative process, including how a bill becomes a law. • Discuss various tools that can be used to advocate for social change at the legislative level. • Describe what influences policy makers.

Special Instructions: Registration to the University of Minnesota School of Public Health is required. For new users click here to register. Scroll down to "Public Health Policy and Advocacy: Building Advocacy Skills for Social Change". (https://cpheo1.sph.umn.edu/login/?desturl=https%3A%2F%2Fcpheo1%2Esph%2Eumn%2Eedu%2FMCLPH%2FIntroEpi%2Easp)

Continuing Education: 1 Continuing Education Hour Available

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.