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MCH Needs Assessment Toolkit. Year Developed: 2019. Source: National MCH Workforce Development Center, AMCHP, and the MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This training toolkit focuses on learning opportunities and practical tools for use by the Title V workforce in understanding and implementing needs assessment, including community partnerships, data, program monitoring and evaluation, policy analysis, and principles of public health. It was developed by a collaboration of the National MCH Workforce Development Center, AMCHP, and the MCH Navigator.

What is Policy? What is the Policy-Making Process?. Year Developed: 2018. Source: University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Arden Handler, DrPH. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: 104 minutes.

Annotation: In this presentation, a recording of a course at the University of Illinois at Chicago, Dr. Handler outlines the terminology used in public policy and the types of public policy as they are practiced; the process and paradigms of making public policy, including the legislative process; and the role of economics in the policy-making process. She rounds off this lecture with an analysis of the most common public policy instruments.

MCH Policy and Advocacy: A Focused Look. Year Developed: 2018. Source: University of Illinois at Chicago. Presenter(s): Arden Handler, DrPH. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Advanced. Length: 75 minutes total, broken up into 10 short videos.

Annotation: This learning opportunity was recorded from the 2018 policy and advocacy lecture that Dr. Handler presented to her class at the University of Illinois at Chicago. It is divided in 10 short videos for ease of engagement. In the presentation, she outlines key advocacy components, the difference between case and class advocacy, and a review of policy and advocacy through the history of MCH. She explains current trends and the need for ongoing education and advocacy at national, state, and local levels. It concludes with current advocacy laws and a summary of the topic grounded in the current public health environment.

Learning Objectives: • Understand the strategic differences between advocacy and community organizing/community empowerment strategies. class issues, compromise, internal vs. external agents of change, and the difference between advocacy from the left and from the right. • Be able to to connect women and children's topics when advocating for services and discusses using children as a population group to address broader issues of social justice. • Synthesize the differences of case and class advocacy. • Become familiar with the history of advocacy related to MCH. • Understand how the advocacy process works. • Be able to use strategies in three main categories to advance MCH topic areas. • Be able to develop a plan to follow current lobbying laws appropriately.

Local Health Policy 101: Understanding Ordinances, Resolutions, and Proclamations. Year Developed: 2018. Source: Network for Public Health Law. Presenter(s): Jill Krueger, JD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 63 minutes.

Annotation: Attend this webinar, co-sponsored by the Network for Public Health Law and the National Association of Local Boards of Health (NALBOH), to learn about public health legal and policy innovations in small-town and medium-sized communities, as well as in the nation's largest cities, to address issues such as child poverty, tobacco control, environmental health and mental health. A video and slides are available.

Learning Objectives: • Describe the role of a local board of health, health department, city/ county government, and legal counsel with regard to reviewing and updating public health laws. • Explain the difference between advisory authority and policy-making authority, and how differing authority might make a resolution, proclamation, or ordinance an appropriate legal tool. • List resources for researching local public health laws and policies. • Identify examples of legal and policy innovations in the areas of child poverty, healthy eating, active living, tobacco control, environmental health, and mental health in rural, suburban, and urban communities.

Continuing Education: CLS credit may be available. Inquire to the network for details.

How to Make Sense of Your Agency’s Data: Move from Data Collection to Analytics . Year Developed: 2018. Source: GovLoop. Presenter(s): Jack London. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Introductory. Length: 10 minutes.

Annotation: With a growing population, an increase in connected devices and the rapid pace of technological development, agencies are now collecting more data than ever before. Not to mention, the sprawl of government information systems and technologies means that agencies are also generating significant amounts of information. All that data can be extremely valuable to the way government achieves mission goals. But to reap that value, agencies must be able to do more than collect it; they must be able to analyze it. In this course, we examine the barriers that many agencies face in bridging the gap between collection and analytics. We also identify the three critical tasks that agencies must achieve to glean insights from their data. Finally, we examine how data analytics can have real impact on the operations of government agencies. The course comprises an overview, 3 lessons, a knowledge check, and a post-course survey.

Learning Objectives:

Continuing Education: GovLoop is registered with the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA) as a sponsor of continuing professional education on the National Registry of CPE Sponsors.

From Chaos to Collaboration: Discovering Consensus Among Competing Interests. Year Developed: 2018. Source: National Conference of State Legislatures. Presenter(s): Larry Schooler. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: 50 minutes.

Annotation: Legislators and staff are often faced with the challenge of making decisions, or helping to make decisions, that satisfies diverse constituencies with competing interests. In this webinar, participants learned about both the art and science behind finding consensus to address challenging public policy issues by exploring effective methods and proven techniques that produce agreement to policy challenges. Participants received with new tools and skills for creating consensus among diverse interest groups.

Executive Decision Making and Liability for Public Health Officials. Year Developed: 2018. Source: Network for Public Health Law. Presenter(s): Jill Krueger, JD. Type: n.a.. Level: n.a.. Length: n.a..

Annotation: Public health officials have great discretion in carrying out their responsibilities to protect health. However, this discretion can be legally challenged by individuals, organizations, and government. A video, slides, and the decision making tool are available.

Learning Objectives: • Discretionary authority public health officials have in carrying out their duties. • Situations where use of discretion may be legally challenged. • Factors the law requires to show proof of an abuse of discretion. • Tools to assist public health decision making (the recent prosecutions of health officials for the Legionella outbreak in Flint, Michigan will serve as an example).

Continuing Education: CLS credit may be available. Inquire to the network for details.

Change Management. Year Developed: 2018. Source: National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Interactive Modules. Level: Introductory. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This online learning module from the National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools (NCCMT) provides public health leaders with an overview of areas to consider when planning organizational change.

Learning Objectives: • Learn about a model for organizational change • Discover tools that can be used for organizational assessment • Develop knowledge and skills in planning organizational change • Learn about strategies for implementing organizational change • Become familiar with process, structure and outcome indicators and their measurement

Special Instructions: Locate the module for 'Change Management' at the bottom of the list of all trainings.

2018 DMCHWD Grantee Virtual Meeting: How to Tell Your Program's Story. Year Developed: 2018. Source: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Maternal and Child Health Workforce Development. Presenter(s): Deborah Klein Walker, EdD. Type: PowerPoint Presentation. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-paced, multiple items..

Annotation: The meeting addressed how to compose and share your program's story from a high-level perspective, emphasizing effectiveness, impact, and interaction with key audiences. It also underscored the value of building and establishing relationships with decision-makers, state agencies, community organizations, and more. To highlight Dr. Klein Walker's presentation, three (3) DMCHWD grantees shared their examples during the webinar. You can view the YouTube recording of the presentation. Their slides and attachments are located on the webpage at the link in this record. The three programs were: * Leadership Education in Adolescent Health (LEAH): MCH H.O.P.E.S. (Birmingham, AL) * Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities (LEND): Cincinnati Children's Hospital (Cincinnati, OH) * Healthy Tomorrows: Clinic in the Park (Santa Ana, CA) This resource includes the meeting agenda, PowerPoint slides, transcripts, discussion notes, and other materials.

State Approaches to Addressing Health Disparities. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Conference of State Legislatures and Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. Presenter(s): Shavon Arline-Bradley; Jim Abeler, Sarah Hernandez. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 58 minutes.

Annotation: Health disparities—differences in health and health care experienced by groups based on social, economic and environmental factors—persist across the nation. Each year, health disparities lead to significant human and financial costs, as certain people experience poorer living conditions, worse health status and treatment outcomes, and more difficulty accessing health care services than their peers in other population groups. State legislators have pursued various policy approaches to reduce health disparities in their communities and states. Through legislative tracking, NCSL has identified multiple strategies being pursued by states, including increasing workforce diversity, improving cultural competence in health care services and addressing the social determinants of health. This webinar, sponsored by NCSL and the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, discusses why state policymakers may consider addressing health disparities, and explore state policy approaches and examples.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.