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Displaying records 1 through 8 of 8 found.

From Problem to Prevention: Evidence-Based Public Health. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Greater Midwest Region. Presenter(s): Derek Johnson, MLIS. Type: Webcast. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This introductory webinar provides attendees with a basic definition and framework for evidence-based public health. Special attention is paid to three of the seven steps: Community Assessment, Determining What is Known in the Literature, and Evaluating the Program or Policy. Free resources are presented that can assist practitioners with these specific steps of the evidence-based public health framework. yyy

Learning Objectives: • Define and describe evidence-based public health. • Identify a public health need and formulate an answerable question. • Locate and search applicable literature and resources. • Understand the importance of evaluation and locate helpful resources.

Special Instructions: Registration required before accessing this course.

Data-Driven Leadership: Lead with Data-Driven Decisions and Predictive Analytics. Year Developed: 2016. Source: GovLoop. Presenter(s): Alan S. Berson. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Introductory. Length: 20 minutes.

Annotation: Leading with the cold hard facts can be a reassuring method to know you’re making the best decisions for your organization. But this can be challenging at times when you have to discern between “good” data and “bad” data. Harnessing methods for data analysis is easier said than done, but it can make all the difference in leading your organization. This course is led by Dr. Henry Thibodeaux, Assessment and Evaluations Leader in the Office of Personnel Management, and Allen Schweyer, Executive Director of Talent Management and Leadership University. The course comprises an overview and introduction, 5 lessons, and a post-course survey. yyy

Learning Objectives: • Discern the difference between correlation and causation. • Understand the importance of framing data analysis with precise questions and objectives. • Learn to distinguish “good” data from “bad” data. • Gain familiarity with several common data analysis techniques and where they should be used.

Continuing Education: GovLoop is registered with the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA) as a sponsor of continuing professional education on the National Registry of CPE Sponsors.

Community Engagement in Public Health Interventions for Disadvantaged Groups: What's the Evidence?. Year Developed: 2016. Source: Health Evidence. Presenter(s): Alison O'Mara-Eves. Type: Webinar. Level: Advanced Introductory. Length: 72 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar examines the effectiveness of community engagement in public health interventions for disadvantaged groups. Community engagement is becoming an increasingly popular component included in the development and implementation of public health interventions. This review examines the use of public health interventions with a community engagement component, particularly for its use in reducing health inequities among disadvantaged populations. Findings of the review suggest community engagement in public health interventions has an effect on several health outcomes, including health behaviors and self-efficacy.

Adapting Evidence-Based Interventions for New Populations and Settings. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health; Region 2 Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): Rachel C. Shelton, ScD, MPH. Type: Webcast. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: 60 minutes. TRAIN.org link

Annotation: Dissemination and implementation sciences are defined as the systematic study of how a specific set of activities and designated strategies are used to successfully adopt and integrate an evidence-based public health intervention (EBI) within specific settings, and are comprised of four steps: 1) exploration, 2) adoption/preparation, 3) implementation, and 4) sustainment. The overall goal is to reduce the gap between science and practice/policy. Implementation research speaks more to processes and factors associated with successful integration of EBIs within a particular setting, while dissemination research focuses on the processes and factors that lead to widespread adoption and use of EBIs. EBIs are shaped by research evidence, resources, population, and context, and are popularly used due to their demonstrated effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and fast process. In order to successfully select an EBI, interventionists must Identify community needs, assess organizational capacity, and search program registries to select a program. When preparing for implementation, and EBI can either be adopted as is or adapted to fit the local conditions. Adaptation is an important part of the process in order to enhance engagement, reach the audience, address disparities, increase fit and relevance, and reinforce the message. Adaptations can be either surface or deep structure, and the use of either or both should be a conscious, well thought out decision. Surface adaptations use visual and auditory cues for culturally appropriate messages, while deep structure adaptations involves cultural sensitivity and comprehensive understanding of ethnic group’s core cultural values, norms, and stressors (economic, social, environmental) affecting health behaviors. Models for guiding adaptation include Card, ADAPT-ITT, and MAP.

Continuing Education: 1 CHES; 1 CPHCE

A Public Health with Impact: The Path to What Works. Year Developed: 2014 est.. Source: National Association of County and City Health Officials. Presenter(s): Brandie Adams-Piphus, MPH. Type: Podcast. Level: Introductory. Length: 12 minutes.

Annotation: Brandie Adams-Piphus, MPH, NACCHO Senior Program Analyst, describes the role of the health department in advancing evidence-based public health and helpful resources. This podcast increases local health officials' awareness of their role in using evidence-based public health practice to prevent chronic disease and keep people healthier. yyy

Learning Objectives: • Define evidence-based public health and the role of the LHO in evidence-based public health. • Describe how NACCHO’s Framework for Evidence-Based Decision Making and Planning can help you carry out your role in evidence-based public health. • Utilize tools and resources that can help you put NACCHO’s Framework for Evidence-Based Decision Making and Planning into practice.

Using the Evidence-Based Public Health Framework to Move Policy Forward . Year Developed: 2011. Source: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. Presenter(s): Dr. Ross Brownson. Type: Webcast. Level: Introductory. Length: 20-25 minutes.

Annotation: In this training, Dr. Borwnson presents the seven-stage evidence-based public health (EBPH) framework and how it can inform evidence-based policies. Dr. Brownson is a Professor of Epidemiology at Washington University in St. Louis. Dr. Brownson is the author of six books and over 280 peer-reviewed articles. His books include Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control, Applied Epidemiology, Handbook of Obesity Prevention, Communicating Public Health Information Effectively: A Guide for Practitioners, and Evidence-Based Public Health. yyy

Learning Objectives: • Understand how the seven-stage EBPH framework can inform evidence-based policies. • Learn how to enhance evidence based public health through the EBPH framework.

Special Instructions: This course provider requires additional registration and/or a fee outside of TRAIN. Click on the 'Go to Step 2 of Registration' button to add this course to 'My Learning' and proceed to the course provider's website.

Program Development and Evaluation. Year Developed: 2011. Source: New York - New Jersey Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): New York - New Jersey Public Health Training Center. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This interactive tutorial takes learners through the program development process, including identifying a problem, planning, and implementation. The module further focuses on evaluation by describing stakeholders and explaining the difference between formative and summative evaluation. Through question and answer interactions, creating program goals, SMART objectives and logic models are also covered. The tutorial additionally describes factors that may influence program outcomes.

Learning Objectives: • Recognize how evaluation fits within the program development process. • List three reasons why public health program evaluations are important. • Explain the difference between formative and summative program evaluations. • Describe at least five aspects of a public health program that can be measured. • Identify at least two factors external to a public health program that may affect its evaluation.

Special Instructions: Registration is required. Click on "Enroll in NTNJ PHTC". Click on "Enroll" and click "Create an account now".

Continuing Education: 1 contact hour available in Category I CECH in health education, nursing continuing education, category 1 continuing medical education toward AMA/PRA Physician’s Recognition Award, and one hour in general continuing education credits.

Evaluating a Public Health Program. Year Developed: 2011. Source: New York - New Jersey Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This online course is the last in a series of trainings dealing with the development and evaluation of public health programs. This training serves as a comprehensive tutorial on the Evaluation of a Public Health Program. The process of Program Evaluation continues the use of pertussis reduction in Lakeshore County as an example program and utilizes the logic model developed in the "Introduction to Logic Models" training. The primary focus of the course is to explore the six steps and the four standard groups in the Center for Disease Control's Framework for Program Evaluation. This framework represents all of the activities prescribed by the CDC in Program Evaluation, along with sensible guidance under the standards to aid in good decision-making.

Learning Objectives: • List six steps in the CDC Framework for Program Evaluation. • Apply the four standards in the CDC Framework for Program Evaluation. • Identify stakeholders roles and responsibilities. • Compose evaluation questions to focus the evaluation. • Recognize process and outcome indicators. • Compare and contrast methods for gathering evidence. • Recognize sources used in identifying program standards. • Discuss strategies to disseminate findings and share lessons learned.

Special Instructions: Registration required to access this course.

Continuing Education: 1 CHES; 1 CME; 1 CNE Contact Hours

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.