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Using Geographic Information Science to Advance Heath Equity and Environmental Justice. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Region 2 Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): Andrew Maroko, PhD. Type: Webcast. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: n.a..

Annotation: Environmental factors have an important impact on the health of communities. Public health professionals may use geographic information sciences (GIS) to assess the health of communities by analyzing exposure, or being subjected to negative factors such as pollution, as well as accessibility, or the ability to access positive factors such as green space and healthy food. In this webinar, Dr. Andrew Maroko discusses the process of geovisualization, hypothesis generation, data exploration, and communication and knowledge transfer in conducting environmental justice research. Dr. Maroko also describes various methods and technologies used to estimate exposure and accessibility, and provides examples of GIS in environmental justice/health equity projects in New York City and Glasgow, Scotland.

Learning Objectives: • To describe how geographic information science can be used to advance health equity and environmental justice. • To describe the environmental factors that lead to health disparities. • To list examples of how geographic information science has been used in health equity research.

Special Instructions: Registration required before accessing this course.

Continuing Education: CHES, CPHCE

Engaging and Partnering with Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Communities. Year Developed: 2015. Source: National Center for Cultural Competence. Presenter(s): Wendy Jones, Barbara Hueler. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Advanced. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: Establishing and sustaining broad-based community partnerships in support of the full inclusion of and equity for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) present myriad benefits while simultaneously presenting unique challenges. Many organizations and programs within the I/DD network continue to struggle with engaging communities in a culturally and linguistically competent manner. This forum explores the experiences of organizations in Arizona, California, and Maryland in their successful initiatives to engage African American, Chinese, and Latino/Hispanic communities in support of people with intellectual and development disabilities across the lifespan.

Learning Objectives: • Examine the conceptual frameworks, values, and practices of cultural and linguistic competence within the context of community engagement. • Describe approaches and strategies to engage diverse communities to plan, implement, and evaluate services and supports for individuals who experience developmental and other disabilities and their families. • Reflect on the role of leadership in bringing about organizational and system change.

Women's Integrated Systems for Health (WISH) Online Training Series. Year Developed: 2012. Source: North Carolina Institute for Public Health. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: The Women's Integrated Systems for Health (WISH) Online Training Series focuses on key components of an integrated approach to promoting the health of women during late adolescence and throughout the child-bearing years. This training series arose from the need for practice-based tools that advance multi-disciplinary partnership, community engagement and using evidence-based approaches grounded in proven theoretical models. The series consists of the following 6 Modules: • Introduction to an Integrated Approach • Defining the Challenge • Principles and Frameworks Guiding the Integrated Approach • Developing Evidence-Based Programs • Building and Supporting Partnerships and Community Engagement • Bringing it All Together - An Integrated Approach

Learning Objectives: Module 1--Introduction to an Integrated Approach • Define the target audience for the WISH Orientation Training Series. • Discuss the rationale for an integrated approach to women's health and wellness. • List examples of national trends towards integrated, outcome-oriented approaches. • Describe the frameworks that serve as guides to a comprehensive approach to promoting women's health. Module 2--Defining the Challenge • Describe epidemiologic data for women of childbearing age related to mental health, substance abuse, violence and injury, and chronic disease. • Discuss the inter-relationship of these issues as they impact women’s health. Module 3--Principles and Frameworks Guiding the Integrated Approach • Describe how health behaviors result from a complex interaction of factors-biological, cultural, economic and political. • Describe three frameworks that serve as guides for designing and implementing a comprehensive approach to women’s wellness. • Describe how a public health framework may be applied to optimize mental health strategies to improve the health of individuals and populations. Module 4--Developing Evidence-Based Programs • Define evidence-based practices and policies and potential impact on public health programs. • Define levels of evidence. • Describe two sources of evidence-based programs. • Describe the role of policy in improving integration of care Identify mechanisms for monitoring and evaluating programs and policies. Module 5--Building and Supporting Partnerships and Community Engagement • Recognize the importance of building partnerships and supporting community engagement to integrate care for women’s wellness. • Outline the basic guidelines and steps for developing partnerships and engaging the community. • Describe the Collective Impact Approach and its key concepts. Module 6--Bringing it All Together - An Integrated Approach • Describe how various components such as evidence-based practice, a public health approach and partnership come together to form an integrated approach to women’s health issues. • Cite 3 examples of how an integrated approach made an impact in real life situations. • Identify 3 specific actions which can be taken to apply some of what has been learned in this training series.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account.

Eight Steps to Building and Sustaining Effective Coalitions. Year Developed: 2010. Source: South Central Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): Frances Dunn Butterfoss, PhD, MSEd. Type: Video Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 90 minutes. Troubleshooting Tips for South Central Public Health Partnership Courses

Annotation: This video provides an overview of coalitions, including how and when to use them. The presenter provides eight steps for building effective coalitions that promote health, a healthy environment, and disease prevention: 1) Clarify vision and mission, 2) Create ownership of coalition, 3) Solidify coalition infrastructure and process, 4) Recruit and retain and active, diverse membership, 5) Develop transformational leaders, 6) Market your coalition, 7) Focus on action, and 8) Evaluate your coalition. Characteristics of and barriers to successful coalitions are discussed, followed by examples of actual community coalitions, such as Virginians for a Healthy Future. **NOTE: This course was originally delivered as a satellite broadcast. Contact hours (2).

Learning Objectives: • Describe three characteristics of effective coalitions. • Recount three successes and three barriers to coalition effectiveness and their resolutions. • Identify eight essential steps for building and sustaining effective coalitions. • Learn valuable lessons from actual community coalitions.

Special Instructions: Logging in to the Alabama Department of Public Health portal is required.

Increasing Meaningful Partnerships between Families and MCH Partnerships [Cultivating Family/Professional Partnerships]. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: Maternal and Child Health Public Health Leadership Institute. Presenter(s): Eileen Forlenza. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 30 minutes.

Annotation: In this 30-minute presentation, Eileen Forlenza, a nationally renowned family leader and speaker on Children with Special Health Care Needs (CSHCN), addresses four critical strategies to establish meaningful partnerships between families of CSHCN and MCH professionals. The focus of the lesson is on the importance of involving and partnering with families at all levels of programming and leadership in public health organizations—especially organizations that work with children and individuals with special health care needs. The presentation provides valuable skills to engage and empower families as well as considerations organizations should take into account in regard to quality improvement and shifting the role of the agency from a dependency model to an empowerment model. It also gives tangible tools to promote family leadership, participation, and inclusion in all areas of an organization.

Learning Objectives: • Understand how to create a shared vision. • Describe the progression of family leadership. • Learn how you can promote partnerships in public health.

Special Instructions: To access this learning opportunity, scroll down on the landing page to “Increasing Meaningful Partnerships between Families and MCH Partnerships” leadership module and click on “View Module Presentation.” Title on the first slide is "Cultivating Family/Professional Partnerships."

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.