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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 15 found.

From Problem to Prevention: Evidence-Based Public Health. Year Developed: 2017. Source: National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Greater Midwest Region. Presenter(s): Derek Johnson, MLIS. Type: Webcast. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This introductory webinar provides attendees with a basic definition and framework for evidence-based public health. Special attention is paid to three of the seven steps: Community Assessment, Determining What is Known in the Literature, and Evaluating the Program or Policy. Free resources will be shown that can assist practitioners with these specific steps of the evidence-based public health framework.

Learning Objectives: • Define and describe evidence-based public health. • Identify a public health need and formulate an answerable question. • Locate and search applicable literature and resources. • Understand the importance of evaluation and locate helpful resources.

Special Instructions: Registration required before accessing this course.

Using Quality Improvement Tools to Uncover the Root Causes of Health System Issues. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Presenter(s): Amanda Cornett, MPH; Donna Lindemulder, MA; Kori Flower, MD, MPH; Pat Bailey, LMSW. Type: Video Conference. Level: Introductory. Length: 78 minutes.

Annotation: This interactive skill building session introduces quality improvement tools (e.g. Fishbone, 5 Whys) that can assist states in conducting root cause analysis related to health reform within their state. The session offers state‐specific examples and provide participants an opportunity to apply the tools. The Affordable Care Act offers opportunities to improve public health and health care delivery systems, and ultimately health outcomes for MCH populations. Title V programs are in a position to help lead efforts to implement health system reforms that result in improvement. Success in leading change will require new skills and strategies aimed at collaborating with multidisciplinary partners to address the underlying system issues that negatively impact health.

The Applicability and Transferability (A&T) Tool. Year Developed: 2015. Source: National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools. Presenter(s): Donna Ciliska, RN, PhD; Melanie Hood, MsC; Stephanie Bale, MPH; Shannon Dowdall-Smith, RN, PhD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 57 minutes (42 slides). presentation slides

Annotation: The Applicability and Transferability of Evidence Tool (A&T Tool) is designed to help public health managers and planners to choose appropriate programs for their communities. This tool gives a process and criteria to assess: -Applicability, or the feasibility of providing an intervention in a local setting (i.e. effectiveness, organizational culture and capacity) -Transferability, the likelihood that the intervention developed and delivered in one setting can achieve the same outcomes when applied in a different local setting.

Learning Objectives:

Title V Five Year Needs Assessment Training: Part 2: Nuts and Bolts on Using Data. Year Developed: 2014. Source: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Presenter(s): Samara Viner-Brown, MS; Yvonne Goldsmith, Caroline Stampfel, MPH. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 59 minutes. Course Resources

Annotation: Title V legislation requires each state and jurisdiction to conduct a state-wide, comprehensive needs assessment every five years. The needs assessment process can be a useful tool for strategic planning, strategic decision-making and resource allocation. It also provides a way for Title V programs to benchmark where they are and assess progress over a five-year period. To assist states or jurisdictions in preparing their assessments AMCHP hosted a series of virtual trainings to provide guidance on the needs assessment process. The second webinar, The Nuts and Bolts on Using Data, features a presentation from Caroline Stampfel, MPH, currently the Senior Epidemiologist at AMCHP and formerly an MCH Lead Analyst with the Virginia Title V program, on using data in the needs assessment process. Ms. Stampfel’s presentation is followed by two states-in-action profiles, Rhode Island and Alaska, who shared their data strategies, resources, and lessons learned from conducting the five-year needs assessment process. In order to capitalize on the information presented in the virtual training, AMCHP recommended that states consider team participation in the training, i.e., participation from both program and data staff.

Learning Objectives: • Give examples of effective uses of qualitative and quantitative data sources for the needs assessment. • Begin to identify possible frameworks to organize needs assessment data. • Develop next steps/strategies for using data in their own Title V five year needs assessment.

Title V Five Year Needs Assessment Training. Year Developed: 2014. Source: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Presenter(s): Donna Petersen, ScD, MHS, CPH; Ron Benham, MDiv; Karin Downs, RN, MPH. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 90 minutes. Course Resources

Annotation: Title V legislation requires each state and jurisdiction to conduct a state-wide, comprehensive needs assessment every five years. The needs assessment process can be a useful tool for strategic planning, strategic decision-making and resource allocation. It also provides a way for Title V programs to benchmark where they are and assess progress over a five-year period. This archived webinar provides an overview of the needs assessment process with a presentation from Donna Petersen, ScD, MHS, CPH, Dean for the College of Public Health at the University of South Florida. Dr. Petersen presented on the “Nuts and Bolts of the Five Year Needs Assessment”, followed by a state-in-action example from Massachusetts. The Massachusetts MCH team shared their strategies, resources and lessons learned from conducting the five-year needs assessment process. Training Resources include participant pre-work; webinar slides; a resource list developed by the MCH Navigator and MCH Library; and materials from Massachusetts and are available from AMCHP's Course Resources page (above).

Learning Objectives: • Describe the Title V five-year needs assessment purpose and goals. • Articulate the major components of a comprehensive needs assessment. • Develop next steps/strategies for their five-year needs assessment plan.

Engaging Communities in Public Health Research, Practice and Policy. Year Developed: 2013. Source: University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Byllye Avery, MEd; Amy Jo Schulz, PhD. Type: Narrated Slide Presentation. Level: Intermediate. Length: Self-paced. List of all courses

Annotation: This training focuses on effective methods for engaging minority and other communities in health research, practice, and policy. Topics discussed include community and policy level strategies to reduce health disparities as well as how to implement effective research, policies, and practices that reduce health disparities.

Learning Objectives: • Identify how to effectively engage communities in public health work, such as needs assessments, policy implementation, and advocacy. • Identify ways researchers, health professionals, advocates, and citizens can work together to reduce health disparities.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account.

Continuing Education: 0.25 CEU/CE; 3 CPH Recertification Credits

Basic Epidemiology. Year Developed: 2013. Source: Upper Midwest Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This course is intended for public health practitioners who do not have significant knowledge or experience in the field of epidemiology. The course offers an opportunity to learn how an epidemiologist investigates the causes of disease, its distribution, how it spreads, and measures for control and prevention. There are four modules in this course: 1. Important Terms in Epidemiology 2. Models for Understanding the Infectious Process 3. Epidemiology in Practice 4. Surveillance

Learning Objectives: • Discuss important terms and concepts for basic epidemiology practice. • Describe the inter-related aspects of the infectious disease process and methods of breaking this "chain" of infection. • Understand basic epidemiology in practice, using a case study of a food-borne outbreak as an example. • Perform basic surveillance tasks in an appropriate and timely manner. • Utilize your regional epidemiologist as a resource for outbreak investigations.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Identifying Community Health Needs and Assets (Community Toolbox Module 2). Year Developed: 2012. Source: Kansas Department of Health and Environment with the KU Work Group for Community Health and Development. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 45 minutes.

Annotation: This course covers these topics: elements of a community health assessment, what a community need is, uses of data on community needs, when these needs should be assessed, and steps for assessing needs and community assets. The course includes slides and activities, audio files, a practice guide to help readers apply what they have learned in their own communities, a glossary, and supplementary readings.

Learning Objectives: • Identify communities with unmet/disproportionate health needs • Describe what matters to people in the community • Describe the resources available for addressing identified issues

Special Instructions: You must log into TRAIN.org to access this course. - This course includes audio files, a post assessment, evaluation and a certificate of completion. - Make sure your Pop Up Blockers are OFF. - Use Internet Explorer or Google Chrome as your browser. Test the compatibility of your computer for taking this online course: » Click the Help button located on the KS-TRAIN taskbar, hompage. » Left-hand menu click, 'Test Your Environment', Run Test button. » All of the checkmark buttons must be GREEN. » If any of the links are RED click the link and follow the prompts.

Developing a Logic Model for Community Health Improvement (Community Toolbox Module 5). Year Developed: 2012. Source: Kansas Department of Health and Environment with the KU Work Group for Community Health and Development. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 30 minutes.

Annotation: This course describes what a framework and logic model are, why and when logic models should be used, benefits and limitations, and how to develop a logic model. The course includes slides and activities, audio files, a practice guide to help readers apply what they have learned in their own communities, a glossary, and supplementary readings.

Learning Objectives: • Develop a framework or model of change to guide your improvement efforts.

Special Instructions: You must log into TRAIN.org to access this course. - This course includes audio files, a post assessment, evaluation and a certificate of completion. - Allow 30 minutes to take this course. - Make sure your Pop Up Blockers are OFF. - Use Internet Explorer or Google Chrome as your browser. Test the compatibility of your computer for taking this online course: » Click the Help button located on the KS-TRAIN taskbar, hompage. » Left-hand menu click, 'Test Your Environment'. » All of the checkmarks must be GREEN. » If any of the links are RED click the link and follow the prompts.

Leadership and Advocacy: Trends and Challenges in Maternal and Child Health. Year Developed: 2011. Source: South Central Public Health Partnership. Presenter(s): Michael Fraser, PhD. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Introductory. Length: Self-paced. Troubleshooting Tips for South Central Public Health Partnership Courses

Annotation: In 1935, Title V of the Social Security Act established a federal-state partnership to address the needs of the maternal and child health population. Over the years, though changes have occurred, Title V remains the oldest federal program dedicated to the health of all mothers and children. Strong leadership and advocacy skills are critical to the program’s success. Program faculty discussed national trends in maternal and child health, national leadership for MCH, current challenges and opportunities, and future directions. *NOTE: This course was originally delivered as a satellite broadcast.

Learning Objectives: • Describe maternal and child health leadership and current challenges and opportunities. • Discuss leadership and the importance of advocacy. • Present applications of maternal and child leadership in current practice settings. • Provide ideas and suggestions for future directions of Title V Maternal and Child Health Programs in light of the Affordable Care Act.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Continuing Education: Certificate of Attendance; CEUs: Nursing 1.5 hours, Social Work 1.5 hours

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.