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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 10 found.

Systems Mapping Video Series. Year Developed: 2021. Source: National MCH Workforce Development Center. Presenter(s): Jessica Cohen, MSW. Type: Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 5 minutes each.

Annotation: ​​​​​The five minute System Mapping Video S​eries introduces nine system mapping tools in brief 2-5 minute videos. While there are many system m​apping approaches available, this series specifically highlights those approaches that the National MCH Workforce Development Center has found the most useful as Title V (or other public health) leaders work to address wicked system problems. These high-level introductory videos are designed to help learners become familiar with each approach and what a resulting "map" might look like.

Learning Objectives: Understand the components of: • Causal Loop Diagramming • Circle of Care • Concept Mapping • The Five R's • Network Mapping • Process Flow Diagramming • Simulation • System Support Maps • Whole System Mapping

Using Process Flow Diagramming To Understand and Improve MCH Systems and Position Title V for Health Care Reform. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Presenter(s): Amanda Cornett, MPH; Kori Flower, MS, MD, MPH; Kristen Hassmiller Lich, MHA, PhD; Sue Ewy, MS. Type: Video. Level: Intermediate. Length: 98 minutes.

Annotation: This interactive, hands‐on workshop provides background on process flow diagramming, features a presentation by a state from the National MCH Workforce Development Center cohort, and gives participants an opportunity to practice process flow diagramming using a simulated MCH process. Participants leave with a plan to apply this tool to MCH processes in their state/territory. To lead in health care reform, Title V agencies need enhanced training and tools for understanding complex processes. The National MCH Workforce Development Center (WDC) at UNC Chapel Hill has partnered with MCHB and AMCHP to offer intensive training to state and territorial Title V leaders. In the first WDC cohort, process flow diagramming has been a powerful tool for identifying areas for reducing redundancy and eliminating gaps in services.

Systems Integration: A Parent’s Perspective. Year Developed: 2015. Source: University of California Berkeley School of Public Health. Presenter(s): Erica Monasterio, FNP. Type: Video. Level: Intermediate. Length: 25 minutes.

Annotation: This recorded lecture presents the personal perspective of a parent of a child with special health care needs of systems integration. The presentation focuses on what providers need to be knowledgeable about CYSHCN, provide care, and understand and coordinate systems in an era when there are building pressures related to pediatrician productivity.

System Change Yin and Yang, How To Promote Quality Improvement and Adaptability While Maintaining Fidelity Across Communities and Partnerships. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Presenter(s): Adrienne Gilbert, MPH; Angela Paxton; Mary Jo Paladino, MSA; Nancy Swigonski, MD, MPH. Type: Video. Level: Intermediate. Length: 52 minutes.

Annotation: This workshop highlights both the tension and successes (yin & yang) of: 1) collaborations and partnerships among health care professionals, families of CYSHCN, and community partners, including schools, not‐for‐profits, and insurers; 2) use of measures and data to ensure consistently positive outcomes 3) use of a family‐driven systems change approach rather than a program based approach in North Carolina to address community improvements for families of CYSHCN and 4) allowing flexibility needed for implementation efforts across widely varying communities and health care settings while maintaining fidelity to the program. North Carolina’s Innovative Approaches (IA) initiative and Indiana’s Child Health Improvement Partnership (CHIP IN for Quality) share how they each created positive change in statewide systems that provide services to CYSHCN.

Collective Impact through Systems Mapping. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Presenter(s): Dorothy Cilenti, DrPH, MSW, MPH; Kristen Hassmiller Lich, MHA, PhD; Stephen Orton, PhD. Type: Video. Level: Advanced. Length: 122 minutes.

Annotation: This skills‐building session equips state‐level MCH leaders with the tools to address social determinants of health and engage their communities, as they work toward eliminating birth outcome inequities. It draws on the experience of nine local urban Ohio communities, who make up the Ohio Institute for Equity in Birth Outcomes – an Ohio Department of Health and CityMatCH collaboration. Participants are led through a brainstorming and strategic planning process that offers guidance for state‐ and local‐level interaction, as well as, the design and implementation of data‐informed, community‐driven upstream interventions. Furthermore, participants learn about tactics for engaging non‐traditional partners, in non‐health sectors, that influence policy, systems and environment.

Addressing Preparedness Challenges for Children in Public Health Emergencies. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Video. Level: Advanced. Length: 62 minutes. YouTube Video

Annotation: This session of CDC Grand Rounds discusses strategies to address the unique vulnerabilities of children in every stage of emergency planning. Presenters highlight the strong progress that has been made in pediatric disaster readiness as well as the collaboration that is still needed between public health professionals and pediatric care providers to improve the outcomes for children during emergencies.

Learning Objectives: • Understand that children have different needs than adults, and require special attention, such as pediatric-focused care during emergencies. • Address the unique needs of children that have not been adequately addressed in the planning process. • Incorporate the needs of children into emergency preparedness planning.

Continuing Education: CME, CE

Systems Integration Training Spotlight. Year Developed: 2014. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): Beth DeFrancis, MLS; Keisha Watson-Bah, PhD; John Richards, MA. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: Series, various lengths.

Annotation: This training spotlight, developed by the MCH Navigator, provides links to selected trainings and related tools on the topics of systems integration, integrated services, and systems development. It addresses a priority focus of the National MCH Workforce Development Center. At the heart of systems integration lies systems thinking, a discipline for seeing wholes, interrelationships and patterns of change. By focusing on the interrelationships among key elements within a system, and the influence of these interrelationships on the system’s behavior over time, leaders implementing improvements can pursue several goals at once, simultaneously reducing the potential for unintended consequences by predicting upstream and downstream influences and effects. By coordinating efforts across systems of care, programs to improve maternal and child health (MCH) can increase coverage and reduce barriers to the use of services and supports. Linking medical and non-medical sectors (to encompass education, housing, social services, mental health, and early childhood systems) can help minimize risk factors and promote health and wellness across the life course.

Women's Integrated Systems for Health (WISH) Online Training Series. Year Developed: 2012. Source: North Carolina Institute for Public Health. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: The Women's Integrated Systems for Health (WISH) Online Training Series focuses on key components of an integrated approach to promoting the health of women during late adolescence and throughout the child-bearing years. This training series arose from the need for practice-based tools that advance multi-disciplinary partnership, community engagement and using evidence-based approaches grounded in proven theoretical models. The series consists of the following 6 Modules: • Introduction to an Integrated Approach • Defining the Challenge • Principles and Frameworks Guiding the Integrated Approach • Developing Evidence-Based Programs • Building and Supporting Partnerships and Community Engagement • Bringing it All Together - An Integrated Approach

Learning Objectives: Module 1--Introduction to an Integrated Approach • Define the target audience for the WISH Orientation Training Series. • Discuss the rationale for an integrated approach to women's health and wellness. • List examples of national trends towards integrated, outcome-oriented approaches. • Describe the frameworks that serve as guides to a comprehensive approach to promoting women's health. Module 2--Defining the Challenge • Describe epidemiologic data for women of childbearing age related to mental health, substance abuse, violence and injury, and chronic disease. • Discuss the inter-relationship of these issues as they impact women’s health. Module 3--Principles and Frameworks Guiding the Integrated Approach • Describe how health behaviors result from a complex interaction of factors-biological, cultural, economic and political. • Describe three frameworks that serve as guides for designing and implementing a comprehensive approach to women’s wellness. • Describe how a public health framework may be applied to optimize mental health strategies to improve the health of individuals and populations. Module 4--Developing Evidence-Based Programs • Define evidence-based practices and policies and potential impact on public health programs. • Define levels of evidence. • Describe two sources of evidence-based programs. • Describe the role of policy in improving integration of care Identify mechanisms for monitoring and evaluating programs and policies. Module 5--Building and Supporting Partnerships and Community Engagement • Recognize the importance of building partnerships and supporting community engagement to integrate care for women’s wellness. • Outline the basic guidelines and steps for developing partnerships and engaging the community. • Describe the Collective Impact Approach and its key concepts. Module 6--Bringing it All Together - An Integrated Approach • Describe how various components such as evidence-based practice, a public health approach and partnership come together to form an integrated approach to women’s health issues. • Cite 3 examples of how an integrated approach made an impact in real life situations. • Identify 3 specific actions which can be taken to apply some of what has been learned in this training series.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account.

Historical Trauma and Generational Trauma: Significance and Response (Lessons from the Field: Traumatic Stress Series). Year Developed: 2012. Source: University of Minnesota Extension, Children, Youth & Family Consortium. Presenter(s): Atum Azzahir; BraVada Garrett-Akinsanya, PhD; Jessica Gourneau; Melissa Walls, PhD . Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: Series; various lengths. Part 2

Annotation: This training discusses the historical and generational trauma from the perspective of American Indians and African Americans and builds on Dr. Karina Walter’s presentation (see Historical Trauma, Microaggressions, and Identity: A Framework for Culturally-Based Practice). A panel of community and university professionals discuss cultural ways of knowing, how healing and wellness take place within families and communities, and where the science of historical and intergenerational trauma currently exists. The training consists of a video (74 minutes) and presentation notes by each author. This Lesson from the Field aims to facilitate professionals’ use of a broad and inclusive lens in their work with children, youth, and families impacted by historical and generational trauma to restore and promote cultural identity and promote healing and wellness.

Learning Objectives: • Understand approaches to historical and generational trauma from community, science, and historical perspectives. • Define a theory of “sickness” and the impact of loss of culture and community on individual health and healing. • Identify the impact of historical and intergenerational trauma on communities, families, and individuals. • Incorporate cultural ways of knowing and healing for individuals, families, and communities.

Strategic Skills Training Series: Introduction to Systems Thinking. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: Region 2 Public Health Training Center (PHTC). Presenter(s): Varies. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Introductory. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: The Strategic Skills Training Series developed by the Region 2 Public Health Training Center (PHTC) aims to help prepare public health practitioners to develop the practices and competencies associated with being a Chief Health Strategist. The modules in this series use the community health improvement planning process to introduce you to the basics of the following four strategic skills areas. This first set of modules has been developed at an introductory level; the next part of the series will build on these foundational modules.

Learning Objectives: • Consider events, patterns, and structures related to a complex problem • Explain what a complex adaptive system is • Explain how mental models impact the way we perceive a problem • List some key systems thinking habits to develop

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $225,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.