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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 19 found.

What Title V Agencies Are Doing to Advance Health Equity and Social Determinants of Health: A Summary. Year Developed: 2021. Source: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health. Presenter(s): John Richards. Type: Video. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: 24 minutes.

Annotation: This video describes how Title V agencies are addressing health equity and social determinants of health (SDOH) as a response to their recent five-year needs assessment. It gives specific strategies being conducted by states and jurisdictions. The presenter then provides a conceptual framework for addressing disparities. This framework serves as the structure to discuss several practical tools to use in equity work. The presentation ends with a summary of where to find additional resources.

Learning Objectives: • Identify how Title V agencies are addressing health equity issues as discovered in their needs assessment. • Synthesize common strategies being used in the field related to both health equity and SDOH. • Utilize additional resources through the MCH Navigator.

Engaging Young People & Promoting Mental Health Education on Social Media. Year Developed: 2020. Source: The Institute for Innovation & Implementation. Presenter(s): Chantel Garrett; Syrena Clark. Type: Webinar. Level: Introductory. Length: 86 minutes.

Annotation: In this webinar recording, presenters discuss youth-friendly social media platforms as tools to grow awareness about mental health, best practices to engage youth online, how social media platforms can be leveraged to help youth connect with the support that they need, as well as examples from across the country.

Learning Objectives: • Become familiar with youth-friendly social media platforms as tools to grow awareness about mental health, early psychosis and clinical high risk. • Discuss best practices and principles to engage youth online through relevant messaging and social media engagement strategies. • Discuss how social media platforms can be leveraged to help youth connect with the support that they need at all phases of care. • Discuss examples and learnings from across the country.

Appreciative Inquiry: Adopting a Positive Approach to Change. Year Developed: 2020. Source: National Maternal and Child Health Workforce Development Center. Presenter(s): Steve Orton, PhD, Kris Risley, DrPH, and Nisa Hussain. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Introductory. Length: Self-paced.

Annotation: This set of slides and quizzes introduces Appreciative Inquiry (AI), a change management approach and tool that focuses on how to build on existing strengths and how to engage stakeholders to create change. It outlines a four-step AI process, provides examples, and links to additional resources.

Learning Objectives: • Understand the rationale for using Appreciative Inquiry (AI). • Use the AI tool. • Facilitate and use AI on your own.

Special Instructions: Please note that there is no audio to this presentation. You can click through, read instructions, and review the content of the slides and quizzes.

Operationalizing State-Community Partnerships for SOC Expansion. Year Developed: 2019. Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Presenter(s): Angela Keller, Joanne Trinkle, Bonita Raine, and Sheamekah Williams. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 86 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar focuses on strategies for states and communities to create effective partnerships to expand the systems of care (SOC) approach broadly to achieve shared goals of improving services and outcomes for children, youth, and young adults with behavioral health challenges and their families. A framework is presented that outlines the roles of states and communities in SOC expansion and sustainability, along with guidance for partnerships that emerged from an exploration of effective approaches. This webinar is part of the SOC Expansion Leadership Learning Community.

A New Approach to Assessing Family Engagement in Health Care Systems. Year Developed: 2019. Source: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health. Presenter(s): Beth Dworetzky; Nanfi Lubogo; Susan Chacon. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: Health care providers, payers, and systems serving children, youth and families increasingly focus on family engagement as a strategy to improve health care delivery, enhance consumer and provider satisfaction, and reduce costs. Assessing how well an organization or agency is engaging families is a critical step in achieving these goals. A recent issue brief from Family Voices, A Framework for Assessing Family Engagement in Systems Change, proposes four domains of family engagement – representation, transparency, impact and commitment. Join us as we explore this framework, share models of success and discuss common barriers to incorporating meaningful family engagement in systems-level initiatives. It is recommended that attendees read the issue brief prior to the event.

Implementation Brief: Working with Communities and Systems. Year Developed: 2018. Source: MCH Navigator. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Interactive Learning Tool. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-paced. Podcast

Annotation: This training brief provides specific learning opportunities and resources for use by the Title V workforce that focus on how to implement and execute skills associated with working with communities and systems. A podcast about the topic is included.

Engaging Diverse Families in Leadership for Systems Change. Year Developed: 2018. Source: Family Voices and National Center for Family-Professional Partnerships. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: Family organizations, professionals, and state and local agencies are increasingly seeking to engage diverse families in leadership to improve systems. This webinar provides tools and strategies to: assess and improve agency and staff readiness; identify, recruit, prepare, engage and support diverse family leaders in meaningful leadership roles; recognize family leader contributions; become an organization more focused on and capable of supporting diverse leadership. The webinar was hosted by the National Center for Family Professional Partnerships (NCFPP) and presented by Diana Autin of the Statewide Parent Advocacy Network (SPAN). A video and slides are available.

Changing the Public Conversation on Health: How to Use Framing to "Decode" Social Determinants and Health Equity. Year Developed: 2018. Source: CityMatCH. Presenter(s): Andy Wessel, MPH. Type: Webinar. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 80 minutes.

Annotation: Despite the foundational role that health plays in everyone's quality of life, the field of public health is not well understood by the general public and decision-makers. This webinar describes how the Douglas County Health Department in Omaha is applying research from FrameWorks Institute and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to build stronger support for prevention and equity approaches.

Learning Objectives: • Why our messages frequently fail to translate the importance of public health to people outside the field. • How to use well-researched values and explanatory metaphors to "decode" our work on social determinants and health equity. • Why "naked numbers" are problematic and how "social math" can help our audience better understand the significance of data • How these framing practices can be applied to MCH advocacy.

2018 DMCHWD Grantee Virtual Meeting: How to Tell Your Program's Story. Year Developed: 2018. Source: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Maternal and Child Health Workforce Development. Presenter(s): Deborah Klein Walker, EdD. Type: PowerPoint Presentation. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: Self-paced, multiple items..

Annotation: The meeting addressed how to compose and share your program's story from a high-level perspective, emphasizing effectiveness, impact, and interaction with key audiences. It also underscored the value of building and establishing relationships with decision-makers, state agencies, community organizations, and more. To highlight Dr. Klein Walker's presentation, three (3) DMCHWD grantees shared their examples during the webinar. You can view the YouTube recording of the presentation. Their slides and attachments are located on the webpage at the link in this record. The three programs were: * Leadership Education in Adolescent Health (LEAH): MCH H.O.P.E.S. (Birmingham, AL) * Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities (LEND): Cincinnati Children's Hospital (Cincinnati, OH) * Healthy Tomorrows: Clinic in the Park (Santa Ana, CA) This resource includes the meeting agenda, PowerPoint slides, transcripts, discussion notes, and other materials.

System Change Yin and Yang, How To Promote Quality Improvement and Adaptability While Maintaining Fidelity Across Communities and Partnerships. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Presenter(s): Adrienne Gilbert, MPH; Angela Paxton; Mary Jo Paladino, MSA; Nancy Swigonski, MD, MPH. Type: Video. Level: Intermediate. Length: 52 minutes.

Annotation: This workshop highlights both the tension and successes (yin & yang) of: 1) collaborations and partnerships among health care professionals, families of CYSHCN, and community partners, including schools, not‐for‐profits, and insurers; 2) use of measures and data to ensure consistently positive outcomes 3) use of a family‐driven systems change approach rather than a program based approach in North Carolina to address community improvements for families of CYSHCN and 4) allowing flexibility needed for implementation efforts across widely varying communities and health care settings while maintaining fidelity to the program. North Carolina’s Innovative Approaches (IA) initiative and Indiana’s Child Health Improvement Partnership (CHIP IN for Quality) share how they each created positive change in statewide systems that provide services to CYSHCN.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $225,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.