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Moving from Assessment to Action in Community Health Improvement. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Public Health Foundation and Association for Community Health Improvement. Presenter(s): Shawna Mercer, MSc, PhD, Stephen Petty, MA, Carrie Blumert, MPH, Sara Barry, MEd, LBP, Kevin A. Alvarnaz, MBA, and Jack Moran, MBA, PhD. Type: Webcast. Level: Introductory. Length: 59 minutes. Presentation slides

Annotation: Featuring two communities participating in the Using The Community Guide for Community Health Improvement pilot initiative, this archived webinar offers an overview of the initiative to date and highlights the stories of those participating. Led by WellSpan Health (York, PA) and INTEGRIS Health (Oklahoma City, OK), coalitions involving the local health departments and numerous other stakeholders in both communities have been using the population health driver diagram framework to take action and implement community health improvement activities to address behavioral health needs. During this webinar, representatives from WellSpan Health and INTEGRIS Health shared their experiences with the initiative over the past year, including successes and lessons learned. In addition, background information about The Guide to Community Preventive Services (The Community Guide) and the population health driver diagram framework was provided.

When Public Health Goes to Court: Judicial Structure and Functions. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Network for Public Health Law. Presenter(s): David T. Emerson, Lorre Cuzze, JD, MPH; Tina Batra Hershey, JD, MPH; Kerri McGowan Lowrey, JD, MPH. Type: Webcast. Level: Advanced. Length: 90 minutes.

Annotation: This webinar examines the structure and essential functions of the state and federal court systems, including administrative courts, explores the Tribal court system, and describes the role of court watch programs in addressing public health issues.

Continuing Education: CLEs are available for some attendees.

Using Quality Improvement Tools to Uncover the Root Causes of Health System Issues. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Presenter(s): Amanda Cornett, MPH; Donna Lindemulder, MA; Kori Flower, MD, MPH; Pat Bailey, LMSW. Type: Video Conference. Level: Introductory. Length: 78 minutes.

Annotation: This interactive skill building session introduces quality improvement tools (e.g. Fishbone, 5 Whys) that can assist states in conducting root cause analysis related to health reform within their state. The session offers state‐specific examples and provide participants an opportunity to apply the tools. The Affordable Care Act offers opportunities to improve public health and health care delivery systems, and ultimately health outcomes for MCH populations. Title V programs are in a position to help lead efforts to implement health system reforms that result in improvement. Success in leading change will require new skills and strategies aimed at collaborating with multidisciplinary partners to address the underlying system issues that negatively impact health.

Using Process Flow Diagramming To Understand and Improve MCH Systems and Position Title V for Health Care Reform. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Presenter(s): Amanda Cornett, MPH; Kori Flower, MS, MD, MPH; Kristen Hassmiller Lich, MHA, PhD; Sue Ewy, MS. Type: Video Conference. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 98 minutes.

Annotation: This interactive, hands‐on workshop provides background on process flow diagramming, features a presentation by a state from the National MCH Workforce Development Center cohort, and gives participants an opportunity to practice process flow diagramming using a simulated MCH process. Participants leave with a plan to apply this tool to MCH processes in their state/territory. To lead in health care reform, Title V agencies need enhanced training and tools for understanding complex processes. The National MCH Workforce Development Center (WDC) at UNC Chapel Hill has partnered with MCHB and AMCHP to offer intensive training to state and territorial Title V leaders. In the first WDC cohort, process flow diagramming has been a powerful tool for identifying areas for reducing redundancy and eliminating gaps in services.

The Applicability and Transferability (A&T) Tool. Year Developed: 2015. Source: National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools. Presenter(s): Donna Ciliska, RN, PhD; Melanie Hood, MsC; Stephanie Bale, MPH; Shannon Dowdall-Smith, RN, PhD. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 57 minutes (42 slides). presentation slides

Annotation: The Applicability and Transferability of Evidence Tool (A&T Tool) is designed to help public health managers and planners to choose appropriate programs for their communities. This tool gives a process and criteria to assess: -Applicability, or the feasibility of providing an intervention in a local setting (i.e. effectiveness, organizational culture and capacity) -Transferability, the likelihood that the intervention developed and delivered in one setting can achieve the same outcomes when applied in a different local setting.

Learning Objectives:

System Change Yin and Yang, How To Promote Quality Improvement and Adaptability While Maintaining Fidelity Across Communities and Partnerships. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Presenter(s): Adrienne Gilbert, MPH; Angela Paxton; Mary Jo Paladino, MSA; Nancy Swigonski, MD, MPH. Type: Video Conference. Level: Introductory. Length: 52 minutes.

Annotation: This workshop highlights both the tension and successes (yin & yang) of: 1) collaborations and partnerships among health care professionals, families of CYSHCN, and community partners, including schools, not‐for‐profits, and insurers; 2) use of measures and data to ensure consistently positive outcomes 3) use of a family‐driven systems change approach rather than a program based approach in North Carolina to address community improvements for families of CYSHCN and 4) allowing flexibility needed for implementation efforts across widely varying communities and health care settings while maintaining fidelity to the program. North Carolina’s Innovative Approaches (IA) initiative and Indiana’s Child Health Improvement Partnership (CHIP IN for Quality) share how they each created positive change in statewide systems that provide services to CYSHCN.

Partnering in the Title V Block Grant Process. Year Developed: 2015. Source: National Center for Family Professional Partnerships. Presenter(s): Nora Wells, Lisa Maynes, Pip Marks, Joni Bruce, Diana Autin. Type: Video Webinar. Level: Advanced. Length: 64 minutes. List of training webinars

Annotation: Title V needs family involvement to strengthen the Block Grant. In this webinar, a panel of family leaders from three states--California, Oklahoma, and Vermont--shared their organizations' involvement in the Block Grant process and detail their paths to partnership with their state Title V, sharing tips and lessons learned along the way for building this important relationship. The list of training webinars provides a link to the slides and 5 handouts for this presentation.

Medicaid and CHIP Fundamentals. Year Developed: 2015. Source: National Health Policy Forum. Presenter(s): Chris L. Peterson, MPP. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Advanced. Length: 51 minutes.

Annotation: This lecture covers the background of the Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission, explains how Medicaid and CHIP work independently and together. Topic covered include the statutory and program administration of the program (what are the federal and state roles), eligibility (who is covered), benefits and cost sharing (what is covered), and payment and financing issues (how much is covered). The lecture concludes with selected, real-life policy issues.

Learning Objectives:

Collective Impact through Systems Mapping. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Presenter(s): Dorothy Cilenti, DrPH, MSW, MPH; Kristen Hassmiller Lich, MHA, PhD; Stephen Orton, PhD. Type: Video Conference. Level: Intermediate. Length: 122 minutes.

Annotation: This skills‐building session equips state‐level MCH leaders with the tools to address social determinants of health and engage their communities, as they work toward eliminating birth outcome inequities. It draws on the experience of nine local urban Ohio communities, who make up the Ohio Institute for Equity in Birth Outcomes – an Ohio Department of Health and CityMatCH collaboration. Participants are led through a brainstorming and strategic planning process that offers guidance for state‐ and local‐level interaction, as well as, the design and implementation of data‐informed, community‐driven upstream interventions. Furthermore, participants learn about tactics for engaging non‐traditional partners, in non‐health sectors, that influence policy, systems and environment.

Breaking Down Infant Mortality: Achieving Measureable Impact through the CoIIN Approach. Year Developed: 2015. Source: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Presenter(s): Elaine Fitzgerald, DrPH, MIA; Ellen Pliska, MHS, CPH; Vanessa Lee, MPH. Type: Video Conference. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This workshop presented a framework developed by the National Institute for Children’s Health Quality (NICHQ) for MCH leaders to use in determining their strategic priorities for reducing infant mortality. The Collaborative Improvement and Innovation Network (CoIIN) to Reduce Infant Mortality is a multiyear, national program to save babies’ lives through quality improvement, collaborative learning and collaborative innovation. The CoIIN framework is a tool that enables states, MCH officials and all stakeholders to break down the complex, multifaceted issue of infant mortality into practical, achievable steps for improvement – first, by organizing actions by periods of engagement and then by specific strategies.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.