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Bringing it All Together: An Integrated Approach (WISH Module 6). Year Developed: 2012. Source: North Carolina Institute for Public Health. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 20 minutes.

Annotation: This is the final training in a six-part series designed for public health and/or mental health professionals who oversee health programs and services for adolescent girls and women of reproductive age. It brings together the content of the earlier modules in the series to show the complete model of the integrated approach with all of its component parts. It also has suggested exercises for learners who would like to think about how some of the concepts learned in the training series might be relevant to their own professional settings. It is strongly recommended that users complete the modules in the series in sequence. To see a complete listing for the series please go to the Training Series section of this site. The Women's Integrated Systems for Health (WISH) Online Training Series focuses on key components of an integrated approach to promoting the health of women during late adolescence and throughout the child-bearing years. This training series arose from the need for practice-based tools that advance multi-disciplinary partnership, community engagement and using evidence-based approaches grounded in proven theoretical models. Women's Integrated Systems for Health (WISH) was a training grant funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau and the Bureau of Health Professions in the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) in 2010-13 with a partnership between the NC Institute for Public Health and the Department of Maternal and Child Health at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health and the UNC Center for Maternal and Infant Health at the UNC School of Medicine. The project focused on promoting integrative community approaches to optimize mental and physical health among adolescents and women of reproductive age.

Learning Objectives: • Describe how various components such as evidence-based practice, a public health approach and partnership come together to form an integrated approach to women’s health issues. • Cite 3 examples of how an integrated approach made an impact in real life situations. • Identify 3 specific actions which can be taken to apply some of what has been learned in this training series.

Quality Improvement Quick Guide Tutorial. Year Developed: 2010. Source: Public Health Foundation. Presenter(s): Public Health Foundation . Type: Online Course Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 30 minutes.

Annotation: The problem solving steps of Plan, Do, Check and Act (PFCA) are the focus of this tutorial. An STI case example is used to explore and frame this model in detail. Quality Improvement in Public Health is defined as well. Optional audio-only, slides-only or video are available to complete the tutorial via the learner’s preference. A knowledge assessment is available for personal evaluation.

Learning Objectives: • Identify quality improvement (QI) tools in the Public Health Foundation’s online resource centers. • List the main problem solving steps of Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA).

Maximizing your Program’s Potential with Continuous Quality Improvement (Capacity Building Webinar 3). Year Developed: 2010. Source: National Association of County and City Health Officials, CityMatCH. Presenter(s): Grace Gorenflo. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: 80 minutes.

Annotation: In this webinar, part of the Emerging Issues in Maternal and Child Health Series, the presenter summarizes the purposes and benefits of continuous quality improvement (CQI). She begins by explaining the process of conducting CQI, and then reviews the PDCA framework, using an example of a home visitation program. She concludes the presentation with a discussion of the differences between CQI and program evaluation. Reference materials are available through links provided in the presentation.

Learning Objectives: • Define CQI. • Describe the Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA) process. • Understand the difference between quality improvement and evaluation. • Identify 1 - 2 examples of how to apply CQI to a home visitation program.

Continuing Education: CME for non-physicians may receive a certificate of participation; CME for physicians, CNE, and CECH CEUS of 1.5 hours are available; .15 IACET CEUs are available.

Heartland Centers: Quality Improvement Concepts. Year Developed: 2010. Source: Public Health Foundation TRAIN National. Presenter(s): Marty Galutia. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 45 minutes.

Annotation: In this short course, Marty Galutia describes quality improvement concepts and how to apply them to improve processes and systems. The presentation reviews the reasons why quality improvement is sought, the process considered broadly, and provides information specific to the Kano Model of Quality. The roles of customers and consumers in QI also are considered. Interactive exercises are built into the presentation throughout.

Special Instructions: Registration to TRAIN is required. After logging in, the course can be accessed by entering the course id (1025091) into the “Search By Course ID” box on the right side of the landing page. On the next page, click on the "Registration" tab and then click on "Launch."

Implementing and Sustaining Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) in an Organization. Year Developed: 2009. Source: Upper Midwest Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This course is designed for leaders and professionals who work in public health. The goal is to provide them with an awareness of quality improvement and how it can be used in public health to "work smarter, not harder". There are four sections in this course: Section 1: CQI Myths Section 2: Brief Overview of CQI Section 3: Incorporating CQI into Organizational Culture Section 4: Demonstrating How CQI works in Governmental Public Health – A Case Study

Learning Objectives: • Describe three common myths of CQI and the corresponding reality. • Define continuous quality improvement and how it can be used to enhance organizational performance. • Describe common characteristics of CQI. • Describe the elements needed for an organization to successfully implement and sustain CQI activities. • Discuss how to successfully incorporate CQI into an organization's culture. • Identify examples of how CQI has been implemented in a local public health agency.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Operationalizing Quality Improvement in Public Health. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Presenter(s): William Riley, PhD. Type: Online Course. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 90 minutes. Link to all online trainings.

Annotation: This online training module explains what quality improvement collaboration is, its importance in public health, and when to utilize it. Dr. Riley focuses on the model for improvement and how to write an AIM statement. Both process and outcome measures are covered as well as how to create a process map. Videos of working sessions attended by public health professionals seeking to apply quality improvement concepts and tools in their work groups are included. Questions and answers follow each of the speaker’s presentations. The module requires a pre and posttest to receive credit.

Learning Objectives: • Explain the meaning and importance of QI collaboration in public health. • Describe the model for improvement in public health. • Write an AIM statement. • Establish both outcome and process measures for QI. • Develop change strategies to achieve improvement in public health. • Create a process map related to an actual public health issue. • Identify and describe appropriate use for QI tools.

Special Instructions: Registration to the University of Minnesota School of Public Health is required.

Continuing Education: 1.5 Continuing Education Hour is available.

Heartland Centers: Quality Improvement and Evaluation. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: Missouri Institute for Community Health, Kansas TRAIN. Presenter(s): Marty Galutia. Type: Online Course Video. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: 45 minutes.

Annotation: This interactive module helps learners understand the basics of evaluative thinking in the context of process evaluation by addressing the differences between asking questions, gathering data, analyzing data and implementing change. The tutorial details the 4 steps in process evaluation, using a video example from a real health department’s processes.

Special Instructions: Registration is required. Click on the"Registration" tab. Click on "Course Search" then search for "Heartland Centers: Quality Improvement and Evaluation". Check software compliance for training portal.

Continuing Education: A completion certificate will be awarded if you receive 70% or higher on the course quiz.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.