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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 12 found.

Partnering to Catalyze Comprehensive Community Wellness. Year Developed: 2018. Source: Public Health Institute. Presenter(s): John Weisman, DrPH, MPH; Georgia Heise, BS, MS, DrPH; Bellinda K. Schoof, MHA, CPHQ. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 50 minutes.

Annotation: There is mounting recognition among health professionals that truly improving health outcomes in the U.S.—addressing acute conditions and the upstream social determinants that contribute to poor health—must be an interdisciplinary, cross-sector, and collaborative endeavor. To this end, the Public Health Leadership Forum (PHLF) at RESOLVE teamed with the Health Care Transformation Task Force (HCTTF) to develop a framework that supports enhanced collaboration between health care and public health entities. This framework, Partnering to Catalyze Comprehensive Community Wellness: An Actionable Framework for Health Care and Public Health Collaboration, outlines essential elements and key strategies for shaping effective, health-based collaboratives among public health, health care, and community-based organizations. In this web forum, members of the PHLF and HCTTF describe the essential elements of collaboration outlined in the framework, and speak to their experiences working to develop and sustain cross-sector collaborations in their organizations and communities. A video and transcript are available.

Introducing the Competencies for Performance Improvement Professionals in Public Health. Year Developed: 2018. Source: Public Health Foundation. Presenter(s): Kathleen Amos, MLIS; Ron Bialek, MPP. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory. Length: 58 minutes.

Annotation: Does your work involve activities in the areas of quality improvement, performance management, workforce development, accreditation, or community health assessment and improvement planning? Are you actively engaged in supporting your organization’s performance improvement (PI) efforts? This archived webinar introduces the Competencies for Performance Improvement Professionals in Public Health (PI Competencies), a set of skills desirable for PI professionals working in public health. Released in June 2018, the PI Competencies build on the Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals and the Core Competencies for Performance Improvement Managers to offer additional guidance in PI for public health professionals with responsibilities related to developing or implementing plans and activities in the areas of quality improvement, performance management, workforce development, accreditation readiness, or community health assessment and improvement planning. This archived webinar offers an opportunity to learn more about the PI Competencies, how these competencies were developed, and how they support workforce development efforts. A video, presentation slides, and the PI Competencies are available.

Improving Your Injury and Violence Prevention Practice: How the Core Competencies Can Work for You. Year Developed: 2017. Source: Southeastern and Southwestern Injury Prevention Alliance and Safe States Alliance. Presenter(s): Shelli Stephens-Stidham, Tom Songer, Mary Ann Contreras, Kristen Lindemer. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate. Length: 90 minutes. webinar

Annotation: This is Webinar #1 in a six-part series entitled “Improving your Injury and Violence Prevention Practice with the Core Competencies.” The series is presented by the Southeastern and Southwestern Injury Prevention Network and the Safe States Alliance. In this webinar series, experienced professionals in the field discuss how they use the Core Competencies for Injury and Violence Prevention (IVP) to develop and advance their own skills, as well as those of staff they manage. The Core Competencies can provide a roadmap for gaining or strengthening the essential knowledge, skills and behaviors needed to grow professionally; develop, implement and evaluate IVP programs and policies; and strengthen the field and practice of IVP. Webinar #1 provides the rational for this series, highlighting the ways the competencies can help participants in their work. Webinars #2-6 address Core Competencies for IVP #1-7, and core competencies #8-9 are addressed throughout each presentation. This webinar series is relevant to those with a variety of experiences and/or years of service, including: – Professionals working in IVP and/or other areas of public health – Individuals anywhere along the spectrum of professional development –those new to public health and/or IVP, and those who have been working for several years and want to further develop their competencies.

Learning Objectives: • Gain an understanding of how the core competencies can help you to develop professionally and improve your IVP work. • Learn about and be able to explain the common competencies used in unintentional and intentional injury prevention. • Understand how the competencies cross-link injury and violence prevention to the broader practice of public health and the delivery of essential public health services in any program area or setting. • Understand the relevance of core competencies within the context of the history of injury and violence prevention through the stories of experienced professionals. • Understand the organization, purpose and key content of each session in this webinar series.

From Compliance to Competency Webinars. Year Developed: 2017?. Source: Regional Centers for Workforce Transformation. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Webinar Series. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: Series; various lengths.

Annotation: This is a series of 23 webinars on the New York State Direct Support Professional Core Competencies. Each webinar reviews one of the 23 core competencies through story-telling and vivid descriptions of a competent Direct Service Provider supporting someone with an intellectual and/or developmental disability. Goal areas include putting people first, building and maintaining positive relationships, demonstrating professionalism, supporting good health, supporting safety, having a home, and being active and productive in society. This series was designed in response to requests and needs shared by frontline supervisors in 2017. Training manuals, handouts, and other materials accompany the videos.

Bringing it All Together: An Integrated Approach (WISH Module 6). Year Developed: 2012. Source: North Carolina Institute for Public Health. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 20 minutes.

Annotation: This is the final training in a six-part series designed for public health and/or mental health professionals who oversee health programs and services for adolescent girls and women of reproductive age. It brings together the content of the earlier modules in the series to show the complete model of the integrated approach with all of its component parts. It also has suggested exercises for learners who would like to think about how some of the concepts learned in the training series might be relevant to their own professional settings. It is strongly recommended that users complete the modules in the series in sequence. To see a complete listing for the series please go to the Training Series section of this site. The Women's Integrated Systems for Health (WISH) Online Training Series focuses on key components of an integrated approach to promoting the health of women during late adolescence and throughout the child-bearing years. This training series arose from the need for practice-based tools that advance multi-disciplinary partnership, community engagement and using evidence-based approaches grounded in proven theoretical models. Women's Integrated Systems for Health (WISH) was a training grant funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau and the Bureau of Health Professions in the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) in 2010-13 with a partnership between the NC Institute for Public Health and the Department of Maternal and Child Health at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health and the UNC Center for Maternal and Infant Health at the UNC School of Medicine. The project focused on promoting integrative community approaches to optimize mental and physical health among adolescents and women of reproductive age.

Learning Objectives: • Describe how various components such as evidence-based practice, a public health approach and partnership come together to form an integrated approach to women’s health issues. • Cite 3 examples of how an integrated approach made an impact in real life situations. • Identify 3 specific actions which can be taken to apply some of what has been learned in this training series.

Quality Improvement Quick Guide Tutorial. Year Developed: 2010. Source: Public Health Foundation. Presenter(s): Public Health Foundation . Type: Online Course Video. Level: Introductory. Length: 30 minutes.

Annotation: The problem solving steps of Plan, Do, Check and Act (PFCA) are the focus of this tutorial. An STI case example is used to explore and frame this model in detail. Quality Improvement in Public Health is defined as well. Optional audio-only, slides-only or video are available to complete the tutorial via the learner’s preference. A knowledge assessment is available for personal evaluation.

Learning Objectives: • Identify quality improvement (QI) tools in the Public Health Foundation’s online resource centers. • List the main problem solving steps of Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA).

Maximizing your Program’s Potential with Continuous Quality Improvement (Capacity Building Webinar 3). Year Developed: 2010. Source: National Association of County and City Health Officials, CityMatCH. Presenter(s): Grace Gorenflo. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Introductory Intermediate Advanced. Length: 80 minutes.

Annotation: In this webinar, part of the Emerging Issues in Maternal and Child Health Series, the presenter summarizes the purposes and benefits of continuous quality improvement (CQI). She begins by explaining the process of conducting CQI, and then reviews the PDCA framework, using an example of a home visitation program. She concludes the presentation with a discussion of the differences between CQI and program evaluation. Reference materials are available through links provided in the presentation.

Learning Objectives: • Define CQI. • Describe the Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA) process. • Understand the difference between quality improvement and evaluation. • Identify 1 - 2 examples of how to apply CQI to a home visitation program.

Continuing Education: CME for non-physicians may receive a certificate of participation; CME for physicians, CNE, and CECH CEUS of 1.5 hours are available; .15 IACET CEUs are available.

Heartland Centers: Quality Improvement Concepts. Year Developed: 2010. Source: Public Health Foundation TRAIN National. Presenter(s): Marty Galutia. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 45 minutes.

Annotation: In this short course, Marty Galutia describes quality improvement concepts and how to apply them to improve processes and systems. The presentation reviews the reasons why quality improvement is sought, the process considered broadly, and provides information specific to the Kano Model of Quality. The roles of customers and consumers in QI also are considered. Interactive exercises are built into the presentation throughout.

Special Instructions: Registration to TRAIN is required. After logging in, the course can be accessed by entering the course id (1025091) into the “Search By Course ID” box on the right side of the landing page. On the next page, click on the "Registration" tab and then click on "Launch."

Implementing and Sustaining Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) in an Organization. Year Developed: 2009. Source: Upper Midwest Public Health Training Center. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Online Course. Level: Introductory. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation: This course is designed for leaders and professionals who work in public health. The goal is to provide them with an awareness of quality improvement and how it can be used in public health to "work smarter, not harder". There are four sections in this course: Section 1: CQI Myths Section 2: Brief Overview of CQI Section 3: Incorporating CQI into Organizational Culture Section 4: Demonstrating How CQI works in Governmental Public Health – A Case Study

Learning Objectives: • Describe three common myths of CQI and the corresponding reality. • Define continuous quality improvement and how it can be used to enhance organizational performance. • Describe common characteristics of CQI. • Describe the elements needed for an organization to successfully implement and sustain CQI activities. • Discuss how to successfully incorporate CQI into an organization's culture. • Identify examples of how CQI has been implemented in a local public health agency.

Special Instructions: To access this course, you first need to create an account

Workforce Transformation Video Series. Year Developed: n.a.. Source: Regional Centers for Workforce Transformation. Presenter(s): n.a.. Type: Webinar Series. Level: Introductory Intermediate. Length: Series; various lengths.

Annotation: This video series is designed to help train Direct Support Professionals (DSP) and inform stake holders on the importance of the New York State Core Competencies and Code of Ethics. The videos include (1) core competencies orientation; (2) redefining the role of the DSP: moving from caregiver to support professional; (3) demonstrating professionalism; (4) how to supervise using the core competencies and code of ethics; (5) what families need to know about the changing roles and expectations of direct support staff; (6) informed decision-making; and (7) being active and productive in the community. Training manuals, handouts, and other materials accompany the videos.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.