Trainings

Trainings

Exploring Implicit Bias in Interprofessional Education and Practice

URL 1: https://umn.webex.com/ec3100/eventcenter/recording/recordAction.do?theAction=poprecord&siteurl=umn&entappname=url3100&internalRecordTicket=4832534b0000000277ee34ef8bf38a8e3e85568e620f29546bf2f40f1f5345583bd244f4784af689&renewticket=0&isurlact=true&format=short&rnd=1150609883&RCID=45742e09cef44b019cc882693aff526e&rID=73200582&needFilter=false&recordID=73200582&apiname=lsr.php&AT=pb&actappname=ec3100&&SP=EC&entactname=%2FnbrRecordingURL.do&actname=%2Feventcenter%2Fframe%2Fg.do

URL 2: https://www.aihc-us.org/aihc-interprofessional-webinar

Date Developed: 06/18/2015. Source: American Interprofessional Health Collaborative. Presenter(s): Dr. Margaret Stuber, Dr. Janice Sabin. Type: Webinar Archive. Level: Intermediate Advanced. Length: 60 minutes.

Annotation

Implicit or unconscious assumptions and biases challenge collaborative work within interprofessional teams and affect health equity for the population. Although pattern recognition is used by all health care professionals in their work, the results of assumptions made on the basis of past experience can be a hazard to client’s health. Women can be undertreated for heart disease, wealthy people may not be tested for HIV, or people of certain cultures may be undertreated for pain. Similarly, assumptions about people in specific professional fields may shape the way we interact, limiting the efficacy of our teams.

This webinar addressed the definition and science of implicit or unconscious bias, as well as its role in contributing to social determinants of health. It used case examples to illustrate how unconscious bias affects clinical care, and discussed the research in this field. It presented ways to mitigate the effects of unconscious bias in health care, including diverse input in clinical decision-making and team care. It discussed how these ideas and objectives can be incorporated effectively into interprofessional education.

Learning Objectives

• Review the science of implicit social cognition and define implicit associations.

• Describe situations in which unconscious bias may affect clinical care.

• Identify strategies to minimize the influence of unconscious bias on interactions with patients and other healthcare professionals.

Special Instructions

All individuals will be required to set up a learner profile through a guest account to register for AIHC educational activities. More information about this one-time process and how to register for AIHC webinars can be found at https://aihc-us.org/AIHCregistration.

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.