Trainings

Trainings

Public Health Approaches to Reducing U. S. Infant Mortality

URL 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MM_G0MPdCJM

URL 2: https://www.cdc.gov/cdcgrandrounds/archives/index.htm

Date Developed: 10/16/2012. Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Presenter(s): Wanda Barfield, MD, MPH, FAAP; Denise D’Angelo, MPH; Rachel Moon, MD, FAAP; Michael C. Lu, MD, MS, MPH. Type: Video Lecture. Level: Advanced. Length: 100 minutes.

Annotation

This session of Grand Rounds explored public health approaches to reducing U.S. infant mortality. This session also coincided with the 20th anniversary of Child Health Month inaugurated by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Both nationally and globally, infant mortality is a key measure of population health. The infant mortality rate, the rate at which babies less than one year of age die, has continued to steadily decline in the US over the past several decades; data from 2010 shows 6.15 deaths per 1,000 live births. Despite overall progress, racial disparities in infant mortality persist and preventable infant deaths continue to occur. Public health agencies including CDC/ATSDR, health care providers, and communities of all ethnic groups must partner to further reduce the infant mortality rate in the United States. This joint approach should address the social, behavioral, and health risk factors that affect birth outcomes. This session of Grand Rounds highlighted accomplishments and explored public health, clinical, and policy strategies to improve birth outcomes, with special consideration of high risk individuals, families, and communities. An accompanying video, Beyond the Data, discusses new updates in infant mortality reduction.

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UE8MC25742; MCH Navigator for $180,000/year. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.